Comments

Q and A: canning summer squash, using mashed zucchini, and dehydrating celery — 7 Comments

  1. Karla,

    yes, you do add water like you do for other vegetables. Sorry if you were confused.

    Jackie

  2. Jackie, in your directions for canning squash you say to add salt optionally, but you don’t mention adding water – is it not necessary?

    I like the idea of squash butter, Margie! Are there directions for that in another blog?

    Jackie, thanks for all your good advice and information – I read your blogs and ‘Ask Jackie’ voraciously! I’ve still gotta get your “Growing and Canning…” book…

  3. Margie,

    Thanks for the follow-up. Now we have yet another thing to do with all those over-sized squash!

    Jackie

  4. The squash butter turned out really good. Didn’t care a lot for it when it was “fresh” but after it set for a few days it is wonderful.

  5. Bethany,

    Yes, you can safely dehydrate ground beef. It’s no more dangerous than dehydrating jerky. The marinade and spices do nothing to add to safety. Just be sure your meat is very dry or it could go moldy or rancid at room temperature. If it is not very hard/dry, refrigerate for long-term storage then use within a week or two.

    Jackie

  6. Jackie, I’ve been looking into making backpacking meals and just-add-water meals in a jar, and I’ve run across many recipes for dehydrating ground beef. The common method seems to be to fully cook lean ground beef, use boiling water to rinse away all fat, and then dehydrate til very hard. Do you think this is safe? Would bacteria grow during the dehydrating? Does the finished product need to be frozen or is it shelf stable? Thanks for any info you have on this. I told my husband, “I’ll just ask Jackie, she’d never steer us wrong.” You’re someone i admire greatly and i know i can trust your opinion. Thanks!

  7. I never blanch my celery, either, brfore dehydrating, and it turns out fine.

    If you’re watching your salt intake, you might grind the dehydrated celery in a coffer/spice grinder, and use the powder in place of salt. It’s especially good sprinkled on corn-on-the-cob or scrambled eggs – adds another element to the taste.