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View Full Version : 7mm-08 vs .260 Rem?


Crash
11-09-2006, 12:42 PM
Is the 7mm-08 falling out of favor? I'm finding fewer and fewer places in the San Antonio area that carry ammo for it. Conversely, I find that more and more shops are carrying ammo for the .260 Rem.

Crash

hunter63
11-09-2006, 05:18 PM
Are you shooting the 7mm-08? or the .260?
I guess I am curious as to the advantages of each round.
I have a 7mm mag ( out west big game gun) and a .270 (out west antelope gun).
'corse I use them both for whitetails also.

To me both of these are just cal. that were invented to sell more guns

DM
11-09-2006, 08:10 PM
To me both of these are just cal. that were invented to sell more guns

To me they are great low recoiling rounds that will work through a "short" action and make a short handy rifle. Both are excelent deer/blk bear rounds, even though i prefer the 7-08 because of it's slightly better bullet offerings.

DM

Crash
11-10-2006, 12:59 AM
Are you shooting the 7mm-08? or the .260?
I guess I am curious as to the advantages of each round.
I have a 7mm mag ( out west big game gun) and a .270 (out west antelope gun).
'corse I use them both for whitetails also.

To me both of these are just cal. that were invented to sell more guns

hunter63,

I shoot a 7mm-08 and a couple of years ago I could find more places that carried the cartridge and a better selection of bullet types, weights, etc. Now, several places don't carry it all and those that do have a smaller selection.

And I agree with you--these, and many others, were invented just to sell guns.

Crash

scoutinlife
11-10-2006, 07:03 PM
Crash pretty well summed it up the 7mm-08 easy to find ammo almost anywhere I have a 7mm-08 and love it! ;D

hunter63
05-22-2016, 02:07 AM
Just a note to a 10 year old Zombie thread....LOL
Last week I just found a N&R Handi Rifle 7mm-08 on sale at out local Gander Mountain for $229.

Kinda of remarkable as they have been out of production for about a year....and the H&R?NEF Barrel Accessory Program is no longer operating.

Things change in 10 years...and I still believe this is a "extra caliber"....but is one of the few calibers, I don't have, in a Handi Rifle....so my search is harder to fill in the blanks.

Jjr
05-23-2016, 01:13 AM
That .260 Remington was the fifth metamorphosis, re-invention or whatever one wishes to call it best as I remember of the old 6mm/.244 Remington! According to many authorities the 6mm was a better round than the .243 Winchester but it just never caught on that well.

The .243/.308 twins are well established and I would pick one of them personally, over either the .260 Remington or the 7mm-08, but I don't always take my own advice.

For the handloader the 7mm-08 would probably win hand down because of the availability of .243 & .308 brass.

What-the-heck, if you can afford them, buy yourself one of each!

hunter63
05-24-2016, 01:04 AM
That .260 Remington was the fifth metamorphosis, re-invention or whatever one wishes to call it best as I remember of the old 6mm/.244 Remington! According to many authorities the 6mm was a better round than the .243 Winchester but it just never caught on that well.

The .243/.308 twins are well established and I would pick one of them personally, over either the .260 Remington or the 7mm-08, but I don't always take my own advice.

For the handloader the 7mm-08 would probably win hand down because of the availability of .243 & .308 brass.

What-the-heck, if you can afford them, buy yourself one of each!


LOL...well I haven't found a .260 Handi......yet....
BUT
I just picked up a .280 Rem Handi at a show this week end......so many calibers, so little time.

MtnManJim
05-26-2016, 12:05 AM
That .260 Remington was the fifth metamorphosis, re-invention or whatever one wishes to call it best as I remember of the old 6mm/.244 Remington! According to many authorities the 6mm was a better round than the .243 Winchester but it just never caught on that well.

The .243/.308 twins are well established and I would pick one of them personally, over either the .260 Remington or the 7mm-08, but I don't always take my own advice.

For the handloader the 7mm-08 would probably win hand down because of the availability of .243 & .308 brass.

What-the-heck, if you can afford them, buy yourself one of each!

