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View Full Version : Terribly dry, cracked, painful skin on hands


MollyPitcher
01-28-2011, 01:40 AM
My hands look horrible. They look like dried out gloves. I wash my hands often. I wear gloves when doing things like handling firewood, using rakes, shovels or other hand tools, and generally any time I need to do something dirty or physical with my hands. I wash dishes by hand but use dish liquid that is supposed to keep hands soft.

I am assuming it is simply the low humidity, combined with hand washing. My hands are extremely dry, and the skin across my knuckles is cracked and bleeds, and some of my fingertips have little splits in them as well as areas on my palms. I had some little tubes of dermabond and so I glued the little splits on my fingertips to get some relief from the pain. Hard to believe how much they hurt.

In the past couple of months I have tried Lubriderm, Cetaphil, vaseline, and a locally made goat milk lotion with 'healing essential oils'. I apply lotion every time I wash my hands, and I have greased up my hands at night and tried sleeping in gloves, and that hasn't even worked.

Any ideas anyone? Or is it something that I just have to keep doing until the problem passes?

CCinthewoods
01-28-2011, 02:15 AM
My hands look horrible. They look like dried out gloves. I wash my hands often. I wear gloves when doing things like handling firewood, using rakes, shovels or other hand tools, and generally any time I need to do something dirty or physical with my hands. I wash dishes by hand but use dish liquid that is supposed to keep hands soft.

I am assuming it is simply the low humidity, combined with hand washing. My hands are extremely dry, and the skin across my knuckles is cracked and bleeds, and some of my fingertips have little splits in them as well as areas on my palms. I had some little tubes of dermabond and so I glued the little splits on my fingertips to get some relief from the pain. Hard to believe how much they hurt.

In the past couple of months I have tried Lubriderm, Cetaphil, vaseline, and a locally made goat milk lotion with 'healing essential oils'. I apply lotion every time I wash my hands, and I have greased up my hands at night and tried sleeping in gloves, and that hasn't even worked.

Any ideas anyone? Or is it something that I just have to keep doing until the problem passes?

I'm sorry to hear of the pain you are going through. You might try
"Corn Huskers" lotion sold at Walmart or even "Bag Balm" also sold at Walmart and most feed stores. Do you wear dish gloves when washing the dishes? I hope you find a healing solution quickly, let us know if you do? CC

BonnyLake
01-28-2011, 05:38 AM
I go through this when my immune system isn't working correctly. It is normal to get small cuts on our hands throughout the day and they usually heal very quickly, sometimes in a matter of minutes they will close by themselves and you never would notice them. Even when your fingernails are growing they slightly split the skin on the edges - But when, for whatever reason, they aren't healing they compound in and around each other and that's when they seem to crack open. It's very painful and debilitating too because you can't use them without reacting...

So I have had to start using neosporin or a similar antibiotic type cream/gel like you would a hand lotion several times a day and that seems to give me enough relief to function even though it gets a little messy - and some of them have an analgesic added which helps with the contact pain. Try putting that on your hands at night with cotton gloves and see if that helps. Also - I've figured out that using anything with oil or vaseline in it just makes them worse, almost acts like an astringent and they get drier.

Hope something helps!

12vman
01-28-2011, 08:41 AM
Could it be a fungus? Try some vinegar. I know vinegar works for feet..

Maybe an OTC fungal cream?

Laura
01-28-2011, 09:08 AM
My hands look horrible. They look like dried out gloves. I wash my hands often. I wear gloves when doing things like handling firewood, using rakes, shovels or other hand tools, and generally any time I need to do something dirty or physical with my hands. I wash dishes by hand but use dish liquid that is supposed to keep hands soft.

I am assuming it is simply the low humidity, combined with hand washing. My hands are extremely dry, and the skin across my knuckles is cracked and bleeds, and some of my fingertips have little splits in them as well as areas on my palms. I had some little tubes of dermabond and so I glued the little splits on my fingertips to get some relief from the pain. Hard to believe how much they hurt.

In the past couple of months I have tried Lubriderm, Cetaphil, vaseline, and a locally made goat milk lotion with 'healing essential oils'. I apply lotion every time I wash my hands, and I have greased up my hands at night and tried sleeping in gloves, and that hasn't even worked.

