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daffodil
06-06-2010, 10:28 AM
Ok, this probably sounds stupid but how do I use the rain water for the laundry? In another thread someone mentioned washing with it and I thought I would have to hand wash everything but someone posted I could still use my washer with it. Do I just pour it in until it reaches a certain point and shut the other water off to it or ??? And is it clean enough to rinse with too or do I just use it for the wash cycle? Mine looked a bit yuk in the barrel. I still need to put a screen over the top of it to catch the debris from the roof. I don't want to break the washer, won't be saving anything that way:).

12vman
06-06-2010, 11:04 AM
What kind of washer do you have? An automatic could be a p.i.t.a. to use.

I use a wringer washer and it's a piece of cake.

Anon001
06-06-2010, 12:36 PM
I also have a wringer washer and two washtubs set on stands next to it. It saves on a lot of water, and the wringer washer gets dirty farm clothes cleaner than anything else I've ever used.

Paul

daffodil
06-06-2010, 12:54 PM
What kind of washer do you have? An automatic could be a p.i.t.a. to use.

I use a wringer washer and it's a piece of cake.

I have a top load automatic.

daffodil
06-06-2010, 12:59 PM
I also have a wringer washer and two washtubs set on stands next to it. It saves on a lot of water, and the wringer washer gets dirty farm clothes cleaner than anything else I've ever used.

Paul

I don't have much room. About 38" of space to put it in. Mine sucks actually. The agitator hardly moves and it doesn't clean the clothes well at all. I have to double rinse alot of things, they still have soap on them after the rinse. I was thinking of investing in a new one but they are so expensive. How do those ringer washers work? And how much do they cost?

I do alot of laundry with the pets. It is the one convenience I really like having. I can do without the dryer and stoves but I like the washer:).

Anon001
06-06-2010, 01:23 PM
I use mine outside. I bet 12vman does too. I think I've seen his setting outside in one of his pics posted on here.

How much do they cost? A new one is about $1000. I bought an old used one.

It was in the newspaper, listed with garage sale stuff and looked almost new. They wanted $10. It was in the basement. I told him if I had to carry it out of the basement, I should get it for $5. Well... I got if for $5. That was probably about 1998 or 1999?

Paul

daffodil
06-06-2010, 01:31 PM
I use mine outside. I bet 12vman does too. I think I've seen his setting outside in one of his pics posted on here.

How much do they cost? A new one is about $1000. I bought an old used one.

It was in the newspaper, listed with garage sale stuff and looked almost new. They wanted $10. It was in the basement. I told him if I had to carry it out of the basement, I should get it for $5. Well... I got if for $5. That was probably about 1998 or 1999?

Paul

I remember seeing one at an antique store where I used to live (over 2 hours away) for $15. Said it worked. Wish I would have bought it. I found this one on craigs list. But they want $200.
http://youngstown.craigslist.org/atq/1777118885.html

Here's another for $40 http://cleveland.craigslist.org/atq/1761461083.html

I could set up in my shed. They hook to electric though don't they? Could I use an extension cord?

Anon001
06-06-2010, 01:36 PM
Yes, they are electric. However, they also made a lot of them that used gas motors that you started with a kick starter you stepped on. I would stick with the electric one. Be sure to make sure it works.... the agitator and the wringer before you buy one.

Paul

DavidOH
06-06-2010, 01:46 PM
$200 is a bargan. If you want it get it.

Lehmans wants $899 for new. Plus $175 delivery.
http://www.lehmans.com/store/Appliances___Practical_Appliances___Electric_Appli ances___115V_Home_Queen_Wringer_Washer_with_Stainl ess_Tub___32901100?Args=


A friend of mine will not part with his even though it's 50 years old and he doesn't use it.

daffodil
06-06-2010, 02:52 PM
I use mine outside. I bet 12vman does too. I think I've seen his setting outside in one of his pics posted on here.

How much do they cost? A new one is about $1000. I bought an old used one.

It was in the newspaper, listed with garage sale stuff and looked almost new. They wanted $10. It was in the basement. I told him if I had to carry it out of the basement, I should get it for $5. Well... I got if for $5. That was probably about 1998 or 1999?

Paul

How do you use them outside in the winter?

Anon001
06-06-2010, 04:14 PM
How do you use them outside in the winter?

I only use it outside in the summer. In the winter, I set it beside the bath tub with one washtub in the bathtub.

Paul

DM
06-06-2010, 06:58 PM
One of the most happy days of my mothers life was when dad got rid of the ringer washers, and bought her an automatic washer! To this day, i can still remember how excited she was... lol

DM

Pokeberry Mary
06-06-2010, 08:12 PM
I was thinking of the same thing all the while I was reading. How Gramma and Mom did laundry in the basement with a ringer washer and how Mom would always scold us not to get our fingers near it, and how thrilled she was to get an automatic finally.

