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logansackett
05-07-2008, 10:15 PM
I would like to homestead, but how? Where? I live in Colorado. Can I homestead here?

beekeeper
05-08-2008, 12:20 AM
Yes you can.

We each go into it in our own method.

We searched for over a decade looking at areas, shopping for land. We have seen a lot of properties, we needed to find an area that fit us.

Perhaps Colorado fits you.

logansackett
05-08-2008, 12:43 AM
So homesteading is not the same as it was, now it means finding land that is suitable for a good price? I would think that it would be wise to find a group of like minded people and get property close together. Then as clair was describing in her article you have a diverse group that knows many different things thereby being in a position to help one another.

Deberosa
05-08-2008, 12:59 AM
Hi,

I used to live in Wheat Ridge in Colorado. Glad to be out of there! I left in 1999 - just before the severe limitations on water went into effect so I was able to turn much of my lawn into gardens. A garden wouldn't survive much anymore with limited water plus you can't catch rain water.

But about homesteading. You can start anywhere, it's more of a mind set to me. Planting some veggies, growing some chickens if possible, getting out of debt and living simply. You can do most of that anywhere. If you have land you have the luxury of growing more of your own food. The Denver area was just getting too crowded for me - with the limits on water and wood heat and the head aches I would get from the polution it was getting pretty bad. At least Arvada has some larger lots for the houses in some of the older areas...

Anyhow - welcome - check out the forums here. Maybe you start by baking your own bread. That you can do in the city and Shamrock is a wealth of information for that!

logansackett
05-08-2008, 01:13 AM
Did you stay in Co.? I really love the things this state has to offer. The weather, the views, the mountains. I would like to find land here. I am thinking about northwest for practicality even though southwest is some of the pretiest country I have ever seen.

Deberosa
05-08-2008, 01:21 AM
I ended up in Washington state, only because that is where the job took me and now I am pretty much rooted here. ;-)

I liked the Colorado Springs area also - but the work took me a different direction. However I've crossed the Denver area off of my list for good!

Steve_L
05-09-2008, 03:19 PM
There is an interesting article on cheap land in this Backwood's Home website article:
http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/cournoyer0802.html

Summary of what I thought were the important points:
1) if there are good jobs in communting distance, the land will be too expensive.
2) Cheap land in Northern states from the Dakotas to Maine.
3) Farther north, the cheaper land is.
4) Alaska and states west of the Rockies are expensive.
5) Reasonable prices in South Eastern US, the Midwest, and parts of Texas and Oklahoma. Look at a map for places where there are no cities in commuting distance. (see point 1)

Jackie Clay wrote in her starting over articles that she found a place in Minnesota. That's keeping with rules 2 & 3.

I like snow. I hope I can convince my wife to go for the North. She said Alaska, but Alaska is against rule 4.

I want chickens, a fish pond, rabbit hutches, a half acre vegie garden, a woodlot of 10 acres or so, a patch of land for growing chicken feed, alfalfa patch, wheat and oat patch, and enough pasture for mini cows or goats.

Some soil diversity, from good garden soil to some clay and rocks, would be a plus.

And I want to be able to build outbuildings without to go to local governments to get permission. *Building permits where I live are expensive and take forever.

pcrowder
05-09-2008, 09:21 PM
I live in extreme Northeastern Colorado. There are alot of small farms out our way and the prices aren't too bad (yet). The only drawback is the cost of fuel :o, and the distance you have to drive to go anywhere. We are 36 mi round trip from the closest little grocery store, hardware store, and doctor. I came from a suburb of Denver, so it was a bit of a shock to drive so far. But yes, you can homestead in Colorado. I would stay away from the western slope, though - extremely expensive, as we found out when we started looking. Good luck, and I hope you find the place of your dreams!

kawalekm
05-10-2008, 12:59 PM
You'd be surprised! I wouldn't discount entire states just because they're in the west or whatever. We're here in California, one of the most densely populated states in the country and we still found a parcel of land we're happy with. Here's a pic to give you a sense of what the land looks like.
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r55/kawalekm/MichaelsLibertyApple.jpg Our homestead is about 50 acres in size, get about 20-22 inches of rain per year, and naturally supports oak woodland and ponderosa pine. We can't see a neighbor from anywhere on the property, though the nearest neighbors have a cabin about 1/4 mile from us.