No sir, that’s not exactly right. The old 6mm/.244 Remington was based on the “necked down” .257 Roberts cartridge case, while the .243 Winchester, the .260 Remington, as well as the 7mm-08 Remington are all based on the “necked down” .308 Winchester cartridge case. Therefore, to the handloader, if brass availability was a problem (which it is not) any of the .308 Winchester based (the .243, the .260, OR the 7mm-08) cartridges would probably be a good choice.
I can’t totally agree either with the thinking that the 7mm-08 Remington and .260 Remington were just “invented to sell more guns” – no more so than any other cartridge invented since the advent of smokeless powder. Well, maybe the .260 Remington – I have an admitted, unreasonable bias against 6.5mm cartridges such as the .260 Remington. But that’s just me. However, the 7mm-08 Remington was the darling wildcat of the long-range metallic silhouette rifle shooters for a long time before Remington commercialized it.
My wife has had two 7mm-08s. The first one, a Ruger, I gave her for her birthday back in the early ‘80s. Up until then she’d been using an old Remington 660, .243 Winchester for mule deer. There was nothing wrong with the .243 for mule deer though. It’s just that my wife had never had a new rifle of her own and the 7mm-08 cartridge had just been commercialized. So that’s what I bought her. She took quite a number of mule deer with that rifle before she decided to buy herself a new Winchester M-70 Featherweight chambered for the 7mm-08. I can only remember my wife killing one mule deer with her second 7mm-08. However, it was a whopper – the biggest bodied mule deer either of us has ever killed.
Nowadays, our oldest daughter has laid claim to the Featherweight, while our oldest grandson has done the same to the Ruger. And both our daughter and grandson have had good success on mule deer with those two rifles.
About 10 years ago, my wife had a semi-custom M-70 Winchester, 7mm Remington Magnum built. It works for mule deer just as well as her 7mm-08s. But the truth is, her 7mm Rem Mag is more cartridge than necessary for mule deer around these parts where shots are generally less than 150 yards. Then again, as a handloader it’s real easy to make a 7mm Rem Mag shoot like a 7mm-08 for mule deer at less than 150 yards, or bump it up in power for larger animals and/or longer ranges.:)

MtnManJim
05-26-2016, 02:57 AM
Is the 7mm-08 falling out of favor? I'm finding fewer and fewer places in the San Antonio area that carry ammo for it. Conversely, I find that more and more shops are carrying ammo for the .260 Rem.

Crash

It's entirely possible the 7mm-08 is falling out of favor right now. I truly wouldn't know because as an avid handloader, I seldom fire factory ammo other than .22 rimfire stuff.
However, from what I read in various guns and shooting magazines, not to mention these internet message forums, the .260 Rem is being pushed harder than the 7mm-08 these days. Having been around big game hunting and big game guns and ammunition for well over a half century, I'm well aware of the fact that whatever big game cartridge is being pushed the hardest by the various writers is going to be the biggest seller at the time.:rolleyes:
Disclaimer - As I stated in my previous post in this thread, I don't like 6.5mm cartridges such as the .260 Remington. I just don't. I have an unwarranted bias against 6.5mm cartridges. So sue me. I'll only grudgingly admit that a .260 Remington will probably do anything a 7mm-08 will do.:laugh:
Therefore, my best advise about choosing between a 260 Remington (6.5mm-08) and a 7mm-08 would be to make your choice based on the rifle, not the cartridge.
And get into handloading.:)

HonorableHojutsuRyu
06-09-2017, 06:53 PM
I go with 6.5 Creedmoor for the long range ballistics and energy retention. It is the new long range competition cartridge and it makes for a flat shooting hunting round.

This being said, it is one that might need to be handloaded for economical use. Most available ammunition is match grade, for a reason, though some hunting rounds are manufactured. It is finding the hunting rounds in a store that is the challenge. Places like Bass Pro and Cabela's have the match round in stock in store but one can order the hunting rounds from their online stores for both.

I would doubt many independent retailers, such as mom and pop shops, would stock the round, but I would say the same for .260 Remington and 7mm-08. They are neither the cartridge of the hour nor are they the long term favorites such as .30-06 Springfield, .270 Winchester, .223 Remington, .300 Winchster Magnum, or 7mm Remington Magnum, for example.

Jjr
06-10-2017, 02:35 AM
The 6mm & 6.5 calibers have never been that popular on the American Continent, but the 6.5 x 55 SM is still quite popular in Europe and for many years was their average hunters go-to caliber, much like our own .30-06 Springfield was for many years.

I have never cared much for the 7mm cartridges myself, but that doesn't mean they are not good calibers, and some hunters or target shooters out there think they are the greatest thing since sliced bread. I have a great friend who has a 7mm-08 and he loves it.

I have a 6.5 x 55 and love it, but most people look at it and say Yuck! And it is not an ugly rifle in the slightest, but they do not like the caliber, most not realizing what the 6.5 x 55 is capable of, in both the accuracy department and the game animals it is capable of harvesting.

