BHM Forum      
Subscribe to Backwoods Home Magazine print or Kindle editions
Office Hours Momday - Friday  8 am - 5 pm Pacific 1-800-835-2418

Facebook   YouTube   Twitter
Follow Us!



 
Backwoods Home Magazine, self-reliance, homesteading, off-grid

Features
 Home Page
 Current Issue
 Article Index
 Author Index
 Previous Issues
 Newsletter
 Letters
 Humor
 Free Stuff
 Recipes
 Print Classifieds

General Store
 Ordering Info
 Subscriptions
 Kindle Subscriptions
 ePublications
 Anthologies
 Books
 Back Issues
 Help Yourself
 All Specials
 Classified Ad

Advertise
 Web Site Ads
 Magazine Ads

BHM Blogs
 Behind The Scenes
 Massad Ayoob
 Ask Jackie Clay
 Claire Wolfe
 Where We Live
 Dave on Twitter
Retired Blogs
 Oliver Del Signore
 David Lee
 Energy Questions
 Bramblestitches

Quick Links
 Home Energy Info
 Jackie Clay
 Ask Jackie Online
 Dave Duffy
 Massad Ayoob
 John Silveira
 Claire Wolfe

Forum / Chat
 Forum/Chat Info
 Enter Forum
 Lost Password

More Features
 Meet The Staff
 Contact Us/
 Change of Address
 Write For BHM
 Privacy Policy

Retired Features
 Country Moments
 Feedback
 Links
 Radio Show





  
 

BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum
Posting requires Registration and the use of Cookies-enabled browser.

  Who's In The Chat Room

Go Back   BHM Forum > Self-Reliance & Preparedness > Self-reliance > Preparedness/Survival Skills/BOBs/Kits/Gear

Preparedness/Survival Skills/BOBs/Kits/Gear If it will help keep you going when TSHTF, talk about it here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-27-2012, 12:37 AM
marnee marnee is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Southeast Idaho
Posts: 181
Default Would you put MREs in a kid's bob?

My husband and I are thinking of using MREs for food in our kits, but I'm wondering which direction is best to go for our 5 year old's bag. Is it better to just do normal food in a kid's pack, or is it okay to do MREs and some snacks they like (for comfort)?
Reply With Quote

  #2  
Old 04-27-2012, 03:34 AM
randallhilton's Avatar
randallhilton Male randallhilton is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Fort Worth TX
Posts: 1,245
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by marnee View Post
My husband and I are thinking of using MREs for food in our kits, but I'm wondering which direction is best to go for our 5 year old's bag. Is it better to just do normal food in a kid's pack, or is it okay to do MREs and some snacks they like (for comfort)?
I'm eager to see some of this discussion because I've focused more on hydration, concealment/visibility, wound care, getting/staying dry and things like that. For grub I've just tossed in cheap, high calorie, high protein snack food.

Youngsters tend not to be adventurous when it comes to meal time so you might consider old standbys such as peanut butter with honey and crackers. Perhaps you can keep your "comfort foods" together in one area of your pantry. Remember to always rotate the stock. If an event seems imminent, load the grub into the bags.

Note: a 5y.o. is not going to be able to tote a whole lot of weight. A couple of liters of water and a few snacks will be a full load.
__________________

Use less, lose less, weigh the benefits, count the costs.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-27-2012, 11:59 PM
marnee marnee is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Southeast Idaho
Posts: 181
Default

Thanks for the note. I think for kids, it's recommended that their back packs weigh no more than 10 percent of their body weight, which would be about 4-5 pounds for us right now.

The plan is that our son would stay with one of us if something happened, which means that we can make up some of the weight from his pack and just keep enough in his to handle really basic first aid, his personal stuff (hygeine, clothes, light source, keep-dry stuff, small distractions), and just a day's worth of food/water. Then at the end of the day we'd off load the next day's food/water into his pack.

The food that we have in all of our kits is cheap, high calorie stuff, but it seems to take up a lot of room and weight that could be put to better use, worst case. (Best case, of course, is that we just raid them periodically for the flashlights, glow sticks, and junk food during an extended power outage... hey, it helps keep things rotated!)

I've also been considering those high calorie nutrition bars but think those have the potential to be even more of a fail than mres.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-01-2012, 10:51 PM
sethwyo sethwyo is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Thunder basin
Posts: 862
Default No

i do not like or use MREs. no nutrients, toxins, and they dont put people in touch with food.

my pack has a mess kit in it, it has brown rice, lentil beans home made hard tack, food bars made from uncooked oatmeal honey nuts and peanut butter, and even top raman noodles.

you should not plant to live on processed junk food in an emergency situation. MREs are calories and gut filler, the toxins in MREs make you weak and tired, its unhealthy.

giving your kids prepackaged food (so called) is not mentaly health either, teach them what food is and how to cook in the field
__________________
So ya'll use this to escape reality ? Well i am reality potheads.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-02-2012, 03:59 AM
randallhilton's Avatar
randallhilton Male randallhilton is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Fort Worth TX
Posts: 1,245
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sethwyo View Post
i do not like or use MREs. no nutrients, toxins, and they dont put people in touch with food.

my pack has a mess kit in it, it has brown rice, lentil beans home made hard tack, food bars made from uncooked oatmeal honey nuts and peanut butter, and even top raman noodles.

you should not plant to live on processed junk food in an emergency situation. MREs are calories and gut filler, the toxins in MREs make you weak and tired, its unhealthy.

giving your kids prepackaged food (so called) is not mentaly health either, teach them what food is and how to cook in the field
I'm tracking with you on everything but the Ramen noodles because I get headaches from the MSG they use. I really like the concept of packing grains and legumes as long as there are some "quick calories" also packed.

