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  #41  
Old 06-11-2011, 08:17 PM
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karlamaria Female karlamaria is offline
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Does one have to use lye? Not sure I wNt it in my soap. I buy loaf soaps so I can cut to my desire size. I hate small bars of soap. We love the 14 oz bars or bigger lol.
I love the milk soaps, and love the real good smelling ones like chocolate Carmel or orange grapefruit. Makes me feel like a queen Bathing with it. I would be willing to buy soaps off you all here (loaf size ) if you sold it for good prices. Nothing
Ike a hot shower with a dreamy bar of soap after a long day!
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  #42  
Old 06-12-2011, 05:10 AM
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I know lye is caustic but.... no lye.... no soap. That's pretty much the way it goes. There's no substitute for lye if we're making soap. Every bar of soap we buy contains lye. Even the Johnson's baby bars and all the soaps that are advertised as "hypo-allergenic" contain lye. I'm pretty sure we can't buy a bar of soap that doesn't contain lye.... not even glycerin soaps. I found out glycerin is a by product of the soap making process so even glycerin contains lye. I learned this when the boys were little and I was trying to avoid any craft project that had lye in it.... not possible. All those kiddie soap making kits that come with the molds and the blocks of glycerin... contain lye but... they're safe enough. The only thing we had to watch for was that they didn't splash themselves with the hot glycerin once they melted it. Small gravy ladles worked well enough for that. They could pour a half a ladle into their form.... add their little plastic spider or what ever little figurine they wanted to their soap... then top off the mold with more glycerin. Nice little project for little hands and... they made it themselves so they were all into washing their hands more.... that's a good thing.
--
No substitutes for lye out there when we're making soap but there are soap substitutes out there, http://www.rootsimple.com/2010/03/wh...soap-nuts.html and http://www.wildsoapnuts.com.au/index.php?p=1_8. I've tried most of them since they were "billed" as being more natural. Some work so so.... some work sorta less than so so. Making our own soap with fat and lye would actually be more "natural" from what I learned about the species of soap nut plants and... I found that lye soaps clean better.
--
"love the real good smelling ones like chocolate Carmel or orange grapefruit. Makes me feel like a queen Bathing with it." I love em too.... especially the pumpkin spice soaps and actually there's too many to list that I love with food fragrances. Problem is when I buy those.... I start eating like a "queen". I dunno what it is that sets me off when I use them but they make my hungry so.... I start eating. I stick to my store bought 'Pure & Natural' or the goat's milk and oatmeal type soaps these days to avoid getting the munchies when I'm in the bathtub.
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  #43  
Old 06-12-2011, 05:10 PM
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karlamaria Female karlamaria is offline
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wait, I never see lye in peoples sopas they make on ebay?? they list the ingredients and none of them say lye. are you sure about all soaps being made of lye?

Why Use Lye for Soapmaking?

Lye is an essential ingredient for converting oils and fats in soap. Without it, the soap would not be able to break down when it comes into contact with water; it is commonly used in commercial soapmaking to bind all of the ingredients together; it is a very caustic agent, and can cause skin burns if too much is used in a particular mixture. Lye is traditionally used for lard-based soaps, and is often used to create the classic, ‘rugged’ style soap bars. When it is present in soap in the right quantities, lye soap can help relieve poison ivy rashes, reduce the symptoms of eczema, kill fleas and danger on bets, and may even work better than bleach to remove stains.
However, lye can be a particularly abrasive ingredient; if you are interested in making light and delicate soaps using everyday ingredients, herbal ingredients and essential oils, you can make bars of soap without lye. This process is often called ‘rebatching’ or melt-and-pour method, because you will be melting glycerin and other products into molds, and do not need to undergo the traditional soapmaking process. Many people who make hand-milled soap or handcrafted soaps rely on this process.
Benefits of Making Soap Without Lye

Lye-free soap is generally much gentler on the skin and soap makers can use a variety of essential oils and herbal ingredients to make delicately scented soap products. Lye-free soap has other benefits; you can:
  • Use the ingredients to make very detailed soap designs
  • Use a variety of colors
  • Use freeze-dried fruits and vegetables in the soap
  • Use dried petals and flowers
  • Use intricate molds for the soap
  • Enjoy the soap right after the molding process is complete!
How to Make Glycerine-Based Soap

Supplies and Tools Needed:
  • Double broiler or crock pot
  • Glyercerine soap base
  • Essential oils
  • Fragrances
  • Cocoa Butter, melted
  • Coloring
The Process:
Place the glycerine into the double boiler or crock pot and set the heat setting high enough to make it melt. Melt it until all of the moisture is removed, but the soap is not too hot that it begins to bubble. First add the color so that the glycerine is evenly coated and absorbs all of the coloring. Slowly stir in your selection of essential oils and fragrances. Add the melted cocoa butter and keep stirring until the mixture is very smooth and even. When the mixture is completely bound together, slowly pour the hot mixture into molds. Allow the soap to harden in the molds until set before using.

