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View Full Version : Chainsaws. Stihl or Husky?


Phil_Oz
01-05-2010, 06:16 AM
This seemed to be the best area for chainsaw discussions (since they are primarily used to cut fuelwood).

OK, being an Aussie, I'll have a different context to talk on about chainsaws than many Americans/Canadians would.

Our fuelwood is primarily hardwoods (eucalypt - 'gum trees') - which give the chains and bar a much harder time than pines etc would, being harder and more abrasive.

Here, you tend to favour either Stihls, or Husqvarnas.
Sure, there are many other brands available - Echos, Poulans, McCullocks, Homelites, Oleo Macs, etc. But they are considered '2nd tier' saws.

I have a Huskvarna 'Rancher' that I bought in 1986. It's had at least 3 bars, worn out more chains than I can count or remember, and sawn more tons of firewood than I care to remember.
(I'm lazier these days, and generally buy wood in for winter, but go back 10 years, and BiL and I spent many a weekend in the runup to our winter (June-August) getting in wood for our family heating).

I was wondering what your experiences with brands of saws are.

Also, many of us can recount some stories and near misses associated with chainsaws I would bet.

DM
01-05-2010, 12:46 PM
I used to be a Stihl guy, but i switched to Husqvarna some years ago. Both are excellent saws, and the best brand is the one that YOU have the BEST dealer for. The dealer makes all the difference!

Personally, i think what's more important with either brand, is to pick a PRO model saw, instead of a home owner model saw. That is if you want to have the longest lasting saw that can be rebuilt waaaaaaay on down the road when it needs it.

DM

Pokeberry Mary
01-05-2010, 01:46 PM
Hubby has personally killed hundreds of trees with his Stihl. Also took a nice little bite from his knee once. ;) He loves his Stihl--it was I think his 3rd saw.

LJH
01-05-2010, 03:59 PM
We have a Stihl 'Farm Boss' and I'd buy it again. We cut mostly white oak which is very hard, especially once dead. We heat with wood and cut several cords a year. That saw takes a beating and has never let us down. I should add that, with all our equipment, we are very diligent about cleaning and maintenance.

Lots of people in these parts cut firewood for a living and besides Stihls I see lots of Huskys and Poulans in their trucks. I think DM's advice is good; go to a dealer and get the best professional model for your particular tasks. Aside from not carrying the 1st tier saws, many of the 'associates' at the big box stores (Lowes, Home Depot, etc.) don't know their butts from a hot rock about the stuff they're selling.

Anon001
01-05-2010, 10:23 PM
I've had my Stihl for about 5 or 6 years. It has never let me down.... well... except when I ran over it. lol But, within a week, the place I used had it back in shape. Looked like new.

When I bought it, I was trying to decide between it or the Husqvarna. The only reason I went with Stihl was because there is a "service" center closer. For the Husq, I would have to drive 30 miles for repairs.

However, if my Stihl ever dies, I may try a Husqvarna.

Paul

cinok
01-06-2010, 12:23 AM
I run Stihl's have for years. I also used diposable saws when I had my own bussinness they where where good for limbing and I had a coupel of employees who could not keep track of where there head was never ming my good saws. I have also run huskies and was happy with performance and life but service was the problem. I just bought a farm boss 2 years ago and it is great had an small problem brought it to the dealer fixed it the same day. Husky has no support like Stihl around here.

AlchemyAcres
01-06-2010, 12:39 AM
I use whatever I can get for free or REAL cheap!

A lot of good saws go to the curb because a lot of people can't grasp the concept of simply changing the air filter, or a myriad of other minor issues!!!!!

I sold two good old Stihl's for $550 total last fall on eBay that I got from a neighbor who was ready to send them to the landfill!!!!! All I had to do to get them running good was new air filters and spark plugs!!!!

~Martin ;)

Phil_Oz
01-06-2010, 04:09 AM
Sometimes it's a bit hard to work out what's wrong, some folk have a throw-away mentality rather than fixing things.

My Husky at one stage would start, run a little while then stop, and was gutless if you actually tried to cut anything.

Ended up being a coked up or otherwise blocked muffler.

Had me going for a while though - I thought it was the plug, timing, something like that to start with.

