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  #21  
Old 01-07-2011, 12:26 AM
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Originally Posted by rAcErRicK View Post
PS I did one time encounter a scope creeping forward in the rings. (TC Contender in 375 Win.) Tried the plastic tape, and it got goey and slid anyway. Masking tape, with black magic marker ink, did work though. No goo. Prolly from gun oil as well as heat.
Rosin. Powder the rings lightly with it then torque the rings properly. shouldn't be any creep unless the rings or the scope out out of their diameter specs.
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  #22  
Old 01-07-2011, 01:16 AM
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I have one of those mounts that replaces the rear sight blade, but it moves with every shot. If I tighten it up, the rail bends. If somebody tries to sell you one saying it will let you use a scope without gunsmithing, pass. It will place a scope on your rifle that is wobbly and worse than useless.
It a cheap rifle, made by poorly motivated communists, at war with questionable metal and machining. Adding anything too it is, well gilding the lily.

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How to:
0. get tools: work bench, rifle, punch, hammer, CLP, scrap wood.
Work bench, best is a heavy one you not afraid to mar, bolted down so it doesn't move when you are trying to work. Punches, I think I have at a minimum, 50+ some are iron, some steel, some brass, some nylon. The many different kinds also are in different diameters. Match the diameter of the punch to the pin your driving. You don't want to deform the pin, just make it move. Hammer 6-8 ounce ball peen for the pins, a 1 lb for driving parts (with something soft between the parts and the hammer) you want the mass to make the parts to move, dead blow hammers are preferred by some. CLP stands for Cleaner, Lubricant, and Protect-ant. That's one brand for firearms maintenance. Kroil now, orange square can, is a light machining and penetrating oil. Kroil is amazing for penetrating stuck parts and gets down into rusted screw threads and stuck pins. Scrap wood is ok, but take some time to make a set of leather faced, soft jaws that are custom fit to your vice. You want a machinist vice BTW. Some are of the opinion that a gunsmiths vice should have the jaws milled to be perfectly parallel and level. I think it is overkill. For you to decide. The top of the vice should come to your elbow when you arm is bent 90 degrees. This helps in precise work and helps you keep tools level (especially hand filing); use stacked 1/2 inch pieces of plywood and long bolts to raise your vice to a comfortable height above the workbench.

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1. remove ammo and bolt. fun first! safety second! Getting shot is no fun. It is also unsafe.
Well said.

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Originally Posted by macgeoghagen View Post
2. spray a little CLP on the rear sight assembly so it gets in all the cracks between the rear sight base and the barrel. Wait about 10 minutes.
Degrease, and have a good look. make sure it isn't all rusted up, gunked up, or any debris under the sight. use kroil far, far better at penetrating. 30 minutes, an hour, all night. Patience, the pin will come out, it went in after all. Steel punch of the same diameter as the pin, as close as you can. You may want a starter punch and a regular punch. A starter punch does what it is aptly named for, starts the pin moving. The starter is short and often made from punches that have broken off. A little short shank that stays on target and doesn't wobble. After the starter punch gets it moving, the regular punches drive it all the way through.

Drive pins in from the left and out from the right. a common but, not universal rule. A punch of smaller diameter than the pin can cause a dimple in the center of the pin, increasing the diameter of the pin, thus really sticking it in place. A oversized punch is of course larger than the pin and stops against the part with the pin in it. thus our smith is wailing away on the part and not the pin.

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Originally Posted by macgeoghagen View Post
3. Drive out the rear sight blade retaining pin. You can use the wood scrap to lay the rifle on if you don't have a gunsmiths vise to hold the rifle in. remove the sight blade and its spring.
pad the rifle with leather, heavy cloth, something. The stock can get dented or scraped and you don't want to damage the finish. This case, its a nugget, the finish is bad, use 2x4s. LOL. Best to remove the metal from the stock. You get a better grip on the parts and the metal finish is harder to muck up.

Masking tape especially the blue painters kind. The rear sight has a V shaped leaf spring under it. Cover lightly and lightly tape over the rear sight. This prevents parts from being spring propelled across the kitchen. Ask me how I know.

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Originally Posted by macgeoghagen View Post
4. Drive out the two pins holding the sight base on. They come out easier one way than the other. They may be silver soldered in place, necessitating the use of CLP to eat away at the solder.
Strike sharp hard blows, you don't want to make a rivet. The 1 lb hammer has enough mass to move the pin without have to swing wild hard blows. If kroil and time haven't made them loose. Heat. Hold the tip of a soldering gun to the tip of the pin. this gently warms the parts and causes expansion. Patience keep the soldering iron on for several minutes. In from the left and out from the right. As mentioned. The fellow that built that nugget may have been in a hurry as the Nazis were laying siege to Moscow. the parts may be soldered on. MAP gas. this is an in expensive gas torch for plumbing jobs. A self contained unit that can be purchased at you big box hardware outlet. Keep it moving around the part. you want to heat the part in whole. The solder may be very slight may ooze out. solder can draw toward heat. Wipe it of with a rag gently and make sure you not smearing it across the parts. You want it out and off.
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  #23  
Old 01-07-2011, 01:17 AM
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5. using the punch or a dowel rod, drive the rear sight base mount forward and off its dovetail. The dovetail is 3/8 inch wide.
Use a wooden dowel preferably a hard wood, or a nylon punch. You want it soft enough not to damage the part but, tough enough to transmit the force of the blow.

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6. Guess what else is 3/8 inch wide? scope mounts. In my case, an adapter mount to fit weaver to 3/8 inch. My scope came with a built in weaver base, requiring the use of an adapter. Install scope or rail, install scope. Go have fun, and be safe.
Shims. Fastenal sells shims that are .001 and .005. gets a tight fit and you can raise the scope for or aft to make it level, thus getting all the elevation and wind-age out of your scope to compensate for bullet impact and not scope installation.

A nugget is a fun tinker gun because the money out laid for it is small. The trigger job will help the heavy, gritty like concrete, long trigger pull.
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  #24  
Old 04-08-2011, 11:01 AM
keydl keydl is offline
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When you look at the trigger design there ia no way to use the original with out gross creep but polish the parts and grease them and it is not to bad. Trigger cams the sear down to release the firing pin. Lead edge of the firing pin and the rear surface of the sear/trigger spring as well as the trigger cam area and the surface it bears on of the spring. Drops the pull from over 10# to 5 1/2 - 6# with no gritty feel. A little metal off the firing pin will speed lock time, anyplace on the assy except the tip shape that bottoms in the bolt. Most seem to get down to about 1 1/2 in at 100 yd from a rest, saw one that beat an inch with 10 rounds and a scope with handloads.

Locking the rings down with pins in the holes on the rear sight mount is a good plan, a little lictite on the ring to scope surface helps to, same on the dovetail.
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