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  #1  
Old 04-10-2012, 02:58 PM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
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Default Burning tires

I have a few tires to get rid of on our property, and I'll have four more when I change out the tires on one of our cars.

The city makes it PITA for consumers to get rid of tires, and it occured to me that they're mostly oil - maybe they could be burned as fuel.

Found this article http://www.seas.columbia.edu/earth/w...e_recovery.pdf that says tires are comparable to coal as a fuel source.

Would be interesting if you could use tires along with wood in an outdoor boiler, but I could only find industrial uses for tires as fuel.

I suspect if you got the temps high enough in the furnace, the smoke wouldn't be all that stinky, but I"ve never burned coal so it's just a guess.
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  #2  
Old 04-10-2012, 03:40 PM
grumble Male grumble is offline
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If you just burn them in open air, they're stinky and smoky. To do it right, you either need a secondary combustion chamber or forced air, or both. And, you need to chop them up into little pieces to increase the surface area.
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Old 04-10-2012, 05:29 PM
HuntingHawk HuntingHawk is offline
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You may want to check local laws first.

Ross
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  #4  
Old 04-10-2012, 10:26 PM
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I was told at one time a family had a home made incinerator they used to burn household garbage and such. It was big enough it would hold a layer of scrap wood. One or two old tires at a time and a load of garbage on top.

It had a burning chamber larger than a 55 gallon drum to handle this, and about a 6 or 8" smoke stack with 1/4" hardware cloth spark arrester. For a total of about 10' high.

They only had to fire it 4-5 times a year. And when they cleaned it out there was all the hardware to recycle.

Of course this was in the country where they could get burn permits to do brush piles and such also.

Good luck
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  #5  
Old 04-11-2012, 12:52 PM
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backlash Male backlash is offline
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I would not burn them.
They will stink and create a lot of black smoke.
The fire department might show up and they can issue big fines for things like that.
We are lucky here the local dump charges $1 per tire to dump them.
Some idiot just dumped 100 tires into the irrigation canal.
My brother had to fish them all out.
He was not happy at work that day.
The tire stores around here also take them but not sure what they charge.
I have never heard of a good use for recycling large quantities of old tires.
There are millions of them piled up.
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Old 04-11-2012, 04:03 PM
MooseToo MooseToo is offline
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i once heard of a project to grind tires and add the particulate to asphalt for paving - don't know if it was successful or not -
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Old 04-11-2012, 04:43 PM
kfander Male kfander is offline
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Tires are recycled for a lot of things. They are used as surface material in school playgrounds, I know, because our school system is using it, and a lot of people use large numbers of tires in berms. As the land that my cabin is on slopes, I am thinking of using some tires to create a berm separating the area where the cabin is and the graywater field below. In Millinocket, recycled truck tires are frequently seen serving that purpose, some of which have been in use for several decades.
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Old 04-12-2012, 11:04 AM
ScrubbieLady ScrubbieLady is offline
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There are places that recylce tires. They have to certified by the feds and they have territories. The one around here charges to take in the tires. $100/ton, I think. When I asked them why they charged to take in the tires when they were just using them for raw materials to resell, they stopped talking to me and repeated the litany about what they charged for them. Around here, if you buy a tire, you automatically pay a fee to the tire store for disposal of your old tire(supposedly it is a government fee). EVEN if you take the tires with you.
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  #9  
Old 04-12-2012, 01:29 PM
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Aren't tires like batteries in that they charge a fee when you buy them that goes toward disposal? Maybe that is local? I'll ask around.

Have seen them chipped to use in septic drain field in place of washed gravel. The steel cords probably make it tough to use in repaving. Maybe not?

Caprolactam is the stuff that smells when burned. It's a constituent of nylon. Ask me how I know that!
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  #10  
Old 04-12-2012, 01:33 PM
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If you're going to burn them, do it at night when no one can see the black smoke.
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  #11  
Old 04-12-2012, 01:55 PM
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Several years ago the state paved a road with recycled tires.
Months later it started to smoke and eventually started to burn.
They had to remove all the old tire paving and lay down asphalt.
Maybe the process has been improved by now.
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  #12  
Old 04-12-2012, 02:07 PM
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There are several oil related products that can be reclaimed from tires. Of course the steel wire is recyclable. I guess the problem is, it takes energy to seperate these useable items.

I know several rifle ranges that have used tires to build berms between ranges. Also some places have used them to build berms to store dairy cattle feed and short term outdoor grain storage.

I have wondered why they couldn't be used as a tool in land erosion control and such as that. I'm sure there are good ways to use them. In places where looks aren't an issue, at least.

Good luck
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  #13  
Old 04-12-2012, 02:46 PM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
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The EPA (currently) recognizes tire burning as a valid method of disposal, at least on an industrial scale. I've read there are chemical leaching issues with most of the other disposal/reuse methods. Not sure what the future will hold. The regulations I've found largely are limited to open burning (a pile of wood/tires/whatever) and there seems to be a grey area using tires in a controlled burn such as a furnace.