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  #44  
Old 06-12-2011, 05:14 PM
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karlamaria Female karlamaria is offline
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How to Rebatch Soap

If you like a particular fragrance or type of soap from the store, you can rebatch the soap by cutting it down and then adding your own additional scents, flowers or other ingredients to it. Rebatching soap means you don’t have to undergo the entire soapmaking process – any lye used to create the soap is already in it, so all you will need to do is chop up the soap pieces and use in your mixture.
Supplies and Tools Needed:
  • Double broiler or crock pot
  • Soap – shredded or cut into small chunks
  • Whole milk
  • Essential oils
  • Fragrances
  • Flowers, dried fruits or vegetables
  • Cocoa Butter or Aloe Vera, melted
  • Coloring
The Process:
Place the shredded soap into a double broiler or crock pot, then add the milk to it. Heat it until the soap melts completely, but do not allow this mixture to bubble or foam up. Next, add the color, oils, fragrances and other items and keep stirring everything together. Pour the soap into the molds, and let it settle for a few weeks until the soap is very firm and hard.
Some people who use the rebatching process for soap like to use goat’s milk to create a very smooth texture. Goat’s milk can be found at health foods stores, gourmet food stores and some grocery stores. You can also purchase it in bulk if you will be making soap with this process on a regular basis.
Finding Soap Recipes that Do Not Contain Lye

You can find dozens of books and guides for natural soapmaking, and many herbal stores and natural food centers offer classes in making soap without lye. In most cases, you will be working with natural ingredients and no animal products – vegetable soap recipes and essential oil-based recipes are becoming increasingly popular as people move away from using and making milk-based and lard-based soaps.
You can find hundreds of natural soap recipes online. Some valuable resources for soap made without lye include:
SoapNaturally.org: http://www.soapnaturally.org/soap_recipes/index.html
Cranberry Lane: http://www.cranberrylane.com/recipes.htm
Miller’s All-Vegetable Soaps: http://www.millersoap.com/soapallveg.html
Making soaps without lye offers a number of benefits for the skin, and you can use a variety of minerals, vitamins and ingredients to treat specific skin conditions. Using herbal oils and some types of scents gives you a chance to be creative with aromatherapy blends.
Whether you’re a beginning soap maker or want to try some new recipes for your soapmaking hobby, you can get started with popular soaps such as:
  • Chamomile soap
  • Citrus soaps
  • Honey based soaps
  • Coconut soap
  • Chocolate soap
  • Oatmeal soap
  • Bentonite Clay soap
  • All-vegetable soaps
  • Coffee soaps
  • Cranberry soap
  • Vanilla soap
  • Aniseed soap
  • Soymilk soap
  • Buttermilk soap
  • Lavender soap
  • Mint soap
  • Pumpkin soap
  • Olive soap
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  #45  
Old 06-12-2011, 11:09 PM
oldtimer oldtimer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karlamaria View Post
Does one have to use lye? Not sure I wNt it in my soap. I buy loaf soaps so I can cut to my desire size. I hate small bars of soap. We love the 14 oz bars or bigger lol.
I love the milk soaps, and love the real good smelling ones like chocolate Carmel or orange grapefruit. Makes me feel like a queen Bathing with it. I would be willing to buy soaps off you all here (loaf size ) if you sold it for good prices. Nothing
Ike a hot shower with a dreamy bar of soap after a long day!

Excuse me, without lye, all you would have is grease. Do you use store bought soap? Store bought detergents? They have all been made with lye. Lye is a necessary product in the saponofication process. Once the lye has worked on the grease or oil used to make the soap, it has undergone a chemical change. You don't have to be afraid of it at that point and I'm sure you've discovered that for yourself, you just have never realized it unless you've never washed before. Pardon me for being sarcastic, but I love how so many people are afraid of homemade soap because of the "lye" but they'll readily throw money down to buy "wonderful storebought soap" and they don't realize it's made with lye too.

We're living in a culture here in America that thinks because it comes off the shelf, it's wonderful. We have people who would buy eggs in the supermarket but would never buy them from me or any other farmer. They'd buy an old Tyson chicken from the store but not a real farm raised natural chicken. They'll buy store bought milk, but wouldn't touch raw milk, the pesticide loaded stuff you buy in the produce aisle at the store, but they wouldn't think to grow a garden or buy at a roadside stand.