How did we find a piece of property like this in a state like California? Well, it's 20 miles up a dirt mountain road, and there's no electricity, running water, or sewage. No Starbucks to be found anywhere! We found the property through an agricultural realtor. I would recommend you avoid regular city realtors and any advertising that they specialize in vacation properties. Find one that deals primarily with commercial farm and ranch properties. All our neighbors here are cattle ranchers, and that the type of people our realtor deals with on a daily basis.

I think you should be able to find something in Colorado if you search in the right places. You must pay attention to the other posters cautions about water, and also legal access. Those are the most critical aspects of evaluating a property for sale.
Michael

logansackett
05-10-2008, 01:01 PM
Thanks for all the information. I will be checking the Backwoods websight. I would very much like to stay in colorado, so I guess I am on the right track by going north. I am looking to be a little closer to the mountains though.

ASG
05-13-2008, 05:26 PM
4) Alaska and states west of the Rockies are expensive.
5) Reasonable prices in South Eastern US, the Midwest, and parts of Texas and Oklahoma. Look at a map for places where there are no cities in commuting distance. (see point 1)

Jackie Clay wrote in her starting over articles that she found a place in Minnesota. That's keeping with rules 2 & 3.

I like snow. I hope I can convince my wife to go for the North. She said Alaska, but Alaska is against rule 4.

Not all of Alaska is expensive. You can also get land without property taxes in parts of Alaska (currently anyways) so that saves money too. Avoid the areas close to Anchorage and Fairbanks, and the Southeast for the most part, and there is very affordable land. Of course if you buy fly-in only land in the bush the transportation costs can add up, but there are good deals even with road access.

bookwormom
05-13-2008, 06:13 PM
do a google on ' Sepp Holzer Krameterhof'. Very impressive what he does/ has done on a steep mountain side.. way up there.

logansackett
05-18-2008, 10:18 PM
I have been looking around at different properties here in colorado, one thing I have found is that it is dang near imposable to get water and mineral rights with your land.
I dont want to have my 5 acres destoyed because some a@@wipe thinks there might be oil there and he owns the mineral rights.

oldman60
06-06-2008, 10:23 PM
I'm just beginning to explor this and I'd like to tag along on this exchange since I have the same question. Currently I live in western Washington and I would need to do a lot of research before I made any moves. I'm here to learn all I can from people who are really engaged in this.

Thanks in advance

Deberosa
06-07-2008, 01:05 AM
I'm just beginning to explor this and I'd like to tag along on this exchange since I have the same question. *Currently I live in western Washington and I would need to do a lot of research before I made any moves. *I'm here to learn all I can from people who are really engaged in this. *

Thanks in advance


Hello, there are other western Washington folks here - I am outside of Shelton on the peninsula. What part are you in? I have a great realtor friend who keeps me informed though e-mail on new homesteads as they come on the market. There are starting to be some deals around in this economy.

Debbie

countryjo
06-07-2008, 04:42 AM
Hi. I'm in Central Wa. and we have irrigated property, depends what your looking for.... but deals come around. There are properties with or without irrigation. You can irrigate one acre off your well. Some people just want alot of land and keep one acre nice.
Best wishes finding a place.

oldman60
06-07-2008, 07:49 PM
I'm not looking for a large tract of land. I want something managable and I am not one of those who doesn't want to be seen by neighbors. I would like to produce most of what my partner and I would need to sustain a healthy diet and feed for some chickens and a few goats. It would be great if we had some to barter with but that is secondary. I don't want to have issues getting enough water but I think I could do pretty well in western WA with catching and storing rainfall along with well water. I don't know how much land this will take but 10 acres sounds reasonable with a small house, bard and so on.

HockeyFan
06-08-2008, 11:40 PM
Educate yourself and start "doing". Whatever you do, is a start and you can build from there. Whatever you do is more than most people are doing and you'll be that much better off. As you learn, do more and refine what you've been doing. It gets better and better.

I think that's really how most homesteaders do it. Few were born and raised on a homestead and just grew into it from birth. Most all of us have learned as we go.

Duchesse
06-18-2008, 06:33 PM
Start where you are. *I live in the New York City and I'm a homesteader. *I'm waiting for my *youngest son to graduate from high school before I make my move to the country.