Travis
01-06-2010, 04:19 AM
Service is key. Lucky for me I have Husqvarna and Stihl equally apart from me. Went Husqvarna because I got one very cheap. Now for chains I never sawed eucalyptus but I do know Oregon chain makes full carbide tooth chains fire rescue uses then to vent roofs. IMHO if a chain is designed to cut though a roof it may be hardy enough for most woods out there. I would get 1 chain made from this stuff and give it a try. I say 1 because these chains are exspensive.

http://www.baileysonline.com/itemdetail.asp?item=CB58%20375&productid=CB58+375&channelid=FROOG

http://www.rapcoindustries.com/

Never used Rapco but have used Baileys and great service, they are from the timber country of Northern California, original in a small town America.

As for accidents I wear chaps of ballistic kevlar will stop the largest saw made. Feet get steel toe boots.

DM
01-06-2010, 12:06 PM
Carbide chains are a "specialty" chain, and not only are they VERY expensive, they are kind of a throw away tool. By that i mean, if you hit anything really hard, and that at times includes a hard knot or stone, you will loose EXPENSIVE carbide off that chain. Also you can never get them as sharp as HSS either, so they don't cut as fast.

Fire & rescue workers, are not only spending YOUR money, they also know that a life is worth more than looseing a chain on a rescue.

I knows guys who have tried them for sawing dead and dirty wood, but i don't know anyone who stayed with one.

DM

roadking
01-06-2010, 11:01 PM
Have and use both; an 18" Husky for regular use, and a 30 year old Stihl AV 048 with 3foot bar. Only use the biggy on occassion due to it's size. Both are very reliable.

As for stories, the Stihl has, since day one, been known to wiggle the bar loose, and I'll leave it to your imagination as to why I always wear very sturdy trousers (or a cup) when operating it. It's more scary than painful...
Matt

Andy Jones
01-07-2010, 02:42 PM
I'm no expert by any means and can't comment on other saws,but my Stihl 034 has been a real gem for me.I bought it used 10 years ago,so I don't know how old it really is.I bought it after I moved to the country after I had trouble getting to work because the road was blocked by a fallen tree.I didn't use it very much,so it sat in my storage room until a couple of weeks ago,when I decided to cut some trees that were shading my garden.I know it hasn't been started in at least 5 years.Even with old gasoline in it,with about 6 or 7 pulls,it started and ran like it had been used every day.I topped the tank off with fresh gasoline and away I went.It works for me!

Andy

ShadowWolf
01-07-2010, 04:13 PM
I have cut wood for the last 6 years and have owned both. Both were reliable, but I would give the edge to a Husky. Most of the guys around here who cut timber all use Husky's.

Phil_Oz
01-07-2010, 09:09 PM
Husqvarna is owned by Electrolux. They have another brand of saw also - 'Jonsered'. Don't know if you have them in the US as well though. here they tend to be used by the pros.

There is also a Chines copy of the Husky. Cheap, and you can get them via ebay.
A mate (pal/buddy to you guys) has one for his small holding in our 'Blue Mountains' and is quite happy with it.

Think this is the one, there seem to be several brands same saw;
http://cgi.ebay.com.au/PRO-62CC-20-BAR-CHAINSAW-CHAIN-SAW-TRIPLE-SAFETY-PACK_W0QQitemZ160391479375QQcmdZViewItemQQptZAU_Ga rdening_Equipment?hash=item255813c04f

By the way, what do you guys use for chain lube? I use just supermarket 20W/50 oil and have had no problems.

DM
01-07-2010, 09:14 PM
Husqvarna is owned by Electrolux. They have another brand of saw also - 'Jonsered'.

They are the SAME saw, coming out of the same factory...

DM

Anon001
01-07-2010, 09:52 PM
By the way, what do you guys use for chain lube? I use just supermarket 20W/50 oil and have had no problems.

When using my Stihl, I only use their brand of bar and chain oil. If I had a cheapo, I most likely would use something cheaper.

Paul

Quietgentleman
01-07-2010, 10:20 PM
I run straight 30W oil for bar and chain oil. I've used it for years and it works great.

QGM

DM
01-07-2010, 10:57 PM
Many year ago i kept track of what worked better and what didn't, and there's no doubt in my mind that my chains lasted longer when i started using genuine bar & Chain lube.

I use a lot from a farm store here, or Husky bar oil. I just wait until it's on sale, and buy a few gallons.

DM

Clair_Schwan
03-17-2010, 02:30 AM
I've had good luck with Stihl, but tend to use anything that fits the work at hand. For cutting pallets and such, I have two 16 inch Poulan Wood Sharks, and they work very well for such light work. I picked one up at a garage sale for $10 because the owner had dulled the blade and tired of it.

Swede
03-17-2010, 06:55 PM
I've got both, including an odd assortment of others. They're both great saws, and I can't imagine that you would be disappointed with either one.