Well, I'm ranting now. Anyway, don't be afraid of the lye. Shoot, lye is even used to make hominy and lutefisk. Have you ever eaten them?
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  #46  
Old 06-13-2011, 03:29 PM
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KM> "wait, I never see lye in peoples sopas they make on ebay?? they list the ingredients and none of them say lye. are you sure about all soaps being made of lye?" I'm pretty sure. No lye.... no soap.
--
Their product advertising seems very misleading.... it's probably targeting those who feel they need an alternative to traditional lye soaps so.... they're appealing to our perceived inner need to be lye-free by providing... a glycerin soap.
--
Sometimes it's not what ads tell us but what they don't tell us. Looks like the truth is.... those glycerin soaps all contain lye and probably in higher concentrations than the traditional lye soaps, http://journeytoforever.org/biodiesel_glycerin.html -
Quote:
Glycerine (glycerin, glycerol) is the main by-product of making biodiesel. The name comes from the Greek word glykys meaning sweet. It is a colourless, odourless, viscous, nontoxic liquid with a very sweet taste and has literally thousands of uses. That is, pure glycerine has thousands of uses -- the biodiesel by-product is crude (and it's not colourless, and it's not only glycerine).
Quote:
What sinks to the bottom of the biodiesel processor during the settling stage is a mixture of glycerine, methanol, soaps and the lye catalyst. Most of the excess methanol and most of the catalyst remains in this layer. Once separated from the biodiesel, adding phosphoric acid to the glycerine layer precipitates the catalyst out and also converts the soaps back to free fatty acids (FFAs), which float on top. You're left with a light-colored precipitate on the bottom, glycerine/methanol/water in the middle, and FFA on top. The glycerine will be approx. 95% pure, a much more attractive product to sell to refiners. Here's how to do it: Separating glycerin.FFAs.
Here's why I think what they're not "saying" about their glycerin products is.... at the very least.... not-so-above-board,
Quote:
The crude glycerine by-product from homemade biodiesel makes a powerful degreaser.

Remove the residual methanol first.

Letting the by-product stand in an open container for a few weeks will NOT evaporate the methanol as it's often said it will, or not much anyway.

Boil it off -- NOT over an open flame, do it in the open, don't inhale any fumes, or (better) use a simple condenser to recover the methanol for re-use.

The disadvantage of raw by-product is that it contains most of the lye catalyst used in the processing, which makes it very caustic, it can burn the skin if you don't use gloves.

Saponifying the by-product makes an even better cleaner, and it's not caustic so it won't burn your skin -- in fact it's kind to the skin because of the high glycerine content. Glycerine moisturizes the skin and it's a natural product of the soapmaking process, but commercial soap manufacturers remove the glycerine for use in lotions and creams, which are more profitable. Handcrafted soap retains the glycerine, and hence the boom in do-it-yourself craft soapmaking, and the high prices of handmade soaps.




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  #47  
Old 06-14-2011, 01:43 AM
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karlamaria Female karlamaria is offline
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Thanks equal for the info appreciate it girl, and old timer cool it, I do not buy store bought soap, and have purchased it for years from a gal who makes Bar soap. Did not know it had lye, it does not list it in the ingredients. Funny how people assume.. Making an ass out of me and you ! I have purchased store bought detergent, but lye is not on my box. I also plan to make homemade from here on out as I found a good recipe. Instead of blowing chunks and being rude maybe explaining things would be nice.
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  #48  
Old 06-14-2011, 01:58 AM
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Originally Posted by FloridaWyld View Post
Try the egg test, which I know has been around since at least the 1400s: float a raw egg (shell intact) in the cooled lye solution. If the egg sinks, the lye solution is weak and won't work. If the egg seems to be floating completely on the top of the solution, it's too strong and will be lye heavy at the end. If it floats with just a portion of the egg above, it should be the right strength.

My honest suggestion would be to create a batch of lye solution that is exactly the strength you need using measured, store-bought ingredients, then use the egg test on it. This will give you a benchmark for comparison in future tests with the self-generated lye solution.
Do remember it needs to be a fresh egg! An older egg will float like that and a rotten egg will float completely. Also, be careful when dipping the egg in the lye solution or getting it out again. Lye burns the skin!!!

