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Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Education/Homeschool

Education/Homeschool Homeschooling, adult education, teaching self-reliance, and anything else education-related.

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  #1  
Old 04-15-2012, 06:00 PM
jeanb jeanb is offline
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Default anyone prepping for homeschool?

Since I have four kids in different grades I am finding it hard to know how or what to prep for homeschooling. I purchase some of the Specrum and Horizons work books, but am at a lost at what other supplies and books I need to stock.
Thanks
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  #2  
Old 04-15-2012, 10:12 PM
Cil Female Cil is offline
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What sort of "non-school" subjects do they like? Farmimng, cooking, auto shop? DYI books would be great. Along with plenty of pens, pencils, paper, etc.
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  #3  
Old 04-17-2012, 12:43 PM
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LottieDa Female LottieDa is offline
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The most fundamental tools for our homeschooling was blank paper. THe kind you put in your printer with colored pencils, crayons, and pen and ink. We supplied this from the time they could pick up a pencil.


Visiting second hand stores always yielded excellent textbooks which we used to unit stuides or as resources. Occassionaly if a chapter was really well done, we'd play public school and go straight through it. A large atlas, a book of historical artifacts complete with pictures and explanations pique the intrest across all age groups. Depending on your phliosophy, a full color map of the body is always interesting and they can learn the names of bones or organs and their locations very casually.

I always checked with the online public school standards to use as a guideline for ideas we could work on. I thought it was somewhat (not extremely) important for them to have some working knowledge that was similar to their peers. I liked also offering diverse information and skill. Keeps life interesting.

The DIY books mentioned above is a great idea. Really great. I'd go with that. Have the kids read the instructions, repeat back what they think it's saying, use measuring tools, vocabulary...really it covers (and can cover)several topics at once. Just be careful not to make it to "learny" or they'll not engage.

Pens, Paper, books of all kinds, tools and space...homeschooling at it's best. Have fun. You'll work out what you need as the days progress.
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  #4  
Old 04-25-2012, 11:23 PM
marnee marnee is offline
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If you're wanting ideas on _what_ to teach, you can google your state's content standards for public school, then create your own ways of teaching them.
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  #5  
Old 05-05-2012, 11:48 AM
goldengate goldengate is offline
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If you feel that the workbooks will cover the academic basics, then great extra material comes from National Geographic magazines. They are often available for free or for cheap from libraries that are "cleaning house". Another great, economical source for enhancing text materials is to go through the books at the library's book sale. The variety is huge. The price is right and the material is usually trustworthy. After all, they are culling books that aren't checked out much..the old fashioned ones that only tell facts...not politically- correct- brainwashing- stuff.
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  #6  
Old 05-19-2012, 01:57 PM
jeanb jeanb is offline
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I think I am going to stock books on the Holocaust and history of America. I want the kids to know the true story of the Holocaust and American history. So if you have some good book tiles, I could sure use them.
Thanks
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  #7  
Old 10-21-2012, 08:58 AM
Mma800 Female Mma800 is offline
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I try to prep for homeschooling as well. I have a bin with the old workbooks from my girls who are now in grades 6 and 5. I can use these for my son who is in grade 2. I throw in almost empty notebooks when they come home from school. I also store the pencils etc. that come in birthday party goody bags. Lots of Valentine's Day pencils in there!I have been collecting Classic Books and any Math textbooks I can find from tag sales.
Usually I deal with this homeschool bin at the end of the school semesters and hope that I never need to use it!
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  #8  
Old 10-21-2012, 06:57 PM
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I'm not a big workbook fan. It means re-purchasing.

Textbooks for the core. Stock up on dime spirals and pens/pencils and colored pencils in July/August when everything is super cheap. Each subject has their own spiral. All their work is done in it... sometimes questions from chapter reviews, sometimes questions I think are important, sometimes drawing and diagramming, whatever. No need to repurchase workbooks, save the text book for the next student in line.

Library sales, second hand stores, garage sales, Salvation Army, and Goodwill are where the majority of our books come from... some are text books, most are not. I pick up history commentaries, biographies, how-to, cookbooks, instruction manuals, Haynes repair manuals, pattern books, classic novels, gardening books, crafting books, ANYTHING with useful life skills can be used for schooling and should be.

I LOVE Dover coloring books. LOVE. Those I do buy new but they are only $4 and they fit beautifully into whatever time period we are in history.