Unless I am mistaken, no 6.5 x 55 chambered rifles are currently being produced by domestic manufacturers, although Remington, Ruger & Winchester have all produced them in the past. The people that purchased those limited production runs do not sell their 6.5 x 55's, which should speak volumes, since almost any other caliber rifles can be located on the used market. The majority of the 6.5 x 55's encountered in the used market are old military guns, but many of them are still excellent rifles, which also says much for both the rifle and cartridge.

I think the 6.5 Creedmoor should be an excellent caliber, but I have no direct experience with it myself, but if what I have read is correct, I hope it will help educate the average shooter to the superb accuracy of this category of cartridges. I know its heritage is from a super caliber.

MtnManJim
06-14-2017, 05:01 AM
I go with 6.5 Creedmoor for the long range ballistics and energy retention. It is the new long range competition cartridge and it makes for a flat shooting hunting round.
I think the new 6.5 Creedmoor probably will "make for a flat shooting hunting round" - a good one. And I predict it will fall out of favor with the professional gun writers and be largely obscure by the time another year has passed.;)
It seems rather ironic to me that in my previous posts in this thread, which I posted 13 months ago, I wrote how at that time, the .260 was being pushed harder by the professional gun writers than the 7mm-08. And I proposed that was the reason why the original poster was finding more .260 ammo than 7mm-08 ammo on store shelves.
Now, 13 months later, the 6.5 Creedmoor is the darling of the professional gun writers. But I predict it won't be for long. It will fall out of favor with the professional gun writers, and fade away like the .260 (6.5mm-08) and the 7mm-08 before it.
I promise this; If I'm still around, and this forum is still around in another year - if my prediction about the 6.5 Creedmoor fading into the same level of obscurity as the .260 Remington already has done in the past year, I'll be back to admit my mistake. If I'm right, I promise I won't gloat.:D

MtnManJim
07-19-2018, 05:16 PM
[QUOTE= Now, 13 months later, the 6.5 Creedmoor is the darling of the professional gun writers. But I predict it won't be for long. It will fall out of favor with the professional gun writers, and fade away like the .260 (6.5mm-08) and the 7mm-08 before it.
I promise this; If I'm still around, and this forum is still around in another year - if my prediction about the 6.5 Creedmoor fading into the same level of obscurity as the .260 Remington already has done in the past year, I'll be back to admit my mistake. If I'm right, I promise I won't gloat.:D[/QUOTE]
Okay, I was wrong. The 6.5 Creedmoor hasn't faded into obscurity during the past year, and is in fact chambered by quite a number of popular rifle manufacturers now.
That still doesn't mean I'll ever come to like a 6.5mm anything though.:rolleyes:

Tim Horton
07-19-2018, 10:51 PM
A bit of info that may be useful.
If I have the history right.... Yes, the 257 Roberts, 244 Rem, 6mm Rem are all variations from the 7x57 Mauser parent case. Yes. the 7-08, 260 Rem are from the 308 Win parent case. Both cases close cousins in the mid length case range.

In the early days of some of these calibers, especially 257 Roberts, 244 Rem, 220 Swift, 219 Donaldson Ace and the like the two things that hampered them even at there most popular time was the lack of chrome in barrel steel, and slow twist rates. If twist rates for some of these calibers had evolved like the evolution of twist rates in the AR 15, some might still be popular as they are so hand loader friendly. No argument these calibers could and did perform. Just not to there best with equipment of there day.

I'm not sure, but for some reason it seems the Creedmoore and some of the other hybrid calibers of late are more closely related to things like the old 250 Savage, 22-250 case body shape.

I think there were even a few of these old wild cats from things like the 6.5 and other diameters of Mannlicher Schoenauer parent case. And again the circle seems to repeat with things like the new Norma calibers using, I think, 6.5 Sweede and an old time British rimless small bore caliber intended for use in Africa.

In todays world, I would select the 308 Win of the mid length options. Not too much overkill for some things. Not too little power for other things. Popular and available most every where. But then, I'm quite content to be old school about many things.

My 5 cents of knowledge about this.

MtnManJim
07-19-2018, 11:32 PM
Yeppers, in today's world, I too would select the 308 Win of the mid length options. In fact, even in yesterday's world, the 308 Win was my choice; a 308 Win was my choice for my first big game rifle 55 years ago.
I still have that rifle, and even though over the years I've had many other big game rifles of different calibers, as well as chambered for different cartridges, I could still get by with my old 308 Winchester if I had to.
I don't have to though. And that's why when I take to the hills this fall, I'll be carrying my custom 308 Norma Magnum. It was my retirement gift to myself, I paid for it with my first two Social Security payments, and I love it.
BTW, thanks for the history Tim. I've always enjoyed learning about different cartridges, how they were developed, and their advantages as well as their shortfalls.