I picked up a box of pre-packaged honey (in single serving pouches) and single serving peanut butter because they last a long time and provide some decent go power. I paid the premium for the packets simply because in a 72 hour scenario we might not have the luxury of cooking.
__________________

Use less, lose less, weigh the benefits, count the costs.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-03-2012, 11:55 AM
whitehairedidiot Female whitehairedidiot is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,514
Default

How about raisins, dried fruit, p'nut butter & honey, oatmeal (it's what's for supper!)... powdered milk/eggs... so this covers carbs, sugar (for energy) and protein.

or - what I'm thinking for ourselves - is vacumn packaging individual portions of a mix of dry ingredients: say... lentils, rice, garlic powder, salt & pepper, dehydrated onions, dehydrated red/green peppers - just add water & cook. Relatively light to carry... and healthy too. Sorta like when you make foil packets for the grill, you know?
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-03-2012, 12:44 PM
randallhilton's Avatar
randallhilton Male randallhilton is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Fort Worth TX
Posts: 1,245
Default

What's wrong with y'all anyway? I thought we were supposed to buy those pre-packaged, vacuum sealed survival rations. Everybody knows we can't survive without those!
__________________

Use less, lose less, weigh the benefits, count the costs.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-03-2012, 01:26 PM
grumble Male grumble is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: W NM, a rifle shot from the Great Divide
Posts: 2,641
Default

A couple weeks ago, I showed up at my son's house and took my 11 yo grandson on a surprise survival camping trip. It was coordinated with his parents, but a complete surprise to the kid. I gave him 15 minutes to pack his survival gear, and off we went into the National forest.

As has been mentioned, I took some bare bones dried stuff (rice, beans, cornmeal, veggies, etc), some taco-flavored TVP, and just in case, a few cans of things.

By the time we got a shelter up and a fire going (nights were about 20*F), it was getting dark. Good excuse for the canned stuff, and I was glad I brought it instead of waiting 45 min or more for the dried stuff to cook. After the coldest night of my life (no sleeping bags, just emergency blankets and pine needles to sleep on), we were exhausted the next morning, and didn't want to do much of anything except feed the fire. More canned food. Kid's attention was wandering, and he had trouble learning the stuff I was trying to teach him about knots, first aid, making things to improve the shelter, and such -- more academics than actually doing things. All of a sudden it was getting too dark to cook, and more canned stuff got opened.

The moral of all this is that in a survival situation, cooking is added time and effort that are hard to come by. You're tired, uncomfortable, and probably impatient. The choice between cooking something and feeding the fire while trying to get some sleep, sleep takes priority. What sounds like a good idea while you're sitting in a comfortable house planning the trip isn't such a good idea when you have to actually do it. Those cans of stuff I took along made the difference between eating and going hungry.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-03-2012, 05:40 PM
marnee marnee is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Southeast Idaho
Posts: 181
Default

I agree with wanting to be able to avoid cooking if possible during such a short term situation. It's extra time, gear, hassle... And since it's for a kid's bag, I want it to be something that worst case scenario, he can handle himself with out having to rely on an adult to prepare it. (It's absolutely not in our plan at all to have him separated from one of us, but things happen and I'd hate for him to be stuck with food that he can't eat.) But, I also want to make sure that it's very calorie and nutrient dense but not excessively heavy (again with trying to provide autonomy as much as possible). The lighter it is, the more he can carry himsef if need be.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-03-2012, 06:20 PM
grumble Male grumble is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: W NM, a rifle shot from the Great Divide
Posts: 2,641
Default

Excellent points, marnee. If you're on the move in a situation like that, canned food is just too heavy to carry with you. If the weather had been better (we had to cut the last day off the adventure because a snowstorm threatened to close the FS roads which would have left us in a REAL survival situation for a week), and we could have hunkered down in a nice base camp, we would have been more able to use the dry food I intended to use.

My whole point is that bugout preps should include some fast and easy stuff, everything takes longer to do than you expect it will, and being tired all the time makes it too easy to not bother to eat.

For those who haven't tried it, I recommend a minimalist camping trip with a kid. You'll BOTH learn a lot.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-03-2012, 06:53 PM
marnee marnee is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Southeast Idaho
Posts: 181
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by grumble View Post
For those who haven't tried it, I recommend a minimalist camping trip with a kid. You'll BOTH learn a lot.
In a few years we'll have to try that out and see how it goes. He's only 5 now, though, and I don't want to put him off the good kind of camping yet.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-04-2012, 11:13 AM
whitehairedidiot Female whitehairedidiot is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,514
Default

Quote:
The moral of all this is that in a survival situation, cooking is added time and effort that are hard to come by.
Excellent point, grumble! And the practice camping situations are absolutely a must. I used to say, you could tell who you could stand being married to... after a day of driving, setting up a tent in the twilight - cooking - etc. I had to learn that one the hard way - LOL... you'd be surprised how many people simply crumble to pieces and expect to waited on in that situation... and here I was, wanting (and needing to, in the height/strength areas) to lean on them!

Dried fruit, raisins, nuts, pnut butter - and yes, anything warm that can be heated with 1c water, quickly - are essential.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -2. The time now is 05:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1996 to Present. Backwoods Home Magazine, Inc.