Having said that, some of the most well mannered saws I've used have been Homelites.

Swede

marshall
03-18-2010, 04:03 AM
I used to use all the cheap units like homelight, sears, etc.

Then a friend w/small engine shop got me a great deal on a stihl saw used. Works great, and is in a class by itself! Hear Huskies are in that same class too. never going back for firewood chores.

CB54BS
03-18-2010, 02:55 PM
I have a husky and my neighbor has a stihl and they both run great though I think his stihl may be a tad heavier.

Norcal Steve
04-13-2010, 01:36 AM
On the property, we have used the same Stihl saw for most all of the last twenty years. This saw was bought and used to clear most of the area around the house before we built. Today, we use it to cut mostly oak for fire wood and we also use the saw to cut and clear brush (Manzanita, Buck brush, Small oaks, Ponderosa pine and cedar) on the remaining ten acres. Tried and true. Of course we have gone thru several chains. The saw however keeps on going. Three pulls and its up and running. I sound like a commercial ad or something... but when something works then you should be proud to have it! :meeting:

Norcal Steve

Native87
04-13-2010, 09:24 AM
They are both great saws. I personally have used Stihl for years on a professional basis and the things are just down right reliable. I now own a Stihl and really am enjoying it. I also believe that one needs to have a great service center for whatever saw they have just in case of breakdown. The old 026 I have now is a wonderful saw. Been there and done that. I got tired of personally fooling with the other saws.

NHForester
04-21-2010, 12:33 PM
The majority of the loggers I work with run Husky's but there is a fair representation of Stihl and Johnsered. I prefer Huskies and even bought my wife a sewing machine made by the same company. :D

Bare
04-25-2010, 02:33 PM
I've owned a Stihl since the early 80s. It's been an outstanding saw. It's and 056 with a 3 foot bar and we use it for the big stuff and around here that's oak, eucalyptis, ash as well as an assortment of pines and others. I also own a small Poulan Pro which I've had for 10 years or so. I've done all the repairs and upkeep since I've owned them. Learned how when I was a kid on my Dad's dime. Friends have Huskies.

Several things to know. Dealers with parts and service and the will to service "oddball" saws and get parts for them is a must. All saws have power that deliver satisfaction. The key is in the bars and chains. My son can render a powerful, ripsnorting saw worthless. He thinks nothing of cutting dirt and gravel. Having a bar and chain in good working order as the manufacturer recommends is vital for any saw as well as having enough oil.

As far as performance is concerned, these port timed engines work the best. The reed valve engines do OK but not quite up to par with these port timed ones. Reed valve engines, such as the smaller Echoes are cheaper and there are some who prefer them for that reason. I would have a port timed engine in anything with a 16 inch bar or longer. Some of the smaller Stihls and Huskies are reed valve engines but I make no claims as to specifics.

And yes, my son is trained now and owns his own saw as well as borrowing my from time to time.:)

Hogtown
12-13-2010, 06:36 PM
I have a Stihl Farm Boss and a Stihl limb saw. They both appear to be bulletproof. They fire up after a pull or two and run all day without any problem. The only "special" care I give them is that I always use Sta-Bihl in the fuel. Having said that, my cousin has a Huskie and it has worked perfectly for nearly a decade. I don't think you can go wrong with either brand. As others have said, it probably boils down to which brand has the best dealer service in your area.

Helmar
01-26-2011, 01:58 AM
Both are good saws.
You, of course will get many people with different opinions about each one of them as well.
Some will get lemons, some not.

Good thing about that, you hear enough opinions, you will get to form your own.
Not all models are the same, some worse than others, some more dependable than others.

Just because it says Ford, does not make it the Lincoln Town car, it could be the Pinto of the line too. I would like to say you get what you pay for but not always true.

It always made sense to me to buy a saw that was a little more powerful than I needed. The seem to last longer as I was not pushing them..

Right now, we don't have a Husky dealer, we have Sthil dealer in this area.

For me, I would just go with what is more supported in your area between the two of them.

Helmar

offgridbob
01-27-2011, 12:54 PM
One thing I learned the hard way is keep the chain adjusted and sharp and most all of them work pretty good. With that said I have two Sthils, one big one and one smaller one for limbing and art work

Quietgentleman
01-27-2011, 04:24 PM
I have a small engine business and I can tell you when it comes to chainsaws. The majority of the work I do on them is due to lack of use. I am consistently cleaning out bad gas and plugged fuel line cause they have sat so long that all that's left in the tank is the 2 cycle oil. When it comes to sthils or husky the majority of the work I do on them is just sharpening the chain. And sense I got into bulk chain I'm making new chains for them. Mostly that's because it is the owners of these saws use them regularly and keep them in top shape and not forgot about in the shed.