Any ideas anyone? Or is it something that I just have to keep doing until the problem passes?

Water.
Drink more water. Your skin is dehydrated. The skin is the largest human organ......and it needs water.
The outside elements suck the hydration out of your skin, and if you are not RE hydrating from the inside, it will trash your hands (says the little girl who washes her hands 100 times a day).

HTH

momma_to_seven_chi
01-28-2011, 09:27 AM
You need some lanolin on them. It's the best thing for cracked, chapped hands. Find a lotion with lanolin rather than any glycerine. If you can't find Lanolin, then use some plain old lard or olive oil, smear it all over them, put on rubber gloves, and wear it overnight. I personally don't like the corn huskers because it burns my hands so much. Lanolin doesn't burn, and works with a couple of applications. I found a huge gallon jug of the stuff at a tractor supply store for half price-twenty dollars- last year. I love the stuff. You use to be able to buy lanolin in tubes, but it's harder to find now. I guess that is because sheeps wool isn't as popular any longer.
Use the essential oils on your feet. The meridians of your body connect to the ground there. That is where they are most useful.

rivahmom
01-28-2011, 10:54 AM
Could it be a fungus? Try some vinegar. I know vinegar works for feet..

Maybe an OTC fungal cream?

I agree with this. However, if it is fungus you may need to take fungicides. Olive leaf extract I believe is an herbal one. A lanolin or beeswax lotion with tea tree oil would help a great deal.

BigOBear
01-28-2011, 11:26 AM
Growing up, the grandparents, aunts and uncles used Cornhusker's lotion. My skin isn't as bad as what you describe but I keep some on hand for my elbows in the winter. Here are the ingredients (http://www.livestrong.com/article/108458-corn-huskers-lotion-ingredients/)if you want to read about it. Would like to know what you find that works.

backlash
01-28-2011, 12:50 PM
Zim's crack cream.
I use it when my hands get really dry and my finger crack open and bleed.
My wife uses it on her feet.

http://www.crackcreme.com/products/skincare/index.html
I buy mine at the drug store so it is available locally.
I like the way it smell but my wife isn't fond of the smell.
The again I like Hoppe's #9. :)

grumble
01-28-2011, 03:24 PM
MTSC said everything I could contribute, and then some.

My problem is the opposite, I try to keep my hands hard so they don't blister from work. I make my own bullet lube from lanolin and tallow, and every time I make a batch, it takes a month to get my hands hardened up again.

I have found that wearing regular cloth/leather work gloves will also soak up moisture from my hands and helps harden the skin. Maybe trying a different work glove will help?

Psoriasis is also a possibility. It's a skin virus. Some people use UV light to kill the virus, but I suppose anything that is antiviral would work?

mozarkian
01-28-2011, 03:56 PM
My hands look horrible. They look like dried out gloves. I wash my hands often. I wear gloves when doing things like handling firewood, using rakes, shovels or other hand tools, and generally any time I need to do something dirty or physical with my hands. I wash dishes by hand but use dish liquid that is supposed to keep hands soft.

I am assuming it is simply the low humidity, combined with hand washing. My hands are extremely dry, and the skin across my knuckles is cracked and bleeds, and some of my fingertips have little splits in them as well as areas on my palms. I had some little tubes of dermabond and so I glued the little splits on my fingertips to get some relief from the pain. Hard to believe how much they hurt.

In the past couple of months I have tried Lubriderm, Cetaphil, vaseline, and a locally made goat milk lotion with 'healing essential oils'. I apply lotion every time I wash my hands, and I have greased up my hands at night and tried sleeping in gloves, and that hasn't even worked.

Any ideas anyone? Or is it something that I just have to keep doing until the problem passes?

I love Corona oinment (feedstore- big yellow tub is $9 and change). I use it instead of bag balm on my girls after milking and just that much usage keeps my hands in good shape. It has a warming, kind of menthol quality to it that improves circulation in their udders and has prevented any weather issues all winter long.

Milking Mama
01-28-2011, 09:03 PM
Lanolin is great. You might try looking in the baby section of your local department store. Nursing moms use it a lot (Lansinoh and Medela are two brands). I use lanolin on my kids' hands and lips when they get chapped. (I try to use all-natural stuff on the kids.)