For that matter, they used to get coal delivered and it would go down a chute into a room in the basement and Mom would be mortified that the neighbors could see it. LOL.. Too funny.

It was dirty though, and that furnace was always being fiddled with by Grampa. Mom always thought it was going to explode. :)

12vman
06-06-2010, 08:38 PM
One can save a lot of water if you use a wringer washer the proper way. Lightly soiled stuff first. (towels, undergarments, ect..) jeans, T-shirts, ect.. Rugs or heavily soiled things last, from the same washer load of water. Might change the rinse water after the second load but you're only changing around 25-30 gallons instead of 60-75! 3 loads in a standard automatic washer @ 30 gal./tub full can use 180 gal.! (60 gal./load)

When you don't have a limitless supply of water, this is a big consideration. In my case, it works well for me.

I cheat in the winter. I have a laundrymat just up the road.. ;)

NCLee
06-06-2010, 08:45 PM
Daf, I helped my Mom with the laundry, using a wringer washer, until I got married. At one time, it sat on a screened backporch. We moved and the washer went into a farm shed near the house.

It did run on electricity. If you get an electric one, find the plate that gives the amp draw. Size your extension cord so that you're pulling about 80% of the maximum load the cord will draw. You'll probably need one that's rated for 15 amps with 12 ga wire.

To use it, fill with water, not all the way to the top, as you have to add the clothing. Add your detergent. Engage the dasher and let it wash for as long as you think that load of clothing needs agiation (sp). Stop the dasher and start the ringer. Pull an item from the washer and start an edge of it through the ringer. Be careful and keep your fingers out of that wringer. With something like a sheet, try to find the edge of the long end. Start feeding that through leaving the bottom of the sheet in the washer. The wringer will gradually pull the sheet through.

From time to time with heavy or thick items you may need to assist. Start the item through the wringer. Then go around to the backside and GENTLY pull the item through. Our wringer had an emergency bar. Hit that and the wringer would stop and the rollers would spring apart on one end. Two purposes. One was to get your hand, hair, etc out if caught. The other was to get out something that wrapped itself around the wringer or jammed in it.

We set tubs behind the washer. The one directly behind it was for rinsing. As the wringer pulled the items through, they'd drop into the rinse tub. Along side the rinse tub, we sat a bleach tub. This was rinse water with a little Clorox in it. To get from the rinse tub to the Clorox tub, the wringer was rotated so that it was centered over the two tubs, rather than being centered over the edge of the washer tub. Just run them through and they'd drop into the bleach tub. If the items in the rinse tub didn't need bleaching, the washer lid was placed over the bleach tub. The lid caught the clothing before it could drop into the bleach tub. A laundry basket could serve the same purpose.

The washer was filled one time with water. White clothing that needed bleach was washed first. These were the least dirty linens. As soon as the items were in the rinse tub, another batch of clothing was put into the washer. These were still lighter colored clothing and things with little dirt. This was repeated over and over until the darkest clothing was washed. And the most dirty was held to last. On the farm these were jeans and overalls.

If, for some reason there were more dirty clothes than that batch of water could clean, the washer was emptied and refilled. That was rare because we tried to to the laundry before it accumlated to the point that the washer needed to be filled with water more than once.

As to washing in winter and freezing temps. With the wringer washer we had, the water was drained after each use. So there was nothing to freeze.

With your top loading washer, you're using too much detergent. I keep telling my Sister that here. Too much detergent doesn't help clean clothing any better, IMHO, and simply means the washer can't rinse all of it out with one rinse cycle. If I know that sometime needs more agiation in order to get clean, I leave the washer lid open, so the spin cycle can't begin. Then, reset the washer to start from the beginning again.

One other thing... With your lop loader, just fill it with rain water to the level it normally fills. Add your detergent and clothing. Then start the cycle, as you normally do. The washer will sense the amount of water in it and won't add anymore. You'll need to stop the washer when the spin cycle finishes, so it won't automatically fill with rinse water. That is if you want to use rain water for the rinse cycle.

For long term, IMHO, you don't want to use a top loader and manually fill it with water. That's two tubs of water per load of clothes. With a wringer washer it's only 2 tubs for the whole wash. One to wash and one to rinse. (3rd one if you want to bleach clothing.)

