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beetle_docI
12-03-2010, 08:53 PM
I was hoping to do a little canning during the upcoming gardening season. Unfortunately, our house has a glass top stove. I have read that these are not ideal for canning, therefore, I was thinking of buying a used electric stove with exposed coils and put it in the Morton building for canning purposes. Are all electric ranges created equal when it comes to canning (pressure and water bath)?
Thanks

Rickhead
12-03-2010, 09:59 PM
If you look at the heating elements on an electric range, notice the coils. Some are close together, some are far apart. The close together ones are way better, and heat faster, imo.
If there is any way to install propane, i would do it. Power outages, the range is still usable. Food for thought. Lol

Travis
12-03-2010, 10:22 PM
If you look at the heating elements on an electric range, notice the coils. Some are close together, some are far apart. The close together ones are way better, and heat faster, imo.
If there is any way to install propane, i would do it. Power outages, the range is still usable. Food for thought. Lol


I like the propane idea. If you do not have propane at your home you could get a 25 gallon tank and go that route. Personally I like propane and grew up cooking on it.

Gemglo
12-03-2010, 10:45 PM
We have a glass top stove too. However, our instruction manual says canning is safe for our model. I haven't had any problems with it so far. I'd check the manual for sure.

Jennifer

NCLee
12-03-2010, 11:11 PM
FWIW, I've canned on both gas and electric. Some thoughts.....

Electric coils work fine for canning. Based on the stoves I've used for pressure canning (3 different ones), it's actually a little easier to control the pressure on an electric stove. Once you find the "sweet spot" on the dial for the particular stove you're using, you'll be all set. That spot on a propane stove is a bit harder to find. However, this isn't a material difference.

With either one there are two main things to consider. The size (surface area) of the stove and the BTU ratings of the burners. For best results you need a top that's larger than 30". When I had a 30" electric cooktop, I hated it because there wasn't enough room, especially when doing hot pack canning. The pressure canner took its place first. Then the pot to heat the jars. Another to heat the lids. Finally, the pot needed for heating the product to be canned. All except the pressure canner had to sit off center on the burners to get everything on the stove.

To solve that problem, I picked up a used gas stove and installed it in the kitchen. That gave me 8 burners, thus plenty of room for canning and cooking supper, too. However that revealed the second consideration. I don't know the BTU rating of the burners on that stove, but it took quite a bit longer to heat up the fully loaded canner. The electric stove was much faster.

When we remodeled our kitchen, I put in a 6 burner propane stove. First requirement in selecting that stove was that both the burners and the oven could be manually lit if the power is out. If it didn't do that, I didn't consider it. Period. Next was a range of BTU ratings for the burners. Had to have 1 high output and 1 simmer burner.

Today, that what I use for canning. It's large enough to run 2 pressure canners, if I have to clean out the freezer in a hurry due to a storm taking out the power lines.

Long round about way of recommending that if your space and budget permits put an electric cooktop in your place. And, add a propane range. Both can be picked up, used, fairly inexpensively. Having both of them will give you 8 burners. You can decide which one is best for your canners. Then use whatever combo of burners are needed for the rest of the canning operation. This can vary greatly, if you're going to do a wide variety of canning. And are planning to do both waterbath and pressure canning.

Put the range on a 100 lb propane cylinder or have your local propane company install a pig. Depending on how much canning and other cooking you'll be doing, a 100 lb is probably enough. It's what I use in my shop for seasoning cast iron cookware.

One more note. As Rickhead said, if there's only one option, go with propane. There's nothing like a hot buttered biscuit, pot of steaming coffee to go with bacon and eggs after a storm has taken out the power lines.

With all the things we talk about here, there's no way that I could recommend an electric stove either as the primary stove or as backup to another electric stove. Except as in the combo mentioned above to give you enough space and burners. Even in that case, the propane stove would come first.

Hope this helps. Do let us know what you get and how you're setting up your canning kitchen. I, for one, enjoy hearing how others set up their operations.

Lee

cuppajoe
12-03-2010, 11:12 PM
I was hoping to do a little canning during the upcoming gardening season. Unfortunately, our house has a glass top stove. I have read that these are not ideal for canning, therefore, I was thinking of buying a used electric stove with exposed coils and put it in the Morton building for canning purposes. Are all electric ranges created equal when it comes to canning (pressure and water bath)?
Thanks


When we canned we had an electric range. It took awhile to heat up but it did the job...used ones run $100-200 for a fairly decent used one

Muttley
12-08-2010, 01:42 PM
We have a gas and electric stove that I use for canning. The gas stove is in our kitchen and is used when the weather is cooler. Works great and haven't had any problems. We have a smaller apartment sized electric stove that was given to me that I put in our basement. I use this stove when it is warm out so that I don't heat up our main living area needlessly. It works fine as well, but it was a little more of an expriment to get the burners fine tuned. I haven't noticed a minutes difference between the two. Good luck with whatever you choose!

beetle_docI
12-17-2010, 01:43 PM
Thanks for the information.

Aamylf
12-17-2010, 03:07 PM
I have a glass topped stove and have canned on it quite successfully. You just have to buy the right canner. If I have to get a new stove, it won't be glass top, however, because you have to be so careful with them. I am not able to have propane or I would, too, have a second stove that was propane operated for all of the above reasons.

suzb
12-17-2010, 04:45 PM
There was an electric stove here when we first moved in, which was changed to natural gas a couple of years ago... I used to can on both, but I will firmly, loudly reinterate what NC Lee said about size...it is a real drag to try to fit everything you need on the top of a stove that is just "that much" too small.

I would put that consideration at the top of the list...well, right behind cost. When X DH went and bought me new appliances for a surprise Christmas present, and the stove was not bigger...it was a sweet idea, but, as I pointed out to him...I would never buy him tools unless he had showed me exactly what he wanted...and I use my stove a LOT more then he used his tools...:fie: New appliances just had not come up as a topic of conversation, so he had no idea I was pining for the old stove to die so I could get a new one that was big enough to put the pans ON the burners instead of doing a balancing act with boiling water.

oldtimer
01-25-2011, 10:48 PM
If you're in the market for a new stove, here's a reasonable stove and it's the canner's dream.

http://www.premierrange.com/gasranges36.htm

We had an old 1948 model forever, but it got to where I couldn't keep it going. Sears would laugh at me when I'd call for parts. It was a five burner stove. Burner in center for big canner, can be pulled out for a griddle. We went forever without getting a new one as we didn't want to lose our nice big old stove or that middle burner as how to heck to do use a canner on these dinky other stoves they have? It ties up so you can't use other burners.

Anyway, we finally got internet and I found the stove linked above. Wish we'd found it sooner, most folks don't know they make such a lovely stove still. And the even better part is it's all American made in America by Americans; It also can be lit with a match if the electicity is out, including the oven.

I called the company a couple weeks back and they said they might not make this stove much longer as they don't sell a lot.

I told them they don't sell a lot because no one has them in their showroom but if they did, they'd surely sell, it's fantastic, I can't praise it enough. They should call it "The Canner's Delight" or some such name. :):D