When their hands get REALLY bad, I use Renew. It's a lotion made by Melaleuca, and it contains tea tree (melaleuca) oil. Everyone I've given it to really loves it, and it works well on my son's eczema, too. But it's not all-natural, I think. :confused:

Here's a link: http://www.melaleuca.com/ProductStore/ProductSubCategory.aspx?id=62

TEX
01-28-2011, 09:49 PM
My Mother gets bad cracks on her fingers and puts superglue on the cracks to keep them from getting worse. Her Dr.said it was ok - and it helps but that said

Drink much more water and as others have said Bag Balm - Bag Balm is my friend. Also slather your hands with it and sleep in white cotton gloves.

Mom5farmboys
01-29-2011, 09:16 AM
You've gotten a lot of good advice so far, the only thing I can think to add is instead of greasing up your hands and sleeping with gloves on, still grease up your hands but sleep with cotton socks on your hands instead. I have found if I don't seperate my fingers with cloth they seem to heal up quicker.

gwhilikerz
01-29-2011, 08:39 PM
Drink more water, less caffeine. Soak your hands for about 20 mins in warm (not hot) water. Then put Aveeno Daily Moisturizer on your wet hands. Do this at least a couple of times a day and especially at bedtime. Give it about a week and your problem should be gone. It worked wonders for me.

MollyPitcher
01-30-2011, 02:40 AM
Thanks to everyone for the replies and suggestions. I really do apprecaite the help!

I'm allergic to lanolin, so I'm not able to use that. Even the smell nauseates me. I found out the hard way that I was allergic to it many years ago by buying bag balm. At least I think it was bag balm--comes in the small green, square metal can. Had the worst swollen rash from it.

No fungus, psoriasis, or etc. Just really dry skin, it's seasonal. Warm weather, I don't have this problem.

It's been a bit better today, but only because I haven't done anything today!!

My mother told me that when she was first married and they didn't have any money for things like lotions, she would soak her hands in warm water with oatmeal in it. I am going to give that a try before I go to bed shortly. She said it helped her, so maybe it will help me.

Never thought of using cotton socks--sure would be less messy than gloves, and easier to wash, too.

Thank you again to everyone for the ideas. I might try to pick up some Cornhusker's lotion next time I'm in town, need to read it to make sure it doesn't have lanonin in it though.

sally
01-30-2011, 02:45 AM
A magnesium deficiency can cause dry skin.
You might want to take some chelated magnesium (magnesium citrate, magnesium malate, etc) nightly for a few weeks. Magnesium oxide, however, has to be taken with caution, because too much will cause loose stools.

I used to have chronic chapped lips and I had to apply lipstick and chapstick constantly. Like once/hour. This went on for decades. But since I've been taking magnesium, I only apply lip protection a few times per day. Also my hands don't get as dry, though I still sometimes apply petroleum jelly at night to my fingertips. I never use lotions, because they dry my skin, for some strange reason.

momma_to_seven_chi
01-30-2011, 10:54 AM
I don't know about magnesium deficiency causing dry skin, but I can tell you that you can increase your magnesium levels by soaking your feet in epsom salts. It's used for autistic kids because they also suffer from Mg deficiency. You absorb it through the meridian channels in your feet.

You can also take it orally, but soaking your feet is more relaxing. LOL.

sally
01-30-2011, 11:45 PM
Neat, Momma7! Sounds like an excellent idea. And so much more enjoyable!

Nancymw
01-31-2011, 11:44 AM
Has anyone tried coconut oil? It will help with the dryness and I heard it even helps with antiviral, antifungal, and antibacterial problems. I haven't tried it except as a lotion on my skin for dryness - but I love it for that.

reb
01-31-2011, 12:09 PM
Molly,

Some years ago, my Dad got burned throwing a skillet full of grease out that was on fire. He was going in the pharmacy for the 'doctor recommended big pharma' tube of siver stuff...a 'spitter' sitting out front asked him about his hand, and told him about vitamin E capsules. The doc had told Dad he was going to lose most of the use of his hand; he used vitamin E (right out of the little capsules cut open), and got almost all the use back.

