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pcrowder
01-10-2008, 03:33 PM
I see alot of canning recipes (for meat soups) that have rice in them, and you simply can the jars for the time that is required for the meat. I would like to know if it is possible to pressure can rice in water in the jars? If so, how long would you can it for? It would be so handy to grab a pint of pre-cooked rice, throw some dry boullion into the water from the jar, and some leftover meat/veggies in the pan, heat it up, and dinner for one! Also, I have a cabbage roll recipe that uses cooked rice, and to me it is such a waste of time/propane to have to wait for the rice to cook, and THEN start assembling everything, so it can bake for 45 mins. Has anyone done just rice & water? Also, would you have to cook the rice BEFORE canning it, or could you just measure out rice, add boiling water leaving appropriate head space, put the lids on and press can it that way? I think that the whole grain rice doesn't "poof up" as much as the minute-type rices do.
Thanks so much for any help you can give!
Pat

leera
01-10-2008, 04:29 PM
I've never thought about it. ???

I just steam my rice....set the timer for an hour and let it do it's thing.....

Seems like it would get mushy if canned after cooking,same as pasta does.

Shamrock1121
01-10-2008, 07:15 PM
I see alot of canning recipes (for meat soups) that have rice in them, and you simply can the jars for the time that is required for the meat. *I would like to know if it is possible to pressure can rice in water in the jars? If so, how long would you can it for? It would be so handy to grab a pint of pre-cooked rice, throw some dry boullion into the water from the jar, and some leftover meat/veggies in the pan, heat it up, and dinner for one! *Also, I have a cabbage roll recipe that uses cooked rice, and to me it is such a waste of time/propane to have to wait for the rice to cook, and THEN start assembling everything, so it can bake for 45 mins. Has anyone done just rice & water? *Also, would you have to cook the rice BEFORE canning it, or could you just measure out rice, add boiling water leaving appropriate head space, put the lids on and press can it that way? *I think that the whole grain rice doesn't "poof up" as much as the minute-type rices do.
Thanks so much for any help you can give!
Pat

I'd suggest you get with your County Extension Foods Agent for up-to-date canning information. You have some very dangerous notions when it comes to home canning.

As a quick reference guide, if you can't find any information covering the subject in the Ball Blue Book or at the National Center for Home Food Preservation http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publications/publications_usda.html, then it's probably not safe to can it.

Cooked rice keeps very nicely in the freezer.

Have you ever considered cooking things like rice, lentils, wheat, and beans in a Thermos? I often use a Thermos or my solar oven for the task.

I also use an electric kettle for heating water. It's much quicker and uses less energy than a kettle on a stove.

Source: http://www.livingaboard.com/magazine/sample/whatworks.pdf

Cooking With a Thermos

Here’s a recipe for cooking in a thermos.
Doug Cooley’s mom (a non-sailor) suggested
he use this method aboard his Westsail
32. He says it’s great for open sea,
when the galley may not be the most comfortable
place to hang out and prepare a
meal.

Choose a glass-lined pint thermos
with a narrow mouth (garage sales and
thrift or second-hand stores are good
places to look).

Fill the thermos with boiling water,
then pour out.
Place 1/4 cup of organically grown
whole brown rice, oat groats, hulled
barley, wheat berries, or lentils (either
individually or in combination, e.g.,
lentils and rice) in the thermos.
Refill with boiling water.
Screw on cap (helps keep ingredients
hot enough to cook).
Lay the thermos on its side. If you
leave it standing up, only the bottom
will cook. An old-fashioned lunch pail
will hold two pint thermoses in the flat
position for cooking and carrying.
By starting at night, you are assured
of a hot breakfast the next morning (or
next watch). It does not take eight
hours to cook but will be kept ready to
eat the next morning or even later. This
simple recipe makes a good take-along
lunch or supper and will cook in about
three hours. If you fix it in the morning,
you can have it for lunch, or you could
fix it at noon and have nutritious food
for supper.

If you add salt, do so only after the
food has cooked (food salted first will
not cook properly). Also, don’t use
more than 1/4 cup of grain, or you’ll find
it hard to get out. You can also enjoy
this simple dish with fruit, etc. After
you have enjoyed your meal, wash the
thermos bottle immediately, as it will be
harder to wash after it dries.

