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  #1  
Old 06-07-2011, 09:10 PM
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Default Two home made soap recipes

We've made soap for years.

To whomever is wanting to make soap, you can make a good cheap soap by saving your cooking grease. I don't hold much with this palm vegetable oil junk they call soap.

Save your bacon grease, hamburger grease, etc. etc. All the grease from frying we save but don't mix your poultry grease with the beef or pork.

Then clarify the grease when you get enuf saved up to make soap or you can render lard or tallow and use it. The best soap I think is half beef and half pork though a satisfactory soap can be made from either one alone.

Here's an easy one you may wish to start with. Get a five gallon container, crock or plastic pail. Fill it half full of water. To that add a can of lye and stir well. This will heat the water up. To this stir in 9 cups of melted grease that you've clarified and keep stirring. It will look like chicken gravy. Then add 4 or five cups of borax and stir in. It will get thicker and then add 7 cups of liquid laundry booster like wisk or something, we also add an optional 1/4 cup of bluing. Stir well and then add enough water to fill the five gallon pail. Now stir off and on every few hours over the next few days. (You don't have to get up to stir it in the middle of the night ) It will start to whiten and get like cold cream. When it gets too thick to stir, pack it in ice cream buckets or plastic containers with a tight lid. Add a cup of it to your laundry water. It also makes good dish soap or for greasy hands.

It's so easy and economical

If you prefer the old time bar soap you might try this one:


To two quarts of cold soft water add 2 cans of lye. stir well and let cool to luke warm. Take five quarts of warm (not hot) grease that has been clarified and slowly pour your lye water in. Add to this 6 T of borax that has been disolved in a cup of hot water, 2 tsp canning salt, 1/2 cup of amonia and 4 T sugar. (We've left the sugar out and it still works fine)

Stir until it gets light and thick, pour into your molds that have been lined with a wet cloth. Let stand until thick enough to cut into bars, then set to air cure for a week or two before using it. You will have to grate it or melt it to use in the wash machine, that's the advantage of the first recipe over this one.

We've used both of these for years. Just one warning, the last one should not be used for hair unless you don't mind if it lightens your hair color.
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Old 06-08-2011, 01:38 PM
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Thank you thank you thank you oldtimer!!!! It was me!!! Or at least I was one of the people here who wanted to learn how to make soap and.... I definitely remember my mom saving her cooking grease so this is the closest recipe I've ever come across to the way I "think" my mom and grandmothers made soap.
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I don't remember her clarifying the beef grease but... I'm sure she did. How exactly do I do that please? And how much is enough to save before I could give this a go?
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Oh.... you poor thing for starting this thread. I plan on asking a lot of questions and you're probably going to end up suffering from brain drain because soap making is one skill me and a personal friend have been lusting to learn. We both remember our moms saving grease to make soap.
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Old 06-08-2011, 05:27 PM
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Default How to Clarify Cooking Drippings.

No problem.

You need to save up enough til you have enough clarified grease for whatever receipt you're using.

We keep our cookin grease in a 3 pound coffee can.

To clarify your cooking grease, put a quart of water in a big pan like a jelly kettle or dutch oven and put on low heat on the stove. Scoop your cold left over cooking drippings into this pan. Stir until your grease is completely disolved. It should become kind of transparent. Once it has reached that point, shut off the fire and take a quart of cold water and stir well it into the hot grease. (Be careful not to splash and burn yourself)


Then just let the whole mess set until it cools and the grease will solidify and turn white again. Once your grease is cool and hardened, you begin to scoop the grease away little by little from the top. Your nice clean grease will be at the top and the impurities will be at the bottom. Most of the impurities will be in the water which is below the grease as the water is heavier than the fat, but you will notice as you scrape the grease away that the grease that is close to the water level will be off colored and have some little flecks in it. Stop at that point and discard that grease with the water. You only want the nice clean stuff.