Whenever I have some skin cut that won't heal, I cut a capsule of vitamin E and spread some on the cut or whatever. I do the same thing with my dry hands that split on the end of the thumbs each winter. Before they get that bad, I use O'Keeffe's Working Hands creme on them. It has more stuff in it than the bed holding Bob&Carol&Ted&Alice. It don't list lanolin, but you should check for yourself.

Those hand cracks hurt. Hope you find a solution.

sissy
02-01-2011, 12:12 AM
I have had this twice (bad) that I can remember. My hands were dry cracked & itched a lot. Both times I was allergic to something. And nothing would sooth them. The first was dish soap. The Dr. said I had the 7 year itch, lol (I was young). Quit using the soap or were gloves, fixed it up. The second time was when I worked in a sewing plant. There was one stile that always broke my hands out. Had the hardest time convincing the management that this was the truth. As soon as i quit sewing that stile my hands started to heal. Both times they would not heal till I got away from the stuff that aggravated them.
Hope you find some relief very soon.
sissy

Dame
02-01-2011, 03:45 AM
I react to perfumed soaps and detergents and to latex gloves. Solution, make my own soap.

The epsom salts soak is soothing, and the vit e does work, although I find it works better if mixed into some cod liver oil. One of my kids had very sensitive skin and her pediatrician perscribed a vit a cream. very pricy and very effective. i find the cod liver oil (vit d & a), particularly with some vit e, less expensive and as effective.

cinok
02-01-2011, 09:06 AM
Corn huskers is your best freind. One thing to remeber is any lye based soap with increase the dryness chapping in winter.

Dreamin'
02-01-2011, 08:33 PM
Has anyone tried coconut oil? It will help with the dryness and I heard it even helps with antiviral, antifungal, and antibacterial problems. I haven't tried it except as a lotion on my skin for dryness - but I love it for that.

Nancy - I use coconut oil all the time. Like you I use it as a lotion. But I also use it as a conditioner for my hair. I have very long, think, naturally curly hair that requires a good conditioning treatment once or twice a week. It works wonders!

MollyPitcher
02-03-2011, 03:37 AM
Thanks again to everyone for their suggestions!

I've been soaking my hands in warm water with oatmeal in it, and it has helped. Makes my skin feel very soft and isn't greasy. I also have been diligent about keeping lotion on my hands, that cheap old Queen Helene cocoa butter lotion. Love the smell of it, and it's not greasy or oily. While my hands are still dry, they are not as dry as they were, and are starting to heal where they were split and cracked. I glued up the splits and the deeper cracks on my knuckles because they were continually pulling open again. Also wearing gloves as much as possible. I did try using socks on my hands at night, and am trying to get used to them. Keep scaring my dog, though. He doesn't know what to make of my hands with socks on them.

I haven't been anywhere to shop for several days, and so haven't looked for Corn huskers lotion, but I did add it to my shopping list for my next excursion out.

Oh, nearly forgot--I have some old vitamin E capsules, wonder if they are too old to do any good? They expired probably two years ago. Might try some of that, too.

At this point, I'll try nearly anything.

reb
02-03-2011, 09:46 AM
i don't think you have anything to lose by trying those old E capsules.

reading this again, i think i recall reading somewhere that Dolly Parton puts vaseline on her hands at night, and then puts a sock over each hand to keep it off the bed covers. she claimed that this keeps her hands soft. doesn't sound like it would be harmful, but i wouldn't wanna try to scratch my nose in bed. :)

CountryBertha
03-06-2011, 11:12 AM
Molly, it sounds like you should be wearing cotton liner gloves under the rubber gloves you wear. This sounds like an allergy and we do see it a lot in Nursing, Surgery, in the lab and any place where gloves have to be worn.

