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BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum
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Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Homesteading

Homesteading Talk or ask questions about homesteading in general, your homestead, or any other related topic.

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  #1  
Old 11-20-2012, 04:56 PM
Post_Oakie Male Post_Oakie is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: southwest MO
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Default Post and beam shed

Thought some people might be interested in a post and beam shed I'm building. While I'm not following the traditional post and beam building exactly, some of the joinery should be recognizable. No special tools, other than a chain saw, drill, and skill saw-- oh, yes, and a portable sawmill. The shed will house a portable generator, welding equipment, air compressor, large woodworking equipment, and garden tools. I'm not working off a set of published plans, but might make plans available if it works out, and anyone is interested.

I started out by selecting dead and dying trees out in the woods. With the oak dieback due to last summer's drought, we lost a lot of them. I milled 6" x 6" beams and set them on cinder blocks for a foundation. White oak is durable, as long as you keep it off the ground.



Floor joists are 1 x 6 white oak.

With a little fancy cutting on the mill, I was able to cut beam supports into the posts.



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  #2  
Old 11-20-2012, 05:53 PM
offtheradar Male offtheradar is offline
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Nice work. How big is the post and beam? I have been timber framing for 25 years now. It is the only way to build if you have the time and money.
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  #3  
Old 11-20-2012, 06:59 PM
Mad_Professor Mad_Professor is offline
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You now have contracted TFAD: Timber Framing Addiction : )

Your prognosis is dim: You will be buying framing chisels, slicks, boring machines, dividers/compass, chalk lines, plumb bobs...........

Check out Timber Framing Guild for traditional joinery as well as Forestry Forum .

Lots of knowledge and good people at both places.
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  #4  
Old 11-20-2012, 11:21 PM
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DavidOH Male DavidOH is offline
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I absolutely love it!
Post & Beam, White Oak !
As a kid I loved playing under the county fairgrounds grandstands, over 100 years old. All post & beam construction. No nails, No bolts, No screws!
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  #5  
Old 11-21-2012, 11:25 AM
brushhippie brushhippie is offline
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Looks great Oakie!
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  #6  
Old 11-21-2012, 04:04 PM
Post_Oakie Male Post_Oakie is offline
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Thanks for the comments. I'll probably cheat and use metal fasteners this time around. The shed is just a chance to practice on a full-size barn. Next purchases will probably be slicks and chisels. I'm just starting to explore some of the other sites and locating information, so I appreciate suggestions. The diversity of design is really amazing! The greatest thing is when parts actually fit together the way they're supposed to.
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  #7  
Old 11-28-2012, 11:29 AM
Post_Oakie Male Post_Oakie is offline
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Default Shed update

Thought I'd try a framing joint I'd seen, but don't remember the name of it. Maybe a timber framer can help me out. It basically joins two short beams to make a long one without losing much strength. I basically cut half way through the beam at an angle and removed the wood to the outside of the cut. Then flipped the beam over and did the same on the other side, so it looks a little like a pair of scissors. Then did the same to the second beam, and fitted them together. I was amazed that they actually fit tightly. Drill a couple of holes and drive in pegs, and it feels pretty solid. I can cut long beams on my portable sawmill, but like the idea of putting short logs to use.

http://i1238.photobucket.com/albums/...issors_01m.jpg
http://i1238.photobucket.com/albums/...issors_02m.jpg
http://i1238.photobucket.com/albums/...issors_03m.jpg
http://i1238.photobucket.com/albums/...issors_04m.jpg
http://i1238.photobucket.com/albums/...issors_07m.jpg
http://i1238.photobucket.com/albums/...issors_09m.jpg
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  #8  
Old 11-28-2012, 06:09 PM
offtheradar Male offtheradar is offline
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Nice scraf joint! I have made many. The thing that I would do is make a "stop splayed scarf" from the design. This will improve the strength of the joint. The stop splayed scarf would have a square peg (made from two opposing wedges) in the middle of the joint to push the two timbers together. I also would not have points on the timbers as they will have a tendency to split off. It would be better to make returns at about 25 deg to help lock the timber in when the wedges are installed. It is hard to describe, later I will try to post a drawing. You have good talent as the joint is tight and straight.
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  #9  
Old 11-28-2012, 07:39 PM
warriorwolf47 Male warriorwolf47 is offline
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Very interesting ! Thank you .
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  #10  
Old 11-29-2012, 07:23 PM
offtheradar Male offtheradar is offline
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Here is a scarf joint that I like. The advantage is that it can be tightened up after the timber cures. This is laid out with square rule framing as the reference side is the outside. One interesting note on scafs is that the load should be perpendicular to the cut. This scarf would be good for a top beam near a post. Never locate a scarf in the middle of the supports. http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z.../Scafjoint.jpg
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  #11  
Old 11-30-2012, 02:06 PM
Post_Oakie Male Post_Oakie is offline
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Thanks for the idea, Radar. I can picture how it works. I'll give it a try. I'm just experimenting with as many joints and techniques as I can. Cutting those offsets should be interesting. I do see what you mean about locking the pieces in. As for talent, it was probably more beginner's luck that it fit tightly.
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  #12  
Old 12-03-2012, 07:15 PM
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CountryGuy CountryGuy is offline
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wow very nice work! I've always admired post and beam but have never had the chance to do any. I always thought I'd need a toolbox full of special timber tools. You've shown me otherwise!
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