We just throw the dirty grease from the bottom to the cats and toss the water down the outhouse hole. Hope this is of some help.
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Old 06-09-2011, 02:06 PM
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Gotcha. I'm thinking it's gonna take me about 3 months to get the amount of grease I'd need to make one batch of soap. I could store a pop can's worth of grease in the frig at a time until I had enough, right? Grease keeps pretty much for months in a frig, right? Correct me if I'm wrong please.
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Even though it's actually the old time bar soap I'm interested in replicating here at home, I'm definitely interested in the 1st recipe too. You mentioned this, "liquid laundry booster like wisk or something". Is that the product sold in a red container? I'm pretty sure I've seen it before but I've never bought it. What other laundry boosters could be used if you happen to know off hand?
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What type/brand of lye do you use? Where is it usually purchased?
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Forms I need time to research a little more online before I start picking your brain on that one.
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Yes... this is ALL very helpful because it parallels what I remember from when I was a kid.... down to the wet dish cloths.
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Old 06-10-2011, 12:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Equilibrium View Post
Gotcha. I'm thinking it's gonna take me about 3 months to get the amount of grease I'd need to make one batch of soap. I could store a pop can's worth of grease in the frig at a time until I had enough, right? Grease keeps pretty much for months in a frig, right? Correct me if I'm wrong please.
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Even though it's actually the old time bar soap I'm interested in replicating here at home, I'm definitely interested in the 1st recipe too. You mentioned this, "liquid laundry booster like wisk or something". Is that the product sold in a red container? I'm pretty sure I've seen it before but I've never bought it. What other laundry boosters could be used if you happen to know off hand?
--
What type/brand of lye do you use? Where is it usually purchased?


--
Forms I need time to research a little more online before I start picking your brain on that one.
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Yes... this is ALL very helpful because it parallels what I remember from when I was a kid.... down to the wet dish cloths.
Yes, grease will keep fine if kept cool. You might also go to your local locker plant and ask them for some tallow. They generally give it away and then you could take it home and render it. (I'd hire them to grind it for you first, though, that makes the butcher happy that he's making something and you'd also save yourself a big headache of grinding it yourself to render)

We use Wisk but reckon any of these liquid laundry boosters would work. We buy lye in fifty pound quantitities from a local chemical supplier in our nearest big city. We make a lot of soap for missions so that's why we buy it in bulk, but we used to just get what they have at the grocery store, a can of Lewis's Red Devil Lye.
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Old 06-10-2011, 12:31 AM
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I just went and looked and Ebay comes to the rescue again. If you're grocery store isn't cultured enough to carry lye, you can buy Red Devil Lye through Ebay.
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Old 06-11-2011, 03:26 PM
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I really hate to ask this question but.... what's a locker plant?
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My grocery store is "cultured" alrightie... so "cultured" in fact that it's loaded with processed foods. I doubt it's gonna have Red Devil Lye but.... ya never know. An interesting comment came up in another thread. sissy has been using some sorta Rooto Drain product for making her soap. I did some checking and found out that Rooto 1030 Crystals Of Household Lye Drain Opener's secondary use would be.... soap making. I read where it's 100% lye. I'm thinking which ever is cheapest is the one I'm gonna buy. They look like they're the exact same product only packaged differently.
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For a form.... could a basic 2x4 frame built to fit one of my dishtowels be used? I'm thinking with the wet dishtowel in it that I wouldn't need to make it like a flan pan that released. Does this sound ok?
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Old 06-13-2011, 12:23 AM
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As long as that drain opener is 100 percent lye, go for it.

You can just make a two by four frame. We actually just use a stout cardboard box and line it with the wet floursack dishtowel. Don't use a knobbly cloth like terry cloth.

My wife says I should add some safety precautions for you all that haven't made soap so here's her list:

1.Make soap in a well ventilated area so you don't breathe the fumes while you're mixing the lye and the water

2. Wear rubber gloves while making soap.

3. Don't use your soap until it's aged a couple of weeks to let the sopanofication process complete.

4. Make sure you mix soap in a container that is either crock or plastic. DO NOT USE ALUMINUM!!!!! Stainless steel will work as so does cast iron though it is hard on the iron.

5. Wear safety goggles.

Now I'll tell on her, she doesn't do 2 and 5 but then we've not been OSHA approved.