I would give my hands time to heal (don't wear the gloves for a while), and go easy on what I wash my hands with. I'd also use aloe on my hands while my skin is wet from washing them, and allow them to air dry. In extreme cases, I've had to use steroidal ointments on my hands.

mcole
03-15-2011, 04:52 PM
i've had pretty good luck with a product called "no-crack hand cream" i god from duluth trading co. at www.duluthtrading.com (http://www.duluthtrading.com) mcole

Drabbit
03-23-2011, 01:42 AM
:meeting: Hi Molly, from the outdoor nurse: you don't have a fungal infection. That Bag Balm idea was a good one, and I would get some New Skin, (liquid bandage). Stings at first but it is not only an antibiotic but also a protectorant for those cracks.
Stay away from the Vaseline and lanolin, they have an adverse affect, making the skin thinks it has too much moisture thereby creating more dry skin.
Also, try not using those dish washing/hand soaps, full of chemicals that are only irritating your skin. I would stick to something as pure as possible.
Lose, the gloves, only hold in heat which can lead to more cracking etc.
Aveno with no perfume is the best on the market right now if you want a lotion but you have to use it every time you wash your hands. Plus, make sure you are drying your hands and not using hot water.
Let me know if I can give anymore advice.

CountryBertha
03-23-2011, 05:18 AM
I just recently attended a medical seminar that addressed skin issues and came across something interesting that may be of benefit. They said applying Milk of Magnesia to broken skin and even "bed sores" was very healing and when it dries it creates a barrier on the skin.

I think caution should be the by-word, however, because Magnesia is something that can trigger allergies in some folks. But they were saying that people who can tolerate the Magnesia can also use it as underarm deodorant.

We've also noticed here at home that our purchased soaps are very harsh now. Brands that we've always used are burning or stinging skin. (Looks like I'll have to start making soap again.)

Paw was developing pressure points on the back of both his heels. They were in very early development and I did apply the Milk of Magnesia and it didn't work. The pressure points were not open and seeping, or open and dry -- they were very early red spots, so it could be the Magnesia would work better if the wound is open. We've returned to the thick aloe and air drying for all his skin care.

There was a bit of an odd thing that happened, however, when I had to do some emergency care of a fellow who had developed a horrific case of athlete's foot and massive seed warts on his feet. This guy had been caught in the mess left by a hurricane. His condition was so painful he couldn't walk and the condition was particularly aggressive. His hands were also broken out. We had little to nothing to help those people, but I did find some bottles of liquid ringworm meds for cats that had the ingredients he needed, and it worked like magic. It was simply poured over his hands and feet and air dried. Five bottles later he was completely healed and did not require surgical intervention. Later I found out that med is recognized as a quick cure for people too and will soon be marketed as a prescription item. We were never able to get a diagnosis on his hand condition, but thankfully that did heal. A friend of mine participated in field collection and research of "Black Walnut" for military use of skin ailments and she said it also works. I have not used Black Walnut.

One of the other ICU Nurses said her Mom, who is disabled from a stroke, requires a constant adjustment on her skin care due to immune responses. She will do fine for three or four months, then suddenly she will develop a problem and they have to change the product and treatment again.

Sometimes we can get a good diagnosis and other times we have to fly by the seat of our pants. I'd really like you to see a doc about your hands, Molly. He can take a look under the microscope and send off some swabs to find out -- hopefully -- what is irritating your hands and get it taken care of.

Best of luck to you.

BWHLover
03-23-2011, 10:59 AM
:meeting: Hi Molly, from the outdoor nurse: you don't have a fungal infection. That Bag Balm idea was a good one, and I would get some New Skin, (liquid bandage). Stings at first but it is not only an antibiotic but also a protectorant for those cracks.
Stay away from the Vaseline and lanolin, they have an adverse affect, making the skin thinks it has too much moisture thereby creating more dry skin.
Also, try not using those dish washing/hand soaps, full of chemicals that are only irritating your skin. I would stick to something as pure as possible.
Lose, the gloves, only hold in heat which can lead to more cracking etc.
Aveno with no perfume is the best on the market right now if you want a lotion but you have to use it every time you wash your hands. Plus, make sure you are drying your hands and not using hot water.
Let me know if I can give anymore advice.


Drabbit,

BagBalm is mostly Lanolin.

keydl
03-31-2011, 08:40 AM
Any of the edible oils will help and the gloves/socks will help keep the mess down.

The year that I worked with automatic transmisions/hydraulic systems was the only year that I had no dry tabs/cracks at the corner of the nails in heating season. Trans/hyd oil is also an excellent hand cleaner, with dirty greasy hands rub some on about 15 min before washup time, it washes off easier than diesel.

