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View Full Version : 1970s vintage John Deere 820 question..


Dave
06-05-2009, 09:54 PM
I am looking at buying a John Deere 820 Diesel tractor. Looks to be very well kept; however, I am unsure if I can get a front loader for it.

Naturally, I could probably fabricate parts to make a front loader work but I am not sure if someone out there can readily answer this question in whether or not it is possible.

It is a 31HP diesel, with PTO and hydraulic system and as the title says it is a 1970s vintage tractor so about 35 years old.

Thank you,

Dave

ldsparamedic
06-05-2009, 11:19 PM
Dave,
I would say with great certainty that you can get a loader for it. Your local John Deere dealer will tell you which JD models will work. Most off brands will be able to tell you which of their models will work. When you find the models look on the site tractorshed.com as they are an excellent resource for tractors, accessories and machinery of all makes and ages.

cinok
06-05-2009, 11:25 PM
Just keep in mind a loader may cost you 3-5 k for a new one here is a link to kokyker loaders
http://www.koykermfg.com/

indyguy
06-05-2009, 11:35 PM
Deere still has a loader for it and several aftermarket brands do as well.

That tractor in my area will bring 3 to 5 K depending on condition and hours. Same tractor with a oader installed will bring 5 to 8K.

The 820 and 830s were built in Deeres Germany factory. They have no real issues and are a tough little tractor.

Anon001
06-06-2009, 12:12 AM
Dave,

You can get a front loader for just about any tractor. I bought two at farm sales. It took awhile to find them. I have an AC WD and an AC WD-45. I paid $100 each for the two loaders. They are different types but both work great and work just as well as a new one.

Dave
06-06-2009, 01:20 AM
Thank you guys for the replies.. Being a little new to the world of tractors I was not certain how to verify this specifically on an older model tractor.

Here are my reasons for this particular tractor.

1) Low price ($3,900 in this case)
2) 2600 hrs doing mostly mowing and box blading (for 35 years that is less than 100 hours a year) The current owner has had it for over 20 years under cover.
3) Not many electronic gizmos or sensitive equipment to go bad.
4) Being new to tractors, I want something that will not be complicated for me to learn on as a novice.
5) I wanted something I can add a front loader too just simply for having the utility of a fork lift and of course a bucket. (you all answered this requirement)
6) Lastly, I just think things were built better 35 years ago :)

I really appreciate your input and would happily take any more advice you may have to offer.

Dave

AlchemyAcres
06-06-2009, 01:33 AM
There were 2 older John Deere 820s.
A 2-cylinder diesel built in the 50s and a 3-cylinder built in the 60s and 70s.

I looked up the serial number range......

1968: 10000
1969: 23100
1970: 36000
1971: 54000
1972: 71850
1973: 90200

2,600 hours....hmmmmm.......:o



~Martin

Dave
06-06-2009, 01:45 AM
This is the 32hp 3 cylinder diesel model. He couldn't give me an exact year but naturally I could tell once I get a serial number. He is certain it was built post 1970.

2600 hrs can be two different stories depending on how hard those hours were.

Obviously I would inspect the tractor before I bought it, is there anything I need to look for in general outside of heavy smoking or obvious oil leaks?

Dave

indyguy
06-06-2009, 12:27 PM
check the function of the hydraulics....... start the tractor and raise the 3pt hitch. does it raise smoothly or raise in jerks?

also push the clutch in and raise the 3pt hitch.... how does the hitch raise now?

this tractor has live hydraulics but also has a trans driven charge pump for the main hyd pump...... the above steps will give you a good indication of the overall hyd system.

start it cold... how is the engine idle? do rpms hold steady or move up and down some what? If not holding rpms steady most likely has a broken govener flex ring in the injection pump...... a common repair on older Deere tractors.

any white smoke on start up?

Not trying to over load you with questions but almost 20yrs with Deere under my belt and know what to look for.

Dave
06-06-2009, 01:50 PM
Great advice Indyguy.