Keep vinegar handy to put on if you splash lye solution on your skin. It will netrelize it. I have a scar on my arm to this day where I was fooling around when Mama made soap when I was a kid. She left the soap to do something else. I was like twelve and was playing with the soap and some splashed on my arm. It burned like heck until Mama put some vinegar on it to stop the burning but I still carry the scar from being so stupid.
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  #49  
Old 07-13-2011, 09:32 PM
aprilconnett Female aprilconnett is offline
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"wait, I never see lye in peoples sopas they make on ebay?? they list the ingredients and none of them say lye"

Did you notice that the chemical name for lye is sodium hydroxide? Now go look at the ingredients list on a bar of soap. Does say something like sodium tallowate or sodium palmate? The sodium in these ingredients is the sodium from the lye. This also lets you know what type of oil was used in the soap. The tallowate is tallow (beef fat) and the palmate is palm oil. The chemical reaction between the sodium hydroxide and the tallow is what makes sodium tallowate.
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  #50  
Old 07-13-2011, 09:35 PM
aprilconnett Female aprilconnett is offline
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"However, lye can be a particularly abrasive ingredient; if you are interested in making light and delicate soaps using everyday ingredients, herbal ingredients and essential oils, you can make bars of soap without lye. This process is often called ‘rebatching’ or melt-and-pour method, because you will be melting glycerin and other products into molds, and do not need to undergo the traditional soapmaking process. Many people who make hand-milled soap or handcrafted soaps rely on this process."


The reason that the melt-and-pour, or re-batching, method does "not need to undergo the traditional soapmaking process," is because it already has undergone the process and you are just re-melting it with extra ingredients.
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  #51  
Old 07-14-2011, 02:09 AM
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You're right, aprilconnet, so many of the processes people now days call "making soap" without lye, is simply remelting a product that already had lye.
People get all het up over lye with visions of "granny's lye soap" from having watched the Beverly Hillbillies. As if lye is something terrible,

Ever eat hominy or lutefisk? They use lye to make both.

Kalamaria, forgive me if you think I was being rude. I just wanted you to know your store bought soaps contain lye the same as homemade soaps. And no one can make an ass out of someone else unless you let them, so take a deep breath and smell the soap.

No lye, no soap. And FWIW, I for one would heap rather make soap from tallow and grease I've saved than to use this palm oil. The whole palm oil industry business is rather shady if you read up on it. Better to use what I have on hand and can produce myself.
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  #52  
Old 07-22-2011, 09:27 PM
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I've learned to make liquid soaps have never tried the cold process soaps. I really enjoy it, I wanted to learn how to make liquid soaps because you can use it for so many different things, laundry, dishes, bath gels, and shampoos. I have yet to find a good 'soap' shampoo though, leaves a film on my hair. It's ok if I use a lemon, chamomile and distilled hair rinse afterwards, this helps cut the buildup the soap leaves. Would anyone like to share recipes?
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  #53  
Old 07-23-2011, 10:42 AM
OldSchool Male OldSchool is offline
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Hey Old Timer! I made several batches of tallow soap about two months ago, but they still have a stronger scent than my lard batches do. The fat doesn't smell bad, but it does smell stronger than lard. I only used a 1% discount so there would not be much extra fat in it. The fat was fresh from the butcher. My hands don't smell so great after washing them with it! So far I just plan on waiting months to see it if goes away. And I have about 300 bars of it...

Any thoughts?
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  #54  
Old 07-23-2011, 11:05 AM
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I find making homemade soap pricer than buying soap. Where do you get your supplies, especially the lye? Best way to keep the cost down?
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  #55  
Old 07-23-2011, 09:06 PM
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We buy it 25# at a time but we make a lot of soap and buy it from a local chemical company.

You can buy it on ebay if no where else. A can of lewis lye from the grocery store, some grease you would normally throw away and maybe a little borax makes a lot of soap and only costs a couple bucks. You can't buy soap that cheaply.
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  #56  
Old 07-23-2011, 09:21 PM
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We buy it 25# at a time but we make a lot of soap and buy it from a local chemical company.

You can buy it on ebay if no where else. A can of lewis lye from the grocery store, some grease you would normally throw away and maybe a little borax makes a lot of soap and only costs a couple bucks. You can't buy soap that cheaply.
I will definitely look into these items as opposed to the pricey items I've been buying. Thanks for the info!
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Old 07-23-2011, 09:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtimer View Post
We buy it 25# at a time but we make a lot of soap and buy it from a local chemical company.

You can buy it on ebay if no where else. A can of lewis lye from the grocery store, some grease you would normally throw away and maybe a little borax makes a lot of soap and only costs a couple bucks. You can't buy soap that cheaply.
I will definitely look into these items as opposed to the pricey items I've been buying. Thanks for the info!

I buy my lye from Essential Depot.com, last time I got it at a steep discount because they were having a moving sale. Might want to compare prices with them.
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