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  #1  
Old 01-18-2013, 02:07 AM
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MYellowRose Female MYellowRose is offline
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How do you encourage your kids or grandkids for that matter to read? I don't need to encourage my oldest two granddaughters, both are voracious readers, but the 7 year old still maintains she can't read. I bought all three of them a Kindle for Christmas as I thought having the same thing her older sisters had might encourage her.
The 8 year old, she turns 9 Saturday, read at 170% of her grade level at the end of first grade. She's already read all the Harry Potter books, told me it only took her two days to read the final one. Yesterday I found she's reading The Hobbit! I think she finds it slow going compared to most of what she reads. Her older sister, who turns 11 on March 1, wants to read it next.
I think that's part of the 7 year old's problem, she doesn't feel like she's as smart as her sisters are. DD thinks she's just lazy as she likes to have the older girls read to her.
Any hints for when I visit them? I've tried to get her to read to me but she won't.
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Old 01-18-2013, 05:10 AM
goldengate goldengate is offline
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That's a tough one but I wouldn't push too hard. Who knows??? Tomorrow may be the day she decides that she can read. Honestly, it might work to just continue to read to her just to keep her interested. Who cares if she wants a little extra attention? She is only seven years old! Keep on reading to her and keep on putting out easy, colorful, attractive books for her to look at. .....You know...that might be a solution. Maybe stop talking about reading at all and just talk about looking at books. Whatever mental block she has might go away if it is re-phrased and ignored Stay relaxed and good luck..
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Old 01-19-2013, 12:28 AM
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Goldengate I'm sure a lot of it is psychological as DD said the kindergarten teacher wouldn't give her any help when she asked and the school officials refused to transfer her to the other kindergarten class. She has to be able to read some as she's doing good in school, in fact my daughter told me Wednesday that she's the only one of the three girls who brought up their grades this last 9 weeks, and she remembered to bring home her report card/ paper.
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Old 01-19-2013, 12:53 AM
Mom5farmboys Mom5farmboys is offline
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Rose,

2 of my boys struggle with reading. We read together for 20-25 min every night. Not a choice. But you can make it fun....you can read a page then she reads a page. Sometimes I read the page first then they re-read the same page.

Sometimes we get really, really easy books......just for fun. If its an easier read it builds confidence...I'm all for challenging them, but I really want them to find pleasure in reading, not have it be a chore or something they HAVE to do.....

Kindergarden, and first grade books...I really like the "I CAN READ" books. Fly Guy is popular and so are graphic novels (glorified comic books).

We have also read the Wimpy Kid books and some of the American Chillers series....the deal we have with the harder books is that they read a paragraph and I read a whole page.

I have also used a reward system...read every night for 25 min (M-TH) and I have gotten them a candy bar or an Icee from the gas station (.99 cents) at the end of the week.

The more she reads the better she will get.....the better she gets the easier it will be, so she will read more. Or at least that is the theory.

I also have one that can read quite well......he reads with expression, and his comprehension is right where it should be.......but he spends so much time trying to convince me how hard it is for him, that we spend longer arguing over doing the nightly reading than actually doing the reading. Thats where the reward system comes in...lets just say he can be bribed

Good luck, I know how important it is and I understand how we worry about them getting this important skill mastered.
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Old 01-19-2013, 10:16 PM
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I just wish that we still lived together. LOL! I'm willing to help her in any way I can. I know she loves the Star Fall web site, or whatever it's called, so I'm sure that eventually she'll do okay. I should have had her read to me when I was staying over there weekly last year before the new baby was born. I'll do what I can when I'm over there. I think instead of playing a game on my computer I'll encourage her to read on it as I've got several kids books on my Kindle app.
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Old 01-20-2013, 06:17 PM
billygoatgruff Male billygoatgruff is offline
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Reading is not fun - unless it is about something one wants to know about. Just ask anyone who has HAD to read TM manuals or Fed Registers for something other than wanting to know what those pages have to say.

What does she like to do, or what does she like? Do you read about those things?

And with a new sibling and her sisters being "readers," maybe she is just wondering what her unique niche is now... and deciding it isn't being just another reader. Don't know.

I'll bet she knows what is going on with reading and her. Trying to get her to tell without coming across as demanding should be challenging tho.

John
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Old 01-20-2013, 08:28 PM
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I agree with billygoatgruff. Reading is no fun if you are not interested. I am the same way, hate reading but I can be hours reading stuff I like. And to my kindle I have just added the Backwoods Home Magazine. That way I can read it when at the doctor's office which can be very boring.
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Old 01-25-2013, 02:10 PM
Mma800 Female Mma800 is offline
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MYR-2 of my kids are great readers (12 and 9 yo) what made the difference for them is finding a series they were totally into. My daughter started with the Warrior Series. My son, Harry Potter. Once they were into it I let them go as much as possible. If they start a book they don't like, I don't make them finish it. Just move on to the next one. Sometimes it goes in phases where they don't stop reading for a week or longer, then don't pick up a book for several days.