A drop of oregano oil or lavender in a small quantity if edible will make it smell nice and may encourage the healing -YMMV- start light with the essential oil.

West_TX_Desert_Rat
03-31-2011, 12:26 PM
I had this problem years ago. I didn't work outside so it wasn't work related. The skin on my hands would crack along my fingerprint lines, very deep and painful. Then when it would start getting colder outside, my nails would turn blue/black. It went away when I warmed my hands up.

I used to use bagbalm and gloves when I slept and it did help. Several years later I was diagnosed with RA. The meds I take totally have the RA in check and I no longer have the skin condition. I don't know if it is related or not, it's just how it happened for me.

MollyPitcher
04-01-2011, 02:30 AM
Thanks again everyone for the thoughts and suggestions! I saw my thread had come up again and read through the most recent replies.

My hands are back to normal now that winter is gone and the house isn't so dry from heating it. Well, normal as they ever will get, what with gardening and weed pulling and digging in the dirt.

I kept glueing the splits closed and finally they healed, and kept using non-greasy lotions and sleeping as often as I could stand it with my hands covered. I still wash my hands a lot, but I think the main cause was from the house being so dry because of using the wood stove, and when I was always washing my hands, and subjecting them to the cold, and the insides of various gloves (rubber, leather, deer hide) they just got too dry.

Hope everyone is enjoying the spring weather, or if it's not spring yet for you, that it soon is.

annabella1
04-03-2011, 06:26 PM
If the problem is the low humidity, you might get a humidifier or put a kettle on the wood stove or make a poor mans humidifier by placing a bucket of water with a rolled up newspaper wicking the water up through the top in an unobtrusive place and making sure it keeps full. Your symptoms are consistent with fungal or allergic reactions. If the oatmeal soak worked a cornmeal soak will work even better (as long as you are not allergic to corn). You may be allergic to the powder they put inside latex or plastic gloves so they are not so sticky, or to the latex itself. That can become a life threatening reaction so be careful.

BWHLover
04-04-2011, 07:39 PM
Thanks again everyone for the thoughts and suggestions! I saw my thread had come up again and read through the most recent replies.

My hands are back to normal now that winter is gone and the house isn't so dry from heating it. Well, normal as they ever will get, what with gardening and weed pulling and digging in the dirt.

I kept glueing the splits closed and finally they healed, and kept using non-greasy lotions and sleeping as often as I could stand it with my hands covered. I still wash my hands a lot, but I think the main cause was from the house being so dry because of using the wood stove, and when I was always washing my hands, and subjecting them to the cold, and the insides of various gloves (rubber, leather, deer hide) they just got too dry.

Hope everyone is enjoying the spring weather, or if it's not spring yet for you, that it soon is.

MollyPitcher,

I heat with a wood stove and place a cast iron kettle filled with water to add moisture to the air, it helps with my dry skin.

Pitdog
06-21-2011, 11:03 AM
Somthing else to consider is seasonally triggered eczema. Eczema is similar to but not the same as Psoriasis which I saw someone else mention (NEITHER of which are infections or fungus) I have all of your symptoms, most of them all the time depending on my work habits and WEATHER. Winter is bad, but something else to consider besides ALL of the other suggestions to see if it may be a type of eczema. At one time I was diagnosed with plantar palma psoriasis and it was from a Hokey Dermatologist. Turned out it was an eczema and was triggered to full force by the stress of my life at the time. Now it is seasonal for the most part. Try Vitamin D, it is super essential for everything including immune health and in the winter people that are even borderline defficient suffer more because you get less sun. First good dose of lawn mowing, gardening and haymaking and within 7 days my hands/feet are 90% clear.
Moisturizing is important, but all derms worth their salt will tell you only two moisturizers really cut the mustard when your hands are on the line Eucerin (generics are ok too) and Aquaphor. I use generic Eucerin and I used to go through a tub a month. Now I can go through a tub a year if that gives you an idea how bad off I was at one time.