Hope this helps.
Lee

AlchemyAcres
06-06-2010, 09:54 PM
I've used rain water in automatic washers in the past.
Leave the machine hooked up to the house water (this is so water can be added to the proper and safe level).
Turn on the machine and let it start filling....add the rainwater until the pump shuts off (it'll stop pumping when the water reaches a certain level)...do the same for the rinse cycle.

That's all there is to it!!!

~Martin

keydl
06-07-2010, 06:49 AM
An alternative to a wringer was an EZ Spindrier - had the same agitator but instead of a wringer it had a vertical spin tub for extracting the water.

Same drill wash clean to dirty, might add soap for later loads to keep a little suds showing. Extract the soapy water and set aside until the tub was filled with rinse water. If the rise water showed suds it caused another rinse or if it turned dirty. Had a bell timer on it to remind you not to wash a load for hours.

It replaced a gas powered wringer washer and was used for uniforms from dads shop for another 25 years after the automatic washer and drier were bought.

daffodil
06-07-2010, 10:53 AM
Daf, I helped my Mom with the laundry, using a wringer washer, until I got married. At one time, it sat on a screened backporch. We moved and the washer went into a farm shed near the house.

It did run on electricity. If you get an electric one, find the plate that gives the amp draw. Size your extension cord so that you're pulling about 80% of the maximum load the cord will draw. You'll probably need one that's rated for 15 amps with 12 ga wire.

To use it, fill with water, not all the way to the top, as you have to add the clothing. Add your detergent. Engage the dasher and let it wash for as long as you think that load of clothing needs agiation (sp). Stop the dasher and start the ringer. Pull an item from the washer and start an edge of it through the ringer. Be careful and keep your fingers out of that wringer. With something like a sheet, try to find the edge of the long end. Start feeding that through leaving the bottom of the sheet in the washer. The wringer will gradually pull the sheet through.

From time to time with heavy or thick items you may need to assist. Start the item through the wringer. Then go around to the backside and GENTLY pull the item through. Our wringer had an emergency bar. Hit that and the wringer would stop and the rollers would spring apart on one end. Two purposes. One was to get your hand, hair, etc out if caught. The other was to get out something that wrapped itself around the wringer or jammed in it.

We set tubs behind the washer. The one directly behind it was for rinsing. As the wringer pulled the items through, they'd drop into the rinse tub. Along side the rinse tub, we sat a bleach tub. This was rinse water with a little Clorox in it. To get from the rinse tub to the Clorox tub, the wringer was rotated so that it was centered over the two tubs, rather than being centered over the edge of the washer tub. Just run them through and they'd drop into the bleach tub. If the items in the rinse tub didn't need bleaching, the washer lid was placed over the bleach tub. The lid caught the clothing before it could drop into the bleach tub. A laundry basket could serve the same purpose.

The washer was filled one time with water. White clothing that needed bleach was washed first. These were the least dirty linens. As soon as the items were in the rinse tub, another batch of clothing was put into the washer. These were still lighter colored clothing and things with little dirt. This was repeated over and over until the darkest clothing was washed. And the most dirty was held to last. On the farm these were jeans and overalls.

If, for some reason there were more dirty clothes than that batch of water could clean, the washer was emptied and refilled. That was rare because we tried to to the laundry before it accumlated to the point that the washer needed to be filled with water more than once.

As to washing in winter and freezing temps. With the wringer washer we had, the water was drained after each use. So there was nothing to freeze.

With your top loading washer, you're using too much detergent. I keep telling my Sister that here. Too much detergent doesn't help clean clothing any better, IMHO, and simply means the washer can't rinse all of it out with one rinse cycle. If I know that sometime needs more agiation in order to get clean, I leave the washer lid open, so the spin cycle can't begin. Then, reset the washer to start from the beginning again.

One other thing... With your lop loader, just fill it with rain water to the level it normally fills. Add your detergent and clothing. Then start the cycle, as you normally do. The washer will sense the amount of water in it and won't add anymore. You'll need to stop the washer when the spin cycle finishes, so it won't automatically fill with rinse water. That is if you want to use rain water for the rinse cycle.

For long term, IMHO, you don't want to use a top loader and manually fill it with water. That's two tubs of water per load of clothes. With a wringer washer it's only 2 tubs for the whole wash. One to wash and one to rinse. (3rd one if you want to bleach clothing.)

Hope this helps.
Lee

That helps:)! questions...In the rinse tub, do you just swish them around by hand to rinse? After using it to rinse once does it get the soap out of the rest of the loads all the way? Why do most people seem to use this machine outside? To empty the water from the washer and tubs easier? And how much room would I need for this set up?

NCLee
06-07-2010, 02:27 PM
Daf, it depends on how much soap/detergent is put into the washer. Most people use way, way too much. Just a little is all that's needed to make water "wetter". It's the action of the clothing moving through the water that removes the dirt.

