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View Full Version : Egg Noodles - Shelf Life?


9er
10-01-2008, 01:45 AM
If properly stored like pasta, do egg noodles have the similar shelf life? I can't find any info...

Thanks!

rockymtngirl
10-01-2008, 01:50 AM
9er - I don't see why not. I usually buy lots of egg noodles - both generic brand and 'no yolks' and I've never had a problem - I think the longest I've stored an unopened bag is probably 6 months, but I would think as long as they are stored appropriately they should last the same as regular pasta.

9er
10-01-2008, 02:21 AM
9er - I don't see why not. *I usually buy lots of egg noodles - both generic brand and 'no yolks' and I've never had a problem - I think the longest I've stored an unopened bag is probably 6 months, but I would think as long as they are stored appropriately they should last the same as regular pasta.

I usually eat my egg noodles within a few months. So I am looking to store away for a while.

Thanks for the info! 6m is still a good time. I just eat 'em before then. LOL

GoodDaughter
10-01-2008, 04:04 AM
I've had them stored for way over a year, probably about 14 months, and were perfectly good. I use a Food Saver vacuum sealer and put the unopened bag inside the Food Saver bag and seal it.

I also re-use the Food Saver bags when I open one. Am careful to not cut off any more than where it's sealed. Works well.

Shamrock1121
10-01-2008, 12:13 PM
Egg noodles are good 1-2 years UNopened. They should be used within 1-2 month after they are open.

sources: http://www.saveonfoods.com/foodnutrition/food_safety/shelflife_common_foods.htm

http://www.demesne.info/Home-Maintenance/Pantry.htm

As already mentioned, extend the shelf life by sealing them with vacuum sealer like a FoodSaver.

I prefer storage in a canning jar (sealed with a canning lid and a FoodSaver jar attachment) or FoodSaver Canister, so that you get all the air out of the container. If you use a FoodSaver bag and remove all the air, you'll end up crushing the dried egg noodles. If you only partially remove the air before you seal the bag, you defeat the purpose because there will be air remaining in the bag. Oxygen plus the fat in the eggs = rancid product.

I'll just put in ONE MORE PLUG for storing and using wheat (which has a 30-year + shelf life), having a mill for making flour, and being able to make something as simple as egg noodles yourself. FYI - durum wheat is the preferred wheat type for pasta.

I only need to make egg noodles once or twice a year. I make a fermented, sourdough type - http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/sourdough_egg_noodles.html - using whole grain durum flour I mill myself, dehydrate the cut noodles and store them if vacuum-sealed canning jars.

-Karen

GoodDaughter
10-01-2008, 02:19 PM
When I use my Food Saver, it does not crush the noodles. I put the unopened bag that the noodles come in (after leaving them several days in the freezer just in case) inside a food saver bag, so the noodles are actually double-bagged, I guess you'd say. Then I remove the air from the Food Saver bag. It does not crush the noodles and will only suck out the air in the Food Saver bag, not the original bag the noodles came in.

I use mine for all my pasta and macaroni, egg noodles, and spaetzels (Kluski noodles). Works fine, nothing crushed.

I'd like to use the attachment that comes with the Food Saver to use with jars, but I'd end up with a zillion jars and I don't have room for that many. That's why I 'double-bag' my stuff. I also do this with beans, flour, sugar, tea bags, cooked cereal and bags of grain.

MNMOM
10-02-2008, 07:39 PM
I will have to say that the Foodsaver is one of my favorite things in my kitchen, I use it constantly and I think it's a must when prepping all your foods. I'd hate to be without it.

All of the foods that I've dehydrated have been sealed in glass jars by the attachment for jars, I have both the wide mouth and regular attachments for jars.

pcrowder
10-02-2008, 08:43 PM
I've never used a food saver before - I see pictures of a big white cap that is shown over mason jars - does that stay in place, or does that just hold the regular metal dome lid while it is being vacumned?????

GoodDaughter
10-03-2008, 01:29 AM
I have the attachment, but I have never used it! I believe you just put the flat lid on the jar and the attachment over it, and it seals the jar.

leera
10-03-2008, 01:10 PM
I don't use mine for sealing jars.So not much help.

When I need to seal something that's in a bag though,I just do the same as GoodDaughter,never had a problem yet.I do find though,that if I seal flour like that,I have to sift the flour after to fluff it back up some.

Glass jars with tight fitting lids are the next best option,which I use a lot too.But I have a considerable amount of storage space as well.

Shamrock1121
10-03-2008, 02:11 PM
I have the attachment, but I have never used it! I believe you just put the flat lid on the jar and the attachment over it, and it seals the jar.

FYI - In order to use canning lids with the FoodSaver, you need to pre-soak the lids. You do that by bringing water to a boil, then turn off. Soak the lids for 5-10 minutes. This softens the sealing compound so that the lid seals properly.