Even so, I have a square foot (Mel Bartholomew) kitchen garden with tomatoes, green peppers, hot pepper, collards, cabbage, corn, mint, thyme, sage, lavender, scallions, turnips, bok choy, *cilantro, chives, basil, arugula, watermelon, cucumber, snap peas, romaine, and I have a pear tree and 2 blackberry bushes I can harvest from. *I have 4 pygmy does ,a pygmy buck (I'm an outlaw. ;D) and next spring I will be getting 2 hens and a rooster.(I told you I'm an outlaw ;D. *

walls0stone
06-18-2008, 08:03 PM
no matter were you move to, somone posted 10 things to know about moving and I think it was a good post. Give a look at those, cuz fitting in can make a lot of diffrance.

Dutches, how did you learn to garden in NYC?

Suzy
06-24-2008, 11:38 AM
You can start "homesteading" ANY WHERE because it is a mind set as much as anything else!!!!

If you have to relocate, MAKE CERTAIN there are no land restirctions on your land, check with the county and any local newspapers about what FUTURE land restrictions may be coming, etc. etc. etc.

The further you can get from metropolitan areas, the better off you are!

But anyone can homestead to a point, just about anywhere. Start by paying off as much of your debt as you can....you can be much more self sufficient if you're not having to work outside jobs just to pay down debts.

Try to eat local fresh foods and that will help keep you healthier....grow as much of your food as you can....even if you are in an apartment you can grow sprouts on your kitchen cabinet, tomatoes in a five gallon bucket, etc.

Try to recycle your things as much as possible. Too much of our "buying" now is because we are such a throw-away society....

Read every anthology BWH has and get every back issue of COUNTRYSIDE you can get your hands on!!!!

I will not be without my subscriptions to BWH and COUNTRYSIDE even if I have to do without something else because they SAVE me money!!!! Also Carla Emery's Encyclopedia of Country Living will answer many many questions about just about every area of the homesteading life.

Learn as many skills as you can. The more you can do for yourself, the less you'll have to pay other people to do!!!!! Also learn about bartering! The older MOTHER EARTH NEWS has a wonderful column called something like Bartering and bootstraps or something like that....there's also columns on starting your own business....

best wishes!!!!

gentlehorse
06-24-2008, 07:06 PM
Greetings; I know a lot has been said about the land, in getting the right land for the right price. My thoughts are more on what do you do when you have found the right land. What is oneís steps in working toward a homestead that in a few years one can set back and say, Iím seeing my homestead come together. I know some folks want to be off the grid while other donít want to go that far. I guess my question is after the land is secured and your standing there looking over your land, what is your first, second, third, etc. steps to becoming a homesteader.
Thanks for your comments.
Doug

humbug
06-25-2008, 02:36 AM
I think the question to ask yourself..is what does homesteading mean to you? Being completely self sufficient? I think there are very few people who are able to do this. Most people also hold down other jobs...
How much are you able to take on? Most things will take more time than you think they will, will you have help?
Self sufficiency is a mind set. If I don't know how to do something ..I believe I can learn and do it myself. There are some things I prefer to leave to the professionals.
For me, time is an issue. How much can I get done? Gardening, taking care of animals, cutting firewood, and all the projects around the homestead take an incredible amount of time.
You can homestead anywhere, it is just a matter of adapting where you live to your chosen homesteading lifestyle.

RobertRogers
06-26-2008, 07:37 PM
Yes, I've found in cold regions (must be non-ski area) land is generally cheaper.

livinlite
09-08-2008, 01:37 PM
Hello, there are other western Washington folks here - I am outside of Shelton on the peninsula. *What part are you in? *I have a great realtor friend who keeps me informed though e-mail on new homesteads as they come on the market. *There are starting to be some deals around in this economy.

Debbie

Could you PM me your Realtor's info if you don't mind?

We are starting to look for land nearish to Port Townsend (my fiance grew up there, her Grandpa had a large farm/homestead in Chimacum...sadly gone now). Our friends live a little bit outside of town on 5ish acres and we'd like to end up somewhere closish to them...within biking distance (5-15 miles) if possible. My fiance also lived in Quilcene/Brinnon for a while, but that might be a fit further than we're looking.

Ideally we'd find land that was partially cleared or even mostly cleared and then plant some fast growing alders or the like for privacy still leaving the sunlight for the garden/greenhouse. Trying to do as much learning as possible now before we get to the point of purchase.

And who knows, maybe we can talk the friends into letting us build small on their land and making a mini-commune ;D

roolu
09-19-2008, 04:23 PM
Wow, you all have really given me some good ideas. I live on a rental property and flower boxes would be great for herbs and veggies. I might get away with a tree or two also. Thanks for all your input on here everyone. God bless.

cinok
09-19-2008, 04:52 PM
Before you start you should have some idea on how you would like it to end