If the amount of detergent is kept low, then the rinse tub can be used for several loads of clothing. For a small wash day, as is probably what would be in your case, because you don't have children, one tub of rinse water is all that would be needed. (That's if doing the washing once a week.)

Many people think they need to see lots of suds in the washer. That isn't needed, and is usually too much detergent/soap. As long as you can see a few soap bubbles on top, that's a plenty. When using a wringer washer with multiple loads, you may need to add a bit more, as the wash progresses.

Yes, it's much easier to deal with the water when using a washer on a back porch, for example. Don't have to worry about spills when filling the washer and tubs. Water can be dumped off the porch, water shrubs around the porch, and/or water grass & flowers.

Plus there's less walking! Especially if the washer is near the clothesline. And, near the water source (rain collection in your case.) You could put the a wringer washer in the shed you have in the back yard. And, shouldn't have any problems, as long as the floor is strong enough to accept the weight of the machine & tubs filled with water.

BTW, if you set up a bleach tub, it isn't necessary to dump that water when you finish washing. Cover it so nothing can get into it. Next week, use it again. Smell the water. If you can't smell bleach, add more until you get a FAINT scent of bleach. That's a plently. Dump that tub every other week. That'll help save a little water.

Lee

keydl
06-08-2010, 01:09 AM
How do you use them outside in the winter?


Before the pumpjack I got to carry water from the windmill, seemed like 50 gallons. 2 gallons at a time, heated on a propane stove, run in the washer and then for the rinse. When the temps were -10F some of the wash or rinse water was dumped to keep the water temps up. The water was dumped to a ditch that took the kitchen waste water and watered windscreen trees. When the temps were possible to go below freezing the drain hose was laid on the ground, the wash tub was stacked upside down on top of the wringer. There was a rush to get the cloths on the line before they froze and made it hard to hang them. Because of the wind it was common to dig 3 feet of snow out before getting to the machine and starting at 20 F and down required a precise method - no problem in the summer.

After the gravity tank and pumpjack there was a propane water heater and 2 taps in the kitchen.

keydl
06-08-2010, 01:50 AM
That helps:)! questions...In the rinse tub, do you just swish them around by hand to rinse? After using it to rinse once does it get the soap out of the rest of the loads all the way? Why do most people seem to use this machine outside? To empty the water from the washer and tubs easier? And how much room would I need for this set up?


We used a stick until the water cooled and a couple or 3 bushel baskets lined with oilcloth and set on benches. Out of the machine - into the rinse. Load the machine with the next load and stir the rinse. Shift the wringer and out of the rinse into the basket, swing the wringer back and restart the agitator. Check the rinse water for dirt and soap by agitating to look for soap bubbles. Sheets, towels, and shirts generally used up the first rinse tub. Depending on the season and the look of the wash water - one or the other was dumped. If it was the wash then the rinse went in the washer. During roundup the jeans and gear often needed 2 rinses - when you pull the stuff out of muddy water they are not clean.

Soap - the now outlawed phosphate detergent showed a little bubbles, if they went away just add a little and wash for 10-15 min. The new stuff is not the same, takes 2-3 washings before you smell the skin oil left with not enough detergent. To much detergent is really hard on the skin, it will eat into the protective oil on the skin and leave it exposed to fungus - bad news with A/C and high humidity. With low humidity the water evaporates and concentrates the salts to substitute for the oil and the fungal load is much less. I have not tried making laundry soap but use Zote for hand washing, the other 2 have smell problems, one smells like kerosene ( no problem ) the other like a rendering plant. Just grab the knife and make 4 bars out of 1 and there are no comments from the peanut gallery. Set it so the OZ faces you and tell them it is imported :)

johnny
06-08-2010, 01:25 PM
Daf--remember that rainwater is almost always 'softer' that tap or well water and as such--

if you use say half cup of detergent with tap then you can cut that in half easily when using rainwater and sometimes that will be to much.
Also--strain it thru and old sheet or something similar to get all the dirt settlings out of the water before using in either wash or rinse water. Mom always had a bucket that she used to get it from the barrel and would strain it when pouring into the bucket.
Number 2 washtubs can be easily had and probably ready made stands for them too especially if around Amish communitys. IF you choose to make your own stand for the rinse tub then be aware that at about 6 pounds per gallon--they will need to be fairly sturdy to hold the water weight and rinsing action.

For stirring in the rinse tub, take an old broom handle and cut it to about 3 foot long or so and use it as sort of an agitator when rinsing.

Also, if just dumping the water on the ground after using--
check your local laws or ordinances cause many do not permit it now days.