Also, one of my favorite hs'ing sites... http://www.oldfashionededucation.com ... Quailty education on the cheap. She has created full lesson plans from K-12. Lots of info/ideas to glean and I also use it as a baseline to make sure we are pretty much on track.
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Last edited by Mesquite_Bean; 10-21-2012 at 07:02 PM.
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  #9  
Old 10-24-2012, 08:24 PM
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I dont have little ones at home and grandchildren are all grown except one and he's in the 10th grade.

I come in here once in awhile and have begun to wonder?

IF the SHTF how will folks educate their little ones.

I think we have seriously neglected this part of the forum.

What will you do?
No public school?
Will you network and trade school lessons?

Do any of you have any thought on this?

Interesting----
Txanne
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  #10  
Old 10-25-2012, 09:50 AM
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We homeschooled our girls, after we pulled them out of the public school system because our oldest daughter was assaulted on the playground by 7 young ladies.

They were pulled out at the end of 4th grade and 2nd grade. I am sure that we did not do enough when it came to computer skills but I know that everything else was covered.

They are now 27years old and happily married with a skill for cutting hair and just recently went back to school for pharmacy work and 25 years old and about to graduate in May with a sociology degree with a 3.7 gpa.

We did not have any special textbooks except for math. We used the library, internet, various people. Lots of reading material, books, magazines, newspapers. Kids want to learn, if we let them. They will tell you how and what. Just listen.
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  #11  
Old 10-25-2012, 08:45 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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Are slates still to be had? They are great to practice writing on, what if there is no paper.
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  #12  
Old 10-26-2012, 12:48 AM
kfander Male kfander is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bookwormom View Post
Are slates still to be had? They are great to practice writing on, what if there is no paper.
Yes, you can find them on Amazon.com. If you look at the section about "Customers who viewed this item also viewed", you will see several other sizes and options.
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  #13  
Old 11-11-2012, 08:06 PM
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Bootz Female Bootz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanb View Post
Since I have four kids in different grades I am finding it hard to know how or what to prep for homeschooling. I purchase some of the Specrum and Horizons work books, but am at a lost at what other supplies and books I need to stock.
Thanks
If there is a SHTF situation, what you would choose to teach would probably differ from what you would teach now. Also, you might not have much paper or ability to replace consumable workbooks.

If it's you, kids, some candles, and a limited supply of paper here are some of my suggestions. Some of them are out of print, but still readily available and cheap.

How to Tutor (teaches math and phonics by copying charts)

Professor B Arithmetic (uses a lot of oral recitation)

Writing Road to Reading 4th edition (The spelling is more complete than in later editions, and the last edition written by the author.)

Writing Road to Reading 6th edition (for the cursive handwriting instructions)

What Your _ Grader Needs to Know FIRST EDITION books 1-6. (Not the revised edition.)

Draw Write Now (covers far more than handwriting and drawing)

Using Color in Your Art (most lessons can be adapted to a 24 pack of crayons)

The Jumbo Book of Music

I'm going to give this just a bit more thought before I add anything more. I'm really trying to answer your question and not just list things I have liked best during a time and place different from the one your are prepping for.
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Last edited by Bootz; 11-11-2012 at 08:37 PM.
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  #14  
Old 11-11-2012, 08:09 PM
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These free pdfs were designed to be used in Waldorf schools in Africa with limited resources.

http://www.entwicklungshilfe3.de/?id=786
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  #15  
Old 11-11-2012, 08:29 PM
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Writer's Toolbox is a compilation of many of the author's books. You might want to get a few of the books not included.

The Columbia Encyclopedia The last edition is this 2000 edition. This is one BIG book.

World Book Encyclopedia or the New Book of Knowledge. If you keep looking, you will get lucky and find an older series for cheap. Ask your library what they do with old sets. Compton's is the only other publisher that is appropriate for children. Several broken but overlapping sets works pretty well and can usually be acquired for free.

Merriam-Webster Concise Dictionary has an easy to read pronunciation system. You can teach the children to look up how words are pronounced. The definitions are very short, but good. You will need another dictionary for lengthy explanations of all possible definitions.
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  #16  
Old 11-11-2012, 08:45 PM
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Richard Aufmann wrote a series of math books to be used in remedial classes at junior colleges. Half the answers are in the back. You can find older editions for pennies. The series covers arithmetic through college algebra.
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