I'm just curious where you live that you don't have a locker plant?

Around here, most folks have gotten too lazy to butcher their own critters so they take their hog, sheep, or cow, to a locker plant. That's a butcher who does custom butchering and processing. They'll take your critter and for a price will dress and wrap it for you. There's always a certain amount of fat that is trimmed from the animals and this is waste. Even with a hog, few people want their lard anymore.

We go to our locker plant and he lets me have all the tallow and lard our want. I pay him to grind it for me, then I don't have to and it has to be ground to render. We've rendered lots of it and I even have ladies at church who've taken it home and rendered it for me, bringing five gallon buckets of fine rendered grease to church so I can haul it home.

We then make soap according to the hard soap recipe and send it through a church relief agency to grateful people in Africa and eastern Europe who don't care that it didn't come of a store shelf.
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Old 06-13-2011, 08:44 PM
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I have plenty of cardboard boxes around here and I know it works well for hypertufa so no sense building a frame out of a 2x4. Thanks for mentioning that because cardboard would be a tear away like a flan pan. I have exactly the dish towels you mentioned. The terry cloth ones don't last but the Egyptian cotton ones I got over 30 years ago did last and.... they're not terry cloth.
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I'll probably wear the gloves and the goggles until I've made a few batches. Better safe than sorry when you're doing something new.
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I live in a suburb of Chicago. Locker plant.... ha ha ha. They probably closed the last one we had for violating some ordinance.... who knows. I can't think of a single locker plant around here. Now, if I go north of where I live across the border into Wisconsin they do have this place called Hackers that processes live chickens. You pass them through the window and they pass them back to you wrapped in nice freezer paper... all for $2 a bird. It's actually a good deal. That's about as close as we get to a locker plant. I don't know where anyone would go to butcher a cow or hog. The only cows around here are Dexters and they're kept as pets or companions to Thoroughbreds... I kid you not.
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Old 06-14-2011, 03:02 AM
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If you have a supermarket like HyVee they will have beef fat they trim as they cut their own meat. Ask them for some.

We've dressed a lot of chickens but not at two bucks a piece. Wow, if I could get that kind of money, I'd stay home and dress chickens every day.

We dressed lots of them for thirty five cents and have now worked up to where we charge a buck a piece.
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Old 06-14-2011, 11:41 AM
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Other than very small Mexican grocers.... which I do like a lot, we don't have many options to the large chain grocery stores. No HyVees around here. You're not going to believe this but... they package the trimmed fat and sell it. Their market is the people like me who make suet for the birds.
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I did buy 2 lbs of the drain opener. It was 100% lye. Once I remember to do so, I'm going to call around looking for better pricing for 10 or 20 lbs. It's out there. I just need to find it.
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I was talking to my neighbor about Hacker's pricing and found out they're up to $2.50 a bird but... you still wouldn't want to live where I live. Hacker's is struggling because incredibly they don't have enough business. Too many of these folk around me get their chicken on styrofoam trays and haven't the 1st clue that somebody had to kill it. $1 a bird sounds wonderful considering you don't have to deal with the trade offs of living anywhere near where I live.
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I'll send you a photo of my cardboard box frame and the dishcloths I have and you can tell me if I'm good to go or not. After that.... it's wait it out a few months until I have enough grease.
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Old 01-04-2012, 06:36 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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Oldtimer, thank you for posting, One question, what size is the lye. I seem to remember different size cans, and I hate he recipies that say take 6.4 oz of this, and 22. 3 oz of that.
could you clalrify the amount of lye, how many oz? I want to make the first recipe. Sounds like stuff my mother used. thank you in advance.
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Old 03-02-2012, 08:13 AM
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Oldtimer, thank you for posting, One question, what size is the lye. I seem to remember different size cans, and I hate he recipies that say take 6.4 oz of this, and 22. 3 oz of that.
could you clalrify the amount of lye, how many oz? I want to make the first recipe. Sounds like stuff my mother used. thank you in advance.
sorry. I have not looked at this in ages; two cups of lye is what we use in the recipe;
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Old 03-02-2012, 10:46 PM
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I made two big batches of soap lately, using a whole can of lye for each batch. I had a lot of rendered tallow and still have enough for another batch.With that I want to make oldtimers creamy soap.