-Karen

Shamrock1121
10-03-2008, 02:30 PM
[quote author=leera link=board=sel-primitive-skills;num=1222829117;start=0#9 date=10/03/08 at 07:10:27] ... if I seal flour like that,I have to sift the flour after to fluff it back up some. quote]

FYI - FoodSaver suggests putting flour in jars, where the flour remains loose, not the bags where it's packed together. The reason for this is because there is a certain amount of moisture in flour. When it's packed together in the FoodSaver bag, it can form mold, which can become a toxin (aflotoxin). It's also common for flour sealed in the bags to smell "stale" or "moldy" because it's been packed tightly in the bags.

Here are some quotes on the subject from the booklets I've had with the FoodSavers I've owned over the past 20+ years.

"Avoid drawing in liquids, powdery, or fine grained products into the unit. This will inhibit the vacuuming and seal process and may clog the unit, preventing it from drawing a good vacuum."

"When vacuum packaging fine granulated products such as flour, powdered milk, confectioners' sugar, or cornstarch, a SaverMate Canister or glass jar should be used. Cut a small circle out of paper towel, or use a round flat coffee filter, exactly the size of the opening of the canister or glass jar. Fill the container, and tap it lightly on a softer surface, such as a dish towel placed on your counter, to settle the contents. Then place the papertowel circle on the top of the contents to keep any fine particles from swirling up to the container rim and breaking the vacuum."

"When vacuum packaging flour, do not pack it tightly or compress it in any way. Flour tends to develop a mildew flavor when compressed."

-Karen

TNDadx4
10-03-2008, 06:56 PM
When vacuum packaging flour, do not pack it tightly or compress it in any way. Flour tends to develop a mildew flavor when compressed."

-Karen



Is there a way to vacuum pack flour that's not in jars? Up until now, I've done it in the sealable bags, but now I'm worried...

Shamrock1121
10-03-2008, 07:56 PM
Is there a way to vacuum pack flour that's not in jars? Up until now, I've done it in the sealable bags, but now I'm worried...

If you are using commercial white/unbleached flour, it keeps well at room temperature (or colder) in an air-tight container without vacuum-sealing it. *The shelf-life of commercial flour is 6-12 months, so I never suggest people store more commercial flour than what they can use in a year. *Old flour makes crappy baked goods *:P, which is why storing wheat for home-milled flour is best for longterm food storage. *

If you are near a Church of Latter Day Saints (LDS) Church that has a cannery, they put dry goods in #10 cans (the size of large coffee cans) and hermetically seal them shut with oxygen absorbers inside the can. *I'm not sure the shelf-life of flour in a can. *If I find a source for that information, I'll post it for you. *

-Karen

Shamrock1121
10-03-2008, 09:02 PM
TNDadX4 - I found the information and a web site that you may find useful.

"After seeds are broken open their outer shells can no longer protect the seed contents and seed nutrients start to degrade. Don't try to store unprotected flours longer than a year. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 5 years at a stable temperature of 70F. They should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures."

Source: http://standeyo.com/News_Files/Food/Extend_Shelf_Life.html

-Karen

leera
10-04-2008, 11:51 AM
Hmm.....maybe I've never left it sealed long enough for that problem,I only do it if I don't have enough empty jars.

I store all my dry goods in glass gallon jars unless my jars are full and I'm, out of room.I like to stock up when baking supplies are on sale in the fall.I've gotten flour for as cheap as $0.30 for 5lbs......

My wish list is a nice grinder for at home,but I don't have enough pennies saved for one yet.

I guess we've kind of gotten off the topic of noodles haven't we? :)

TNDadx4
10-06-2008, 04:11 PM
Karen,

Thanks for the info. I appreciate it :)

I have some bags to unseal and repackage :-/

jott
10-06-2008, 10:56 PM
So is the problem oxygen getting into the flour? Could you increase the storage life by putting oxygen absorbers into an air tight bucket, or purging it with another gas?

Shamrock1121
10-07-2008, 09:12 AM
So is the problem oxygen getting into the flour? Could you increase the storage life by putting oxygen absorbers into an air tight bucket, or purging it with another gas?

The problem is the moisture in the flour when it's packed tightly in a FoodSaver bag. When the oxygen is vacuumed out, the flour is no longer free-flowing, but a solid "block" of flour vacuum-sealed into a plastic bag. When it's packed tightly in the vacuum-sealed bag, the moisture in the flour will start to mildew.

This isn't the case when you vacuum-seal it in a canning jar or a FoodSaver canister. The oxygen is removed in those as well, but there is enough headspace that the flour isn't packed tightly like it is in a bag, and will flow freely - even without the oxygen.

The same goes for canning flour in #10 cans. It's oxygen-free (because of oxygen absorbers), but it's also free-flowing because of headspace remaining in the can after it's filled and sealed shut.

-Karen