I am going to take a look at the tractor this afternoon. I will watch for white smoke which I know is bad in diesels, rpm fluctuation, obvious oil leaks, and of course hydraulic health bases on your recommended method above.

I should be back sometime this evening so hopefully I will have a report for everyone.

Something about those older tractors really appeal to me.

Thank you,

Dave

Anon001
06-06-2009, 03:29 PM
Dave,

Check the condition of the tires and rims. The rims should be fine, but tires are high dollar. I replaced 4 tires two years ago and it was over $400 and I know the prices have skyrocketed since then.

Dave
06-06-2009, 09:44 PM
No go on the tractor today. Unfortunately I was not able to contact the seller while we were out in the area. He is an older gentleman so I am guessing he just hasn't received my messages yet though we have been in contact via email. This will probably be delayed until next week.

I will keep you all posted.

Also, good advice on the tires Paul, I will be sure to inspect their condition.

Dave

Dave
06-14-2009, 09:48 PM
Well the kids have already named our new tractor "Pappy" and "he" is handsome. To be honest, for a 40 year old tractor that hasn't been restored it is in GREAT condition. The engine idles great, starts right up like new and appears to be all original. Even the seat has no cracks. This tractor was definitely kept well and garage stored. I am cautiously optimistic that I found a great tractor at a good price.

Here is a picture of Pappy while we were visiting. We plan to pick him up this week or next week:

http://www.cxp.com/username/jd820-01.jpg

Dave

indyguy
06-14-2009, 11:19 PM
Thats a good looking unit Dave. Looks to have had a good home in its past life.

Dave
06-15-2009, 02:05 PM
Here are a few more pictures...

http://www.cxp.com/username/jd820-02.jpg
http://www.cxp.com/username/jd820-03.jpg
http://www.cxp.com/username/jd820-04.jpg
http://www.cxp.com/username/jd820-06.jpg

Dave

Dave
06-15-2009, 02:22 PM
Thats a good looking unit Dave. Looks to have had a good home in its past life.

By the way, thank you and the others on this thread for their assistance and advice.

I am keeping my fingers crossed and will let everyone know how it does.

Dave

indyguy
06-15-2009, 02:34 PM
judging it from the pics it came from a VERY good home........ you can tell from the shiney white filters it has been serviced.

That tractor has good sheetmetal.......... front of hood is not all bent up from driving into stuff and rear fenders dont show much damage.

I do believe its the 1st 820 I have seem with a hortizonal exhaust. Thats great for mowing and such along tree lines as you dont have limbs being pulling by a vertical exhaust and then whipping into you face.
.
Spend some seat time useing it and you will fall in love.........

Dave
06-15-2009, 02:52 PM
judging it from the pics it came from a VERY good home........ you can tell from the shiney white filters it has been serviced.

That tractor has good sheetmetal.......... front of hood is not all bent up from driving into stuff and rear fenders dont show much damage.

I do believe its the 1st 820 I have seem with a hortizonal exhaust. Thats great for mowing and such along tree lines as you dont have limbs being pulling by a vertical exhaust and then whipping into you face.
.
Spend some seat time useing it and you will fall in love.........

The over all condition is what I noticed when I pulled up. Everything seems to have been well cared for and judging by the land it was maintaining I think the hours on it are pretty easy hours.

Based on the serial number I was able to determine it was a 1969 model. The engine sounded great, ran like a sewing machine. Also, when we adjusted the RPMs it maintained a very good idle. Hydraulics also seem to perform without issue but some things I guess won't show until I put it under a little stress like bush hogging or discing.

I don't know what it is about old tractors but I seem to be more drawn to them than I do newer ones. Maybe it is just the simplicity or it's story? When I walked up to it the first thing that came to mind is this is nothing more than an engine sitting on a big transmission. When you look at new tractors you don't really get that feeling because of all the fluff (gizmos).

The wife of the man who had it for sale seemed quite attached to it. She is your typical sweet southern bell that loves to wear wrist jewelry as you can tell by the steering wheel scratches...

Dave

Any ways, the bonding has already begun :)

Dave