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BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum
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Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Plants

Plants Plant-related topics that do not have a dedicated board.

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  #1  
Old 03-22-2012, 02:08 AM
samie samie is offline
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Default pumpkin zucchini and watermelon together?

I have limited space and sun and would like to plant these in a raised bed nearby each other so the vines trail out where there is the most sun to be had

-would they conflict? I could knock out the pumpkins if they wont work


ty
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  #2  
Old 03-22-2012, 07:54 AM
tomato204 Male tomato204 is offline
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Default pumpkin

Pumpkin vines are usually real runners with big leaves that might shade out other stuff. Zuc stays where you put it a lot better, vines are short.
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  #3  
Old 03-22-2012, 08:27 AM
BonnyLake BonnyLake is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samie View Post
I have limited space and sun and would like to plant these in a raised bed nearby each other so the vines trail out where there is the most sun to be had

-would they conflict? I could knock out the pumpkins if they wont work

The three plants you want to grow together have a few things in common, which is good.
- they all need watering from the bottom and require about the same amount, so I would put a soaker hose near the stems for easier access
- the zuke stems and leaves will get huge and will shade the soil so they need a 3' square space for each plant - the root/stem will spread across the ground as it gets older.
- the pumpkin and watermelon vines will grow at least 25'. One plant can throw out a half dozen vines so they can go in all different directions. I had mine near an unusable patch of dirt so I covered the ground with black plastic and let the vines cover the top... I had to work with it a little by flopping the vines around, but once the pumpkins & melons start growing, they will get large in a hurry and want to stay in one place. Don't let them lay in standing water or they will rot.
- You can trellis the pumpkins and watermelons along a fence by tying up the vines to the fence, or on stakes, and then securing the fruit in 'hammocks' attached to the fence. These 'hammocks' can be made from 'slings' of material; like burlap, canvas, etc. and can be made large enough to hold all the weight. You can also make 2-sided tee-pee's out of wooden pallets and train the vines up and over the tops back-n-forth several times.

I don't see a problem growing all three together!
Good luck - Bonny
.
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  #4  
Old 03-22-2012, 09:45 AM
Faith123 Female Faith123 is offline
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Default

I've planted all three together with no issues with cross pollination in the past.

However, last year I planted pumpkin, zucchini, delicata squash, and watermelon, along with decorative gourds. The decorative gourds took out ALL my edibles by pollinating them. I had some very interesting gourds at the end of the season, and let the squirrels have at them after Thanksgiving. One zucchini was producting fine, then half-way through the season it started putting out what looked like zukes, but they had a very hard rind and pith and were very bitter!

Luckily the squirrels relocated one of my pumpkin seeds across the yard, so I did get one pumpkin last year!

I know you were concerned about space constraints, but Bonny covered that one quite well!
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  #5  
Old 03-22-2012, 03:27 PM
samie samie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BonnyLake View Post
The three plants you want to grow together have a few things in common, which is good.
- they all need watering from the bottom and require about the same amount, so I would put a soaker hose near the stems for easier access
- the zuke stems and leaves will get huge and will shade the soil so they need a 3' square space for each plant - the root/stem will spread across the ground as it gets older.
- the pumpkin and watermelon vines will grow at least 25'. One plant can throw out a half dozen vines so they can go in all different directions. I had mine near an unusable patch of dirt so I covered the ground with black plastic and let the vines cover the top... I had to work with it a little by flopping the vines around, but once the pumpkins & melons start growing, they will get large in a hurry and want to stay in one place. Don't let them lay in standing water or they will rot.
- You can trellis the pumpkins and watermelons along a fence by tying up the vines to the fence, or on stakes, and then securing the fruit in 'hammocks' attached to the fence. These 'hammocks' can be made from 'slings' of material; like burlap, canvas, etc. and can be made large enough to hold all the weight. You can also make 2-sided tee-pee's out of wooden pallets and train the vines up and over the tops back-n-forth several times.

I don't see a problem growing all three together!
Good luck - Bonny
.
WOW! thank you Bonny That is SO helpful-I want to plant some pumpkins for their seeds and am glad I don't have to give up on the idea

thinking about these pumpkins maybe-
http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/store/ve...kins/snackface

or snack jack-not sure yet

ty again!
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  #6  
Old 03-22-2012, 03:28 PM
samie samie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Faith123 View Post
I've planted all three together with no issues with cross pollination in the past.

However, last year I planted pumpkin, zucchini, delicata squash, and watermelon, along with decorative gourds. The decorative gourds took out ALL my edibles by pollinating them. I had some very interesting gourds at the end of the season, and let the squirrels have at them after Thanksgiving. One zucchini was producting fine, then half-way through the season it started putting out what looked like zukes, but they had a very hard rind and pith and were very bitter!

Luckily the squirrels relocated one of my pumpkin seeds across the yard, so I did get one pumpkin last year!

I know you were concerned about space constraints, but Bonny covered that one quite well!
That is a scary story to tell you the truth-eek

I wont plant gourds that's for sure-are you going to plant pumpkins again this year?

thanks for the tip!
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  #7  
Old 03-23-2012, 02:07 AM
JarDude Male JarDude is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Faith123 View Post
I'v The decorative gourds took out ALL my edibles by pollinating them.
How's that?

Even if they did cross pollinate that would have no effect on the current years "fruit". It would only effect the plants that you grow the following year from the crossed "hybrid" seed.
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  #8  
Old 05-05-2012, 01:12 PM
oldtimer oldtimer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JarDude View Post
How's that?

Even if they did cross pollinate that would have no effect on the current years "fruit". It would only effect the plants that you grow the following year from the crossed "hybrid" seed.
Dude,
You are absolutely correct. Zuchini and pumkins and gourds are all in the same family and will cross with eachother. They will not cross with your melons.

The off taste will not show up in the first year. If you're getting off taste and "interesting" looking fruits. The cross was last year and your seed is already hybridized as JarDude has explained.

FWIW:

Watermelon does not require the water squashes do. Many people falsely assume this. I get a charge out of people who think they need to water their watermelons or make comments about how watermelons use so much water, that's why they're watermelons.

We live in a semiarid region and have some of the best melon growing conditions anywhere. Watermelons do *not* like to be watered. The best growing conditions for watermelons are a sandy soil that does not hold a lot of moisture, hot temps and high humidity. The melons pull in the moisture through their leaves. When we have a fairly dry year with very high humidity, we get the largest melons and by far the sweetest. Watering melons hinders their growth and will make it so the melons aren't sweet.

The only reason to ever water melons is if it's so absolutely dry they'll croak without a drink, then water it to keep it alive, but a little water goes a long ways with melons.

Squashes on the other hand do better with more moisture and don't keep the seed when growing various pumpkins and squashes and gourds all in the same garden, the next generation could turn out awful
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  #9  
Old 05-06-2012, 12:20 AM
samie samie is offline
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real helpful post oldtimer thanks

(my watermelons never sprouted so I'll use this advice next year)
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  #10  
Old 05-06-2012, 02:23 AM
Leanne Female Leanne is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Sunny Southern California
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Default

Hijacking re: watermelons ... I live in a low-humidity zone (southern California). Any ideas as to how to help my melons grow better? I typically only get one or two from a plant. I may well be overwatering them, but it sounds like I should try to make a more humid microclimate for them. I'm not very sure how to do that. Any ideas?
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