QGM

10ecns
01-27-2011, 05:11 PM
My personal favorite is the Husky, but I would also be happy with a Stihl. Have owned a pile of Poulans in the past. They were inexpensive, and would, more or less, get the job done. However, I bought them knowing full well, that they were disposable saws. After a few seasons, they would shake themselves to pieces. At some point, I decided to make an actual investment in a serious saw. Took home the Husky, and fell in love the first time I fired it up. I would like to own a much larger Husky, for use with an Alaskan mill. Between that one, and the one I've already got, I should be in good shape for the rest of my wood cutting days

cubcadet
04-01-2011, 08:05 PM
Dealers will naturally push their product. I go for good price on items I see the pros use. I bought a Stihl 029 Farmboss 11 years ago for about $300. It used to go thru bars and chains, until I got the hang of rotating the bar every time I honed the chain teeth and letting the weight of the saw do most of the work. It all boils down to your wallet, mechanical skill, availability of knowledgeable dealers and repair shops and in my experience, the kind of wood you`re cutting. I`d stay away from the anti-kickback chain, using the semichisel I can work faster and eventually went for a bigger bar too. I clean the whole saw- the bar,chain groove, chain, clutch area with compressed air about every 2-3 sharpenings. The air filter element gets soaked in soapy water every spring and lightly scrubbed with an old toothbrush. One very important bit of technical info that I learned this year- if your saw is stalling out, check the fuel line going to the carb, if you can. Chances are, it`s cracked. This tip saved me about $100 or much more.
I am seriousely considering the Red Max line. I`ve been using their brand of leaf blower, mod. 7001 and it`s the absolute best. There`s a new dealer here in PA just opened up that carries the Red Max saws.

oldtimer
04-05-2011, 01:10 AM
I had my first Stihl chainsaw for twenty years before I wore it out. I now have a Stihl farmboss. You couldn't sell me on any other brand than Stihl.

J.R.
05-08-2011, 05:05 AM
My parents heated our home with wood exclusively for about twenty years.My dad had two poulan saws , a small limbsaw , a larger 20'' saw and we filled a 20'x40' shed to the rafters every year with those two saws.The saws were also meticulously maintained and kept sharp.

I have owned a stihl farmboss for about fifteen years without a minutes trouble out of it.Keep the air filter cleaned and the saw well oiled with clean gas and it will last decades.

kfander
05-13-2011, 10:38 PM
Don't buy a Craftsman. I didn't expect much, although Craftsman tools aren't bad, but what I got was a lot worse than I had anticipated.

My last chainsaw was an 18-inch Husqvarna. While it was smaller than I needed, it was a very good saw. Maintenance was a breeze, and I couldn't have asked for anything more dependable. Unfortunately, it burned in a fire while I was storing it at a friend's barn.

With costs mounting, and the list of things that I need far exceeding my ability to pay, I opted for a 20-inch Craftsman. That was a mistake.

The plastic housing was of the sort that I might expect to find in a toy. It came fully assembled. I checked it out, to be sure, and everything seemed to be in place, and the chain seemed to be adjusted properly. On my first small tree, the chain came off.

I learned that replacing the chain on a Craftsman was far more difficult than with the Husqvarna. Certainly, much of it will be a matter of getting used to a different saw, but I can remember the first time I replaced the chain on my Husqvarna, and it wasn't that hard.

Removing the clutch cover, I found that it was packed with pulp. Now, I understand that this stuff needs to be cleaned out, but this was one small tree, probably smaller than five inches in diameter, and it hadn't quite cut it down before the chain came off.

I spent a half hour cleaning pulp out of all of the crevices that it had gotten into, replaced the chain - yes, even reading the instructions - adjusted it, and cut two more small trees, only to have it come off again on the third one.

Now, I don't pretend to be a professional logger but I've cut several trees and cut up my share of firewood, and I don't ever remember my Husqvarna chain ever coming off. I had to adjust it periodically, especially when the chain was new, but it never came off while I was using it, and when I did remove it, it was to replace the chain, and it was a whole lot easier to accomplish than with the Craftsman.