warriorwolf47
07-17-2011, 06:52 PM
I give another vote for the vitamin E , I'm a delivery driver and during the winter months my hands get very dry (don't like gloves no matter how cold it gets) the E always takes care of it !

mdwilliams78
11-26-2013, 12:17 AM
I have to second the post on melaleuca Renew (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xU5iYSGoaE). The lotion works really well on my dry and cracked feet as well as my hands. Also some anti bacterial soaps will dry out your skin so if you use them, consider using a different one.

wildturnip
11-26-2013, 08:45 AM
I have this same problem with my hands. My thumbs and fingers develop cracks at the corners near the nail most often but sometimes in other places. It usually starts in November and continues through the winter. Sometimes my knuckles will crack. Mom's heels crack but so far, I've not had that happen.

I keep Corn Huskers lotion on them as much as possible.I use the contents of a Vitamin E capsule to heal the cracks. Nothing really prevents it that I've found. It happens every winter just like clockwork. I'm interested in the Vitamin D comment. I am deficient in D. So is DH, his is even lower than mine but he never has the cracks in his fingers.

doc
11-27-2013, 08:34 PM
All the remedies noted above have one thing in common: they are all oily to keep the skin moist and supple. (It's not the Vit E; it's the oil it's dissolved in that works). I use Vaseline covered with a Band-Aid for those pesky finger cracks in the winter.

Txanne
11-29-2013, 01:06 PM
I love coconut oil for my skin.
Its totally natural and smells nice.

wildturnip
11-29-2013, 02:34 PM
I love the smell of coconut! DH is allergic to it and even the smell bothers him because it reminds him of the awful nausea coconut causes.

Txanne
11-29-2013, 07:48 PM
I love the smell of coconut! DH is allergic to it and even the smell bothers him because it reminds him of the awful nausea coconut causes.

Strange but i am allergic too processed shredded coconut----but the oil hasnt bothered me.

MissouriFree
11-29-2013, 09:11 PM
I get the cracks to . Don't know about. Prevention but the quickest cure after the crack is there is good old fashion mentholatum in the green jar. Heals em almost overnight.

jeanb
11-30-2013, 04:34 PM
Molly
Use a mild hand soap when washing your hands and don't dry your hands after washing them until you apply a lotion to your hands while they are still wet, after a minute the lotion will lock the moisture in, dry your hands and apply a bit more lotion on your hands and you should see a difference in a couple days. Walmart carries aloe base soap and lotion which is good for the hands.
Thanks

wildturnip
11-30-2013, 08:47 PM
Strange but i am allergic too processed shredded coconut----but the oil hasnt bothered me.

You know, now that you mentioned it, he CAN eat fresh coconut not just the dried stuff! I wonder what it is about the processing that causes the reaction? What is your reaction? He gets extremely nauseated and filberts/hazelnuts give him the same reaction.

bookwormom
12-01-2013, 02:06 PM
My brother, who works with rebar, for bridges, big buildings and the like, swears by my homemade soap. I make it with beef tallow.
I use coconut oil on myself.

Txanne
12-01-2013, 06:10 PM
You know, now that you mentioned it, he CAN eat fresh coconut not just the dried stuff! I wonder what it is about the processing that causes the reaction? What is your reaction? He gets extremely nauseated and filberts/hazelnuts give him the same reaction.

Nauseated and back door trots.
And a mild rash---but I sure love the stuff!!

Could be the processing----

I have also crushed up my dried Rosemary and combined it---love the aroma and it clears the mind also.

The beauty of coconut oil is you can use it solid or liquid---its one of those natural things that is so benefical.

tgp7799
12-01-2013, 06:55 PM
i've had pretty good luck with a product called "no-crack hand cream" i god from duluth trading co. at www.duluthtrading.com (http://www.duluthtrading.com) mcole

I second the "No-Crack hand cream" I work outdoors and my hands will crack and bleed. No-Crack solved the problem.

wildturnip
12-01-2013, 07:26 PM
Nauseated and back door trots.
And a mild rash---but I sure love the stuff!!

Could be the processing----

I have also crushed up my dried Rosemary and combined it---love the aroma and it clears the mind also.

The beauty of coconut oil is you can use it solid or liquid---its one of those natural things that is so benefical.

