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View Full Version : How long does white flour last?


Penny_Plinker
04-26-2008, 11:02 PM
I bought 25 lbs for 3.97 at Walmart and then when i got it home noticed it had an expiration date of 4/08.

Penny

theresehirko
04-26-2008, 11:50 PM
If you have a foodsaver vacuum sealer, divide it up into bags and vacuum seal it. I would freeze it for 24 hours after vacuum sealing it though to kill any weevil eggs. If you don't have a food sealer, package it into gallon ziploc bags, squeezing as much air out of the bags as possible. Freeze these also for 24 hours. Other than being infiltrated by pests, or otherwise being tainted, you should be okay. You need to rotate your stock anyway on a regular basis. We usually have 25# of flour in the house at all times. But then again, I bake six loaves of bread each week.

anna
04-27-2008, 02:12 AM
As long as it stays dry, cool and bug free. I consider white flour an inert substance.

Penny_Plinker
04-27-2008, 09:00 AM
Thanks Theresehirko and Anna. So i tried to use my MIL's vacuume attachment that seals wide mouth jars, but it was hard to use and then it quit working right after hubby put the attachment on without a lid. He's going to try to fix it. But i had to put the rest in the gallon zip locks and will freeze it overnight.

I know white flour is rather "inert" and we don't eat much of it and mix it half and half with whole wheat or other flours for bread.

Theresehirko, or anyone, what kind of vacuume sealer do you use?

Penny

leera
04-27-2008, 11:25 AM
I have a FoodSaver brand,GameSaver Plus......and this thing is great!

It has adjustable vac. so I can take out as much or little of the air as I need to.It's all automatic too,which makes it really easy to put away meat,etc,without having a helper in the kitchen.

Shamrock1121
04-27-2008, 12:02 PM
White flour is not an inert food, has a relatively short shelf life and should be used within 6-12 months of purchase. It may have a "use-by" date on the package, so you may want to keep that date in mind. I'd also err on the side of 6 months because you have no idea when the flour was milled, left in storage or warehoused before it hit the shelf. It will keep longer if vacuum-sealed and kept in the freezer, but not indefinitely.

If you try to use "old" flour for yeast bread, you'll end up with a crummy loaf - it's a major cause of "bad" yeast bread for people who rarely use flour and often end up using old flour. It's also another reason I consider storage of commercial bleached or unbleached flour a short-term storage food only.

This is another reason to purchase wheat and use freshly-milled flour. Wheat keeps for years and years and is a fraction of the price of bleached/unbleached flour. Worst case, you can actually plant wheat and get more wheat.... Try that with flour.

If commercial flour is considerd "inert" why would you really want to consume it ??? Your body need nutrients, not empty calories.

Using 100% freshly milled whole wheat gives you 25 vitamins, minerals and proteins, as well as the high fiber benefit of bran, ONLY available in freshly milled flour from whole grain berries. It's naturally preserved in it's shell (the bran). Purchasing commercial whole wheat flour is even worse. Once milled, flour can become rancid in a relatively short amount of time. Flour doesn't have to smell rancid to BE rancid. Vitamin loss begins as quickly as 3 hours after milling. Flours that have been left on the shelf for many months have lost large portions of their B complex and C. vitamins. The "crap" that they fortify commercial flour with is inorganic minerals and chemical vitamins. They only replace a small portion of the nutrition that was removed to begin with.

http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t--1039/flour-storage-guide.asp

-Karen

WileyCoyote
04-27-2008, 04:09 PM
Oh, and the reason flour is recommended to be used within 12 months is that it has a propensity to grow mold. This mold is not the same stuff that grows on your baked bread - it is actually a basic form of LSD, highly concentrated, that can cause violent hallucinations, Heart spasms, and death in short order.

I have been searching like crazy for the name of it - I read a whole book about how moldy flour in one bakery almost destroyed a whole Italian town! - and last year a child whose mother used old bakery products to make brownies rushed him to the hospital with symptoms of LSD poisoning... but I can't find the dang references!

Anyway, flour ain't inert.

bee_pipes
04-27-2008, 08:20 PM
...been searching like crazy for the name of it...


Ergot? I think it usually grows on rye.

Regards,
Pat

Shamrock1121
04-27-2008, 09:02 PM
[quote author=theresehirko link=board=foo-other-food;num=1209258132;start=0#1 date=04/26/08 at 18:50:36]If you have a foodsaver vacuum sealer, divide it up into bags and vacuum seal it. *quote]

If you vacuum seal flour, make sure you do it in canning jars or canisters (per FoodSaver instructions), where it can remain loose - not bags where it's compacted. You're not supposed to compact flour when vacuum-sealing it because there's enough moisture in flour to cause the flour to mold and the mold can be an aflatoxin and quite dangerous when consumed.

-Karen

theresehirko
04-27-2008, 11:56 PM
I did not know that you shouldn't store flour in the vacuum bags. nothing has ever happened to us, but then again, we rotate flour fairly quickly in our house. For this question, the flour was expiring this month. You could also do a lot of baking and freeze the bread, muffins, unfrosted cake layers, etc.

Shamrock1121
04-28-2008, 08:23 AM
I did not know that you shouldn't store flour in the vacuum bags. *nothing has ever happened to us, but then again, we rotate flour fairly quickly in our house. *For this question, the flour was expiring this month. *You could also do a lot of baking and freeze the bread, muffins, unfrosted cake layers, etc. *

I've had several FoodSavers and the flour information was in one of the booklets that came with the machine.

Frozen home-baked foods have an even shorter freezer life than flour. Check this chart for more information.

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Information/FreezerChart.htm

-Karen