On the positive side, it's very quiet for a chainsaw. Especially today, since I opted to use a hand saw and an axe instead.

cubcadet
05-14-2011, 04:35 PM
Don't buy a Craftsman. I didn't expect much, although Craftsman tools aren't bad, but what I got was a lot worse than I had anticipated.

My last chainsaw was an 18-inch Husqvarna. While it was smaller than I needed, it was a very good saw. Maintenance was a breeze, and I couldn't have asked for anything more dependable. Unfortunately, it burned in a fire while I was storing it at a friend's barn.

With costs mounting, and the list of things that I need far exceeding my ability to pay, I opted for a 20-inch Craftsman. That was a mistake.

The plastic housing was of the sort that I might expect to find in a toy. It came fully assembled. I checked it out, to be sure, and everything seemed to be in place, and the chain seemed to be adjusted properly. On my first small tree, the chain came off.

I learned that replacing the chain on a Craftsman was far more difficult than with the Husqvarna. Certainly, much of it will be a matter of getting used to a different saw, but I can remember the first time I replaced the chain on my Husqvarna, and it wasn't that hard.

Removing the clutch cover, I found that it was packed with pulp. Now, I understand that this stuff needs to be cleaned out, but this was one small tree, probably smaller than five inches in diameter, and it hadn't quite cut it down before the chain came off.

I spent a half hour cleaning pulp out of all of the crevices that it had gotten into, replaced the chain - yes, even reading the instructions - adjusted it, and cut two more small trees, only to have it come off again on the third one.

Now, I don't pretend to be a professional logger but I've cut several trees and cut up my share of firewood, and I don't ever remember my Husqvarna chain ever coming off. I had to adjust it periodically, especially when the chain was new, but it never came off while I was using it, and when I did remove it, it was to replace the chain, and it was a whole lot easier to accomplish than with the Craftsman.

On the positive side, it's very quiet for a chainsaw. Especially today, since I opted to use a hand saw and an axe instead.

I would think that the Craftsman saws of times past were better, like the old Homelites. I have 3 of thos old beauties.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9MygbMo6dYk

kfander
05-16-2011, 03:36 AM
That's an interesting video.

Naughty_Pines
05-16-2011, 09:26 PM
There was a professional Tree Care company across the street today cutting down dead branches for our electric company. The guys were about 100 feet up in the air. They were using Stihl MS 200 T.
They brought up a truck with about a 200 foot hydraulic boom on it so I would guess they use the best equipment.

Just for your information for what it's worth.

Phil_Oz
06-09-2011, 04:42 AM
The professional tree fellers and loppers are in a class of their own compared to we mere mortals who just cut a bit of firewood. Found these guys on YouTube. FWIW they seem to be very much into Stihls.

They seem to be equally at home with a chainsaw, heights, and a rigging harness and lines;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_aGHRxOqCo&feature=autoplay&list=UL3BDxguqXEJg&index=3&playnext=3

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9B_DmVexPh4&feature=autoplay&list=UL3BDxguqXEJg&index=1&playnext=1

Found this bit interesting - absolutely no fear of heights there!;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u3kW3p8IEEs&feature=autoplay&list=UL3BDxguqXEJg&index=4&playnext=4