That is interesting! I think I'll do some research on the processing of coconut and see what I find out. He only has the nausea.

Txanne
12-01-2013, 09:58 PM
That is interesting! I think I'll do some research on the processing of coconut and see what I find out. He only has the nausea.

On one of those informative shows--they showed how a family,cleaned packed raw coconut
they sold.

It must be in our process of making it last a longtime---additives?

Icu4dzs
12-03-2013, 11:51 PM
So far, I've seen a large variety of suggestions. Bag balm works pretty good for some folks.
From my perspective, the best on the market currently is Aquaphor Ointment. It is OTC and works exceptionally well.
:D
By the way, coconut milk is a well known cathartic, just in case anyone wants to know.

OzarksLady
12-09-2013, 02:18 PM
I'd go with the pure lanolin first then the bag balm. Slather your hands up good when you get ready for bed and put on a pair of white cotton gloves. You can buy socks and gloves for this at Sally's Beauty Supply or on line on Amazon if you can't find them in Walmart or some such place.

If you can't find the lanolin in your store ask the pharmacist if they have any. Sometimes, if you have a compounding pharmacy, they will have it behind the counter.

Actually on second thought if you have any coconut oil try that. I made up a pot with lavender essential oil and man do I like it! Makes my hand soft for two or three days. It only takes about a half of a teaspoon for both hands.

From my Reference Guide for Essential Oils:
For chapped/cracked skin: Myrrh, elemi, davana, onycha and patchouli.

For dry skin: Rosewood, geranium, lavender, roman chamomile, davana, jasmine, lemon, neroli, patchouli and sandlewood.

You can put any of these in coconut oil or a good quality non-scented lotion. It only takes a few drops per ounce of carrier oil/lotion.

Soilman
12-11-2013, 02:54 PM
I have exema and very dry skin in the winter. My knuckles and fingers also often split and are sore. My solution? I "suture" the splits together with super glue and use vasoline intensive care lotion for the dry skin. The glue work fairly well. It keeps the split fingers from being quite so sore, and enables the splits to heal much sooner. You have to re-apply several times, however, expecially if you use your hands a lot.

wildturnip
12-11-2013, 03:35 PM
I can't find info on additives to processed coconut. DH does have the same reaction to sulfites in other dried fruits. It's just strange!

OzarksLady
12-11-2013, 05:24 PM
I can't find info on additives to processed coconut. DH does have the same reaction to sulfites in other dried fruits. It's just strange!


Buy an organic coconut oil.

dinwitty
02-09-2014, 06:30 PM
having read this thread doing a web search, yep, my knuckles are cracking/bleeding, I'm not sure drinking plenty of liquids is doing that for me, I tend to be a near constant liquifier when I am not working, but my workplace is coolish during the winter and I multi-shirt wear. I've been using liquid bandage for now to clamp up the bleeding and protect the cracking area. I don't like to wear gloves, and I am fairly active, putting oils on will only splosh onto things I touch. The liquid bandaid to me tends to seal and protect yet keep the skin pliable.
But maybe I need to take some soaking baths, and yep, I think some soaps are kinda bad especcially for winter, perhaps I should look for moisturing soaps.

Some good ideas in this thread tho and some don't try this's.

Txanne
02-10-2014, 11:40 AM
Buy an organic coconut oil.

Wm is now carrying the organic coconut oil.
Not a bad price either.

As I age I find its a constant condition---dry skin or bumping bruises.
My I love coconut oil for my skin/cooking/animals .

OzarksLady
02-10-2014, 03:59 PM
I was a bartender for many years and when my knuckles would start to crack and bleed I'd use Carmex, the stuff for chaped lips, on them while at work. Just a thin coating and wipe if of on the palm of my hands. Other wise I would drop glasses because my hands were to slick. When I got home I'd use pure lanolin and put on cotton gloves while I slept.

LostintheOzone
02-12-2014, 10:17 PM
I used to work as a surveyor in the winter in near freezing weather and rain. My hands cracked and bled all the time. I tried everything that a normal drug store would carry and nothing worked. I found this at a natural foods store and it works. Really expensive but worth every penny. Takes the pain away and heals.

http://stores.graceharborfarms.com/msm-cream/