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JasonE
04-17-2010, 10:40 PM
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c222/jakers27/IMG_0257-1.jpg
I was amazed to discover last night that less than one inch of rain filled it to overflowing (into the diverter and the drain pipe). This is one one of four downspouts on my house. Imagine what a barrel on each could do! Its easy to see how someone in a temperate climate could live off of just rain catch.

Jason

Old Rusty
04-18-2010, 12:50 AM
Good idea Jason. Where did you find the fitting for your downspout that feeds your barrel? Thanks .

JasonE
04-18-2010, 01:43 AM
Hey Old Rusty

Its made by Fiskars. I found it on ebay by chance and have not found one there since. I assume it was from a kit where the barrel and diverter were both Fiskars but someone decided they didn't need the diverter and sold it. You can buy them online (just not Fiskars that I know of) for about 25 bucks. Just search rainwater diverter.

This one is pretty nice in that there are no moving parts. There is simply an overflow chamber that works off of backpressure. It seems to work pretty well right now.

Jason

Old Rusty
04-19-2010, 01:53 AM
Thanks Jason. I will look for them.

12vman
04-20-2010, 01:25 AM
This is my rain barrel.. ;)

http://img33.imageshack.us/img33/7906/20030228spring00149io.jpg

Laura
04-20-2010, 10:17 AM
I saw rain barrels for sale at the store the other day......100.00 each.

Where would I look to find a barrel (that has not had hideous toxic chemicals in it) cheap or free?

Anon001
04-20-2010, 03:43 PM
Laura,

Have you tried Craig's List for your area? You can post a "wanted" ad. There is a man not too far from me that sells them for $10.00 each that had food grade items in them.

I use a 1500 gallon tank and two 300 gallon tanks, but it is also the only water source I use for the house.

Paul

NHForester
04-20-2010, 03:47 PM
Thanks for the great tip, Jason. I did a rain barrel a couple of years ago but the water ended up being all full of algae. Your closed design is a much better system.

Laura
04-20-2010, 09:24 PM
Thank you Paul! I will list a wanted!!
Laura

Edited to say: I looked on Craigs list and there is an ad for someone selling a food grade rain barrel with a spickot and the attachment for the gutter, for 60.00 each. Is this high?
Thanks

JasonE
04-21-2010, 12:32 AM
Hey 12vman, cool tank. Much bigger scale. I need that!

NHForester--thank you. OCD is a valuable tool sometimes.

Jason

12vman
04-23-2010, 06:01 PM
I found these. Kinda cool.. ;)

http://www.heartlandamerica.com/browse/item.asp?product=74-gallon-collapsible-rain-barrel&PIN=88083&&BC=40004011&DL=SCH18

Mark
04-24-2010, 12:03 AM
" less than one inch of rain filled it to overflowing"

:eek:

I might need to plan for more overflow than I thought....

Has anyone on here ever used the formula I've seen floating around the internet about guesstimating rainwater yield? I think it was something like...
Roof Sq Ft X inches of rain X .6 = gallons?

I am wondering if I can count on it's accuracy...

JasonE
04-25-2010, 06:14 PM
" less than one inch of rain filled it to overflowing"

:eek:

I might need to plan for more overflow than I thought....

Has anyone on here ever used the formula I've seen floating around the internet about guesstimating rainwater yield? I think it was something like...
Roof Sq Ft X inches of rain X .6 = gallons?

I am wondering if I can count on it's accuracy...


Mark

I haven't seen that to judge its accuracy but it seems like there SHOULD be a formula out there that can be used.

J

Prairie
04-25-2010, 07:38 PM
Volume = area x height, but it also depends on the wind and direction the rain is falling. And area ia level area, square footage of the house, as opposed to square footage of a pitched roof. Not sure how to convert inches and sq.ft. into gallons, but cm^2 x cm = litres. ;)

Bazza
07-31-2010, 08:03 AM
Now if you were to convert to the metric system you would know that for every millimetre of rain that fell on each square metre of roof area you would collect one litre of water.

Interesting to hear about and see some of the containers you save rain water into. We have two 31,700 litre (8,374 US gal) plastic water tanks and a 22,750 litre (6,010 US gal) galvanised iron tank as well as several smaller ones that we collect our rain water into. In total we have about 100,000 litres (26,417 US gal) of rain water storage.

At any given time we have enough water in storage to last us for over two years of normal use and if things got really tough we could make that eke out a lot longer.

We also have a 22,750 litre concrete tank in which we store some dam water that is then fed back onto the gardens and orchard. Our total dam storages when full would allow us to grow all of our food crops, vegetables and fruit as well as water our poultry for a year and still have some left over.

Water is an asset that should be saved at every opportunity and not be squandered.

Between one and a half and one point six of one percent of the earths total water is potable. As the earths population increases that amount of potable water per person decreases.

The amount of ground water that is being depleted at the present time in order to grow crops cannot be sustained. One only has to look at Saudi Arabia where they have installed centre pivot irrigation systems to help irrigate grain crops. The water being pumped from the artesian bores has been there for some hundreds of years and being a country with a very limited rainfall it may take many hundreds of years to replace what has already been used at their current annual rainfall.

Many other countries have also seriously depleted many of their artesian water systems and the sad part is that the crops grown are mainly fed to animals which in turn are processed to feed to humans.

It would be fair to say that peak water is here and will be with us for a long time to come.

Aamylf
07-31-2010, 11:37 AM
One inch of rain on one square foot of roof yields 1/2 gallon of water

or so says one web site. So our 1500 sq. ft. roof would give me 750 gallons everytime it rained an inch. We use about 1500 gallons a month, so 2" of rain would keep us going. I live in SWFL where that usually happens even in the dry season.

Check with your county to see if they sell rain barrels. I was amazed to find ours did, $40 for 55 gallon with all the fitting and hoses to tie as many together as you want, spigot and all. Not free, but better than the prices on the web. I can toss them in the back of the pickup and away we go.

WVMan73
07-31-2010, 03:55 PM
I found these. Kinda cool.. ;)

http://www.heartlandamerica.com/browse/item.asp?product=74-gallon-collapsible-rain-barrel&PIN=88083&&BC=40004011&DL=SCH18

I've seen those on a few other sites, 12v. I really wonder how well they hold up over time. I like the idea that they could be collapsed and put away in the winter or moved fairly easily if one wished to. And the price sure isn't bad either. Most rain barrels I've seen are much higher than that one, though I would assume that a hard plastic barrel would last longer.

If anyone has any experience with those barrels, please post your thoughts on them. I'm sure we'd all love to hear what you think. :)

WVMan73

jhnpldng
11-21-2010, 12:42 PM
Here's a pretty good page on rainwater harvesting and you can go to www.city-data.com to find your annual or monthly rainfall amount.
http://rainwater.sustainablesources.com/#catchment

S2man
11-21-2010, 10:18 PM
That style of rainwater diverter can be found at gardeners.com (http://www.gardeners.com/Downspout-Diverter/33-991,default,pd.html) for $29.95