Equilibrium
06-10-2011, 04:20 PM
Female thoughts.... Men who use chainsaws in my circles all rave about Huskies and swear by them. Most won't buy any brand but a Husky. My husband also has a large Husky which.... is barely used. It's old but it starts every time without protest. I've never used it. I picked it up and realized immediately it was going to be too much chainsaw for me. But again... it's a great chainsaw that my dad used for 10 years that he then gave to us that's given us no problems what so ever in the 10 years we've had it.
--
I use a Stihl MS200 T. It was the best Mother's Day gift I ever got. It's just the right size for me although to this day I can't start it myself. I also have an electric Milwaukee chainsaw. Great little electric chainsaw as far as electric chainsaws go that I can start on my own but.... I won't use it unless there's nobody around to start my Stihl. I can't take down large trees with either of them but then.... I wouldn't feel comfortable downing anything greater in height than say.... 75' and when they start getting larger than 40' or so.... I switch to one of my husband's smaller McCullochs (sp?). The McCullochs aren't as large as the Husky but they're larger than my Stihl. I can't work with them for very long but I can last about a half hour which is more than enough time to down a larger caliper tree or two.
--
Hearing protection..... I always wear it these days... no sense losing more of what little I've got left. Chaps... for sure. They're a good investment just like steel toed shoes are and.... we can get steel toed shoes.... we don't have to buy work boots to get that type of protection. Goggles.... sometimes. I should get in the habit of wearing eye protection more.
--
I think I bought a gallon of Ace's house brand of bar oil the last time. I buy what ever brand's on sale. I haven't noticed a difference in the way my chainsaw operates based on bar oil.
--
I think the most important thing would be to buy a quality brand from a reputable dealer that's close by. For us, that's Stihl. The Husky we have was given to us by my dad because he was too old to be using it safely any longer.... the closest Husky dealer that repairs them is well over an hour away... we'd definitely buy that brand again if there was a closer repair shop. Anywho.... another really important thing for women would be to not buy more chainsaw than we can reasonably handle. No chain saw is going to do anyone any good if it isn't a good "fit". Too heavy or too large and our arms will tire in all of about 10 minutes and we'll be at risk of injuring ourselves.
--
What ever chainsaw we buy.... it's probably a good idea to have the chain sharpened regularly and tightened properly and definitely have some one teach us how to use it or take the classes if we haven't already learned. I took the classes. Flunked the 1st time... passed the 2nd time I re-took them. Don't give up.
--
I've downed around 8,000 trees in the past 10 years. That's not a typo.... you can go a lot faster with a chainsaw than a bow saw especially when there's people cutting the trunk down to more manageable sizes and hauling away the limbs. Not one injury yet probably because I've never lost the fear of chainsaws that stopped me from passing my classes the 1st time I took them. I'm more comfortable with being uncomfortable with a chainsaw but to this day I still won't bite off more than I can chew. I leave the bigguns to the men with "manlier" chainsaws. Women can successfully use chainsaws.... I don't know why more won't try. When I volunteer for the state.... the men good naturedly fight over getting me on their crew. I kid you not... they'll flip coins to see which crew gets me. At 1st I thought they were joking to make me feel good since I flat out refuse to even attempt to take down anything over 75' (preferably no greater in height than 50') but..... it's my size that's desirable. My weight distribution is so different than theirs and I'm small so I can get into areas to clear access for them with my Stihl that would really strain their backs. It's really hard on the guys lugging around their mammoth sized Huskies when they've got to maneuver through buckthorn/multiflora rosa/Japanese Honeysuckle/Asian Bittersweet/etc. They're top heavy.... all their body weight's above their waist so a "bottom heavy" female is a good thing.... even if she won't tackle a 100+ footer.

potterhenry
06-12-2011, 11:37 AM
Can anybody recommend a lumber maker for one of these saws?...thanks

Equilibrium
06-13-2011, 02:50 PM
The same guys who swear by Huskies swear by Alaskan lumber makers. I heard they were over $100 but…. they say they save themselves beaucoup bucks using them... I wouldn't know... I don't have one. I do have some of their lumber. They’re all rough sawn if that matters to you. They're real 4x4s and real 2x6s and I can't see where it'd matter whether lumber was rough sawn or not if it's being used for construction but it's probably not a good idea to mix say.... the 2x4s that are made using a lumber maker with 2x4s from Home Depot because the 2x4s at Home Depot are more like 1 3/4"x3 1/2" if that makes any sense to you. It threw off one of my raised vegetable beds mixing in planks that were store bought with the left overs that were given to me. I had to rip the bed apart. The planks given to me wouldn't fit in the floor joist hangers I'd attached to the 4x4s for a clean "look".

potterhenry
06-13-2011, 11:00 PM
thanks, doesn't matter to be rough....I have a good size bench planer....

JohnNH
06-22-2011, 11:58 PM
I have never owned/used either brand. Both my saws are Jonsereds (625 & 2054 models). That being said, I would like to hear from any of you folks that have experience with using Stihl's Farm Boss model. Your feedback would be appreciated.

Phil_Oz
06-23-2011, 05:45 AM
I have never owned/used either brand. Both my saws are Jonsereds (625 & 2054 models). That being said, I would like to hear from any of you folks that have experience with using Stihl's Farm Boss model. Your feedback would be appreciated.

Jonsered is owned by Husqvarna;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Husqvarna_AB

http://corporate.husqvarna.com/index.php?p=press&s=press_releases&t=detail&afw_id=1171874&afw_lang=en

Jonsereds are seen as 'Professional' versions of Huskies here. I'm told that Huskies and Jonsereds are assembled on the same assembly lines, and that many parts are interchangable.

JohnNH
06-24-2011, 12:18 AM
Wasn't aware of that. . .Am still interested in hearing from folks who own or have owned the Stihl Farm Boss model.

potterhenry
06-24-2011, 04:05 AM
me too...needing one soon