My 11 yo is a different story. She just hates it! She has been tested and has no learning difficulties and is learning at above grade level. She just has not found the spark of a great book as entertainment yet. She'd rather doodle and draw or paint. I keep trying new genres and series with her, hoping to stumble on something to light that spark.


All 3 kids have kindles and it's been fabulous to have them, especially in trying new books for my non-reader.


Try some age appropriate magazines. Reading is reading! Audiobooks might be worth a try as well. My kids love them for long car rides. Their kindles have an audio function, but we've only used it a few times.
Trips to the library or bookstore are helpful, especially if they can pick any book that interests them.


Good luck!
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Old 04-07-2013, 12:18 PM
bella Female bella is offline
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how about comic books, they are great ones and for a young reader ,they are very appeling to look at. as a french woman, i will say, have a look at, asterisk le gaullois.
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Old 04-07-2013, 05:08 PM
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MYellowRose Female MYellowRose is offline
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I've noticed she also has a problem writing some of her letters, she confuses the b's & d's and from what I understand sometimes even the p's. She's told her mother that even when she asks the teacher doesn't help and neither will any of the other kids, instead the kids make fun of her. It's getting to be upsetting but there's really no way I can interfere much as I might be willing to do so.
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Old 04-07-2013, 05:23 PM
Mom5farmboys Mom5farmboys is offline
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MYR

I had a few boys who struggled with reading and confusing b, d, p, and the number 9.

Something we did to help with b & d was to write the word bed on the top of their paper or on a flashcard. It's a discreet, effective, visual reference they can use to quickly make sure they've got the right letter.
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Old 05-07-2013, 07:52 PM
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Good replies. She may just not have found what she likes to read yet. Keep reading aloud. I kept the alphabet and numbers posted for my youngest son to refer to until he was almost 9. But also try to rule out dyslexia. If that is a possibility, learn as much about it as you can, and visit some special needs sections on homeschool sites for tips and support. I do not encourage "special ed" because it is not always good for the child, unless you have one of those programs with outstanding instructors who care.
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Old 05-11-2013, 10:05 AM
Mike LI Male Mike LI is offline
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Comic books that's how I started. When my son was born I bought him all the classics he never touched them. I think my expectations of him we're to high. He's not me. But my wife and I hung in there and he found his way. Harry Potter, The Lord of the Rings etc. Then it dawned on me children have vivid imaginations and live in a semi fantasy world so that's why he could relate to this stuff at that time.

You have gotten good advice here, keep going you never know till you try something. Keep it easy and varied. Some schools have what's called an AR program. Google AR book list and you will find thousands of books with description's. In the end I didn't care what he read as long as he was reading and more importantly comprehending what he was reading He could read a cereal box for all I cared. I read a lot of those to BTW I was great at the mazes. Good luck!
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Old 05-24-2013, 03:29 PM
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MYellowRose, I think some folks are readers & some aren't. My one brother & I read anything with inky words on paper. Our other brother will read Enquirers & an article or two from the newspaper & that's it. Never ever does he read a book! I think it's something you either like/wanna do or not. Doesn't mean you can't read if you choose not to. Everybody's different.

Peace~ EarthMama
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Old 06-01-2013, 05:45 PM
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The school wants her in summer school but as my daughter said yesterday "if the teacher had been doing her job there would be no need for summer school". Instead we're trying an incentive to boost her self confidence and help her out with her reading. For each story of 3 or more pages or each book she reads to her mother she'll be paid a quarter and will get the money monthly. DD started a log yesterday, also she's limited to getting paid for just two stories a day, and she read two with almost no help from her mother. I'm adding, and have been since I bought it, kids stories to my Kindle. I'm going to have her read to me also and when she's earned $5 I'll give it to her and she can spend it or save it whichever she wants. DD is also going to put the StarFall app or whatever it's called on her Nexus so Esther can practice that way. We're pretty much sure this is more of a self confidence thing than anything else so we're trying to boost it as much as possible.
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Old 06-02-2013, 11:46 PM
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[QUOTE=MYellowRose;350296]I've noticed she also has a problem writing some of her letters, she confuses the b's & d's....]

Classic sign of dyslexia. That makes reading a real struggle and takes the fun out of it. Dyslexia tends to "cure itself" as the kid gets older, but the problem is, by that time the kid may have already learned not to like reading.

You'd think the teachers would have noticed this.

Isn't it odd that as teachers' union strength and pay have gone up over the past 4 decades, kids' testing scores have gone down?
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Old 06-03-2013, 12:07 AM
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DD says she's been checked for dyslexia, she knows her letters when she looks at them and can rattle them off with no trouble. We're in hopes that the incentive to earn a little money will help encourage her. I'm sure part of the problem is the fact that she was the youngest in the family until Marie came along and then Doug appeared just over two years later so she's now the middle of 5 children.
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