-Karen

anna
01-11-2008, 01:27 AM
Even if it were safe to do so I don't think the end product would be very attractive. Most likely it would cook to total mush.

pcrowder
01-11-2008, 02:52 PM
Dangerous notions? I'm sorry now I even asked the question. I've been canning for 20 years, and have never made a single person sick. The Ball Blue Book is my Bible for canning, as are Carla's Emery's books but I simply thought since it was safe to can rice in soups, for example, that it might be safe by itself. I hadn't thought about the "mushy" part, as Anna and Leera had suggested. After having lost an ENTIRE BEEF to a faulty electrical outlet, I am trying to not freeze anything I don't absolutely have to. Also, we are very rural - we can lose power out here for 2 months at a time, and I am not going to waste propane for the generator on a freezer full of things that could otherwise be canned.
I'm sorry if you think I have "dangerous" notions...guess I won't post on here again. I honestly didn't think asking a simple question would set myself up for such harsh assumption. I was always told that there is no such thing as a dumb question, except for the ones that aren't asked. Guess I was wrong.

Deberosa
01-11-2008, 02:58 PM
Dangerous notions? I'm sorry now I even asked the question. I've been canning for 20 years, and have never made a single person sick. The Ball Blue Book is my Bible for canning, as are Carla's Emery's books but I simply thought since it was safe to can rice in soups, for example, that it might be safe by itself. I hadn't thought about the "mushy" part, as Anna and Leera had suggested. After having lost an ENTIRE BEEF to a faulty electrical outlet, I am trying to not freeze anything I don't absolutely have to. Also, we are very rural - we can lose power out here for 2 months at a time, and I am not going to waste propane for the generator on a freezer full of things that could otherwise be canned.
I'm sorry if you think I have "dangerous" notions...guess I won't post on here again. I honestly didn't think asking a simple question would set myself up for such harsh assumption. I was always told that there is no such thing as a dumb question, except for the ones that aren't asked. Guess I was wrong.

I sure hope you don't let one remark keep you from posting because I am learning alot from what you do. I think the regs are far overblown anyhow - good to follow them of course but I've never made anyone sick from canned goods either. We need to know what works in real life. I think all of us are in for more grid outages as time goes by.

leera
01-12-2008, 03:06 AM
I was always told that there is no such thing as a dumb question, except for the ones that aren't asked. Guess I was wrong.

NO you are not wrong...... ;D

I am very much enjoying reading your posts,please don't let one or two remarks stop you.

I'm sure if you do some research you'll find a recipe for the rice.

annabella1
01-15-2008, 03:30 AM
I like to cook my rice in big batches till it's done, and then dehydrate it. you then only have to mix it with equal portions of boiling water or broth let it sit 5 minutes and it's ready. you can store the precooked dehydrated rice in canning jars if you want. To dehydrate it I just spread the precooked rice in a layer on my dehydrator trays and let them go. Stir them every few hours. I use brown rice and I am sure that this is more flavorful than store bought instant rice. You can also add some dried onion and garlic or other seasoning to make an instant whatever!

Penny_Plinker
01-15-2008, 09:24 AM
It would be interesting to try to can the rice in a widemouth jar with some beans, and onions mixed in. If it turned into a solid mass that would hold together, you could turn it out, slice it and fry it into cakes.

Inotherwords, i'm betting you could can it but not in the consistency you want. My beans are always sort of mushy in the jar and i use them anyway.

Penny

anna
01-17-2008, 01:27 AM
Rice and beans of that consistency would I think not be safe to can due to the density and not heating thoroughly all the way through. Definitely one to check with the Extension Service before trying.

Penny_Plinker
01-17-2008, 12:50 PM
I followed pressure cooking times for the beans, 90 min for quarts and 75 min for pints. The beans aren't as loose as canned beans from the store, but i followed directions so they're fine. As far as the county extension agent, i wasn't a bit impressed with her. There's nothing that makes me think she knows more than my mother in law knows about canning. MIL and i took our canners out there and the extension agent finally found the fancy testing device but she couldn't figure out how to use it. Me and MIL helped and between the three of us reading the directions the canners seemed to test out accurate. But we went ahead and got accessory weights for our canners just in case.

Penny

Danielle
01-17-2008, 05:00 PM
Annabella.....what a wonderful idea. Homemade minute rice. Thanks for sharing.

pcrowder
01-19-2008, 12:32 AM
Annabella:

thank you! I hadn't thought about minute-type rice either! I just hate to repeatedly waste propane cooking family-sized batch after batch of rice....This will be GREAT! Thanks again!
Pat

Deberosa
01-19-2008, 12:44 AM
I got this link from another list I am on. It's a great link but on it are recipes to make plastic bags of those rice a roni type rice mixes. Might be another way to store rice? Has lots of other cool stuff on it too.

http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/

hillbillygal
01-23-2008, 02:01 PM
Just wanted to let you know Jackie Clay's latest blog talks has a rice question at the end of it. Might be helpful too.

Penny_Plinker
01-24-2008, 03:23 PM
Who cares about rice????? I'm glad our Jackie has a love interest! ;)

Penny