In my case, I have a stack of about 7 tires that I collected off our property - left by others. I bought a slightly used set of tires for one of our cars off a guy on Craiglslist, so it's up to me to get rid of the 4 currently on the car.

It's a pain, but I can get rid of them via the city. May take awhile since I'd have to take off work when the "convenient" collection times are scheduled. Same with the used oil I have stacking up in my garage.

It just seems a waste. There's a a lot of energy in tires, and I'm going to generate used ones every few years.

I've been researching outdoor furnaces for our place. Would like to build a small waste-oil burning furnace to heat my garage in Cleveland as an experiment. It's uninsulated, so I think it would be equivalent to heating a larger cabin on our rural place.

One option is pyrolyzing the tires into a burnable oil. That would at least give me some energy and allow me to dispose of much less material in the waste stream (plus I could recycle the steel belts).

I've also thought about an outdoor wood-burning furnace, possibly something like a modified rocket, and with the high temps, that may allow me to burn some tires as supplemental fuel without too much odor.

I've also found that it's pretty easy to pyrolize many plastics into a burnable fuel.

We have wood on our place, but that's a fair amount of time and work to harvest. Seems like being able to utilize diverse sources of what are essentially garbage, would be a real benefit.

The easiest energy source would be waste motor oil and/or waste vegetable oil. Right now, those are plentiful and cheap (often free) and utilizing them is easiset. Just looking for more potential sources of inexpensive heat.
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  #14  
Old 04-12-2012, 07:40 PM
Mom5farmboys Mom5farmboys is offline
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A couple of years ago we contacted our garbage disposal service and asked about putting tires into our trash recepticle and if they would accept it, what they told us was that if we cut off the side walls (so the tire is in 3 pieces--2 sidewalls and the tread) that they would take it. Its the contstruction of a tire that was the problem for them, without cutting it up it takes up much more room in a landfill than if you cut the sidewalls off.
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  #15  
Old 04-14-2012, 09:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MooseToo View Post
i once heard of a project to grind tires and add the particulate to asphalt for paving - don't know if it was successful or not -
They use them for that and I have seen a rubber landscaping mulch product they make from them as well.
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  #16  
Old 04-15-2012, 11:30 PM
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If I was going to burn tires for heat I would use them more as a octane buster than as the main source of the fire. I would cut the tires up into small pieces and add just a few pieces with the stoking of the fire.

QGM
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  #17  
Old 05-13-2012, 08:33 PM
OzarkCountryboy OzarkCountryboy is offline
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Rob, In Mo there is no fee tacked on to the price to dispose of the tire however if you want to dispose of your old ones they'll gladly charge between 5 and 10 bucks per tire depending on what shop your at. As for the battery deal you referred to, I think your talking about core charges that are involved in battery purchases. In that case you are charged 7-10 bucks extra until you turn in your old battery at which time you are refunded the core charge. So in that case your actually making money to recycle your old battery. Don't we all wish tires were that way. I could make a living cleaning up the county road ditches and hollows around here as they seem to be the catch all for every bum who just wants to dump their tires for free.

As for uses for old tires. Stick em in the yard, fill with dirt and plant tomatoes. A local guy around here takes old tires cuts them into the childrens swings that look like a horse. I've heard of folks building walls out of them to create a bullet proof wall for security purposes. Stack em up into a house shape to make a permanent deer blind. There's lots of uses just let the imagination run wild. Read somewhere recently where someone hung tires over the top of fence post and filled the lower parts with dirt and planted cucumbers in them and picked em off the fence when they ripened.

Last edited by OzarkCountryboy; 05-13-2012 at 08:55 PM.
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  #18  
Old 05-13-2012, 08:41 PM
kfander Male kfander is offline
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I agree. There are so many good uses for old tires that I don't understand why anyone would worry about how to get rid of them. I was just given permission to take away a bunch of tires that are in a vacant lot here, where I'm staying for the summer. I'll be using them as a berm to control erosion, but have also used them as planters and can think of a lot of other uses for them.
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Old 05-13-2012, 09:57 PM
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I have made two retaining walls out of tires for two gardens. Filled them with dirt. In some of the nooks and crannies I planted thyme.
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  #20  
Old 05-14-2012, 03:42 PM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
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From what I've read on the web, there seems to be some concern with chemical leaching from tires in the ground.

I'm sorta reluctant to use them for landscaping-type applications because of that. Our place is remarkably pristine and uncontaminated, save for some metal junk lying around, since it was abandoned for so long.

Of course, there's issues with burning them and dealing with the ashes and smoke. I thought that at high enough temps, that would moot most of the smoke problem, and the ashes could be dealt with in the trash stream off property.
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