For molds I picked up a bunch of flat boxes at ALDI, the kind their cans come in. I lined them with something like Saran wrap. They worked very well. I marked the soap with a ruler and cut it with a big knife.
It does not make big bubbles, but feels very rich. The rough edges I grated up, put them in a bucket and added water to dissolve and then I added 2 cups of Borax. This was strictly playing it by ear. I use this paste for cleaning, especially the bathroom and sinks and I rub it on the super dirty spots of our laundry. I am very happy with it. And the nice thing, I am not allergic to it.
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Old 03-03-2012, 12:11 AM
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I made two big batches of soap lately, using a whole can of lye for each batch. I had a lot of rendered tallow and still have enough for another batch.With that I want to make oldtimers creamy soap.

For molds I picked up a bunch of flat boxes at ALDI, the kind their cans come in. I lined them with something like Saran wrap. They worked very well. I marked the soap with a ruler and cut it with a big knife.
It does not make big bubbles, but feels very rich. The rough edges I grated up, put them in a bucket and added water to dissolve and then I added 2 cups of Borax. This was strictly playing it by ear. I use this paste for cleaning, especially the bathroom and sinks and I rub it on the super dirty spots of our laundry. I am very happy with it. And the nice thing, I am not allergic to it.
Hey, that's the soap that kept the west clean!
You can also just put the soap in a sauce pan, heat it up, and add it to the washing machine.
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Old 03-03-2012, 11:42 PM
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you think that will do the trick oldtimer? I have a front loader, and I attract dirt. Our hand towels get filthy, too. I wonder if the guys wet their hands and wipe them on the towel. anyway, my laundry was always frustrating. I am finally happy with washing.
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Old 03-04-2012, 12:21 AM
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you think that will do the trick oldtimer? I have a front loader, and I attract dirt. Our hand towels get filthy, too. I wonder if the guys wet their hands and wipe them on the towel. anyway, my laundry was always frustrating. I am finally happy with washing.
Well, if you have one of these new front loaders that scarcely uses any water, I don't know.
Mrs. wanted one of those new fangled Neptune washers. There was a gal in town selling some that were only a year old at a garage sale as she was moving.

She refused to sell us the Neptune saying that since we lived on the farm and milked cows and had lots of dirty clothes we would never be happy with it. Her DH worked on road construction and she said she couldn't get his clothes clean with the thing. She suggested if we were going to get a new automatic to get one with an agitator.

Well, I can tell you one thing, our old wringer washer still works fine. Don't know how these new fangled machines would work with the homemade soap. I'd be worried they wouldn't do a good enough job of rinising the clothes.
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Old 06-10-2013, 05:04 PM
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I received this email from a friend of mine. I thought of everyone here when I read it! Hope you all enjoy it. I did.

"Warshing Clothes Recipe" -- imagine having a recipe for this!
Years ago, an Alabama grandmother gave the new bride the following recipe exactly as written and found in an old scrapbook with spelling errors and all.

WARSHING CLOTHES

Build fire in backyard to heat kettle of rain water. Set tubs so smoke wont blow in eyes if wind is pert. Shave one hole cake of lie soap in boilin water.

Sort things, make 3 piles -- 1 pile white, 1 pile colored, 1 pile work britches and rags.

To make starch, stir flour in cool water to smooth, then thin down with boiling water.

Take white things, rub dirty spots on board, scrub hard, and boil, then rub colored don't boil just wrench and starch.

Take things out of kettle with broom stick handle, then wrench, and starch.

Hang old rags on fence.

Spread tea towels on grass.

Pore wrench water in flower bed.

Scrub porch with hot soapy water.

Turn tubs upside down.

Go put on clean dress, smooth hair with hair combs. Brew cup of tea, sit, rock a spell, and count yore blessings.

"Warshing" Clothes Recipe


Paste this over your washer and dryer. The next time you think things are bleak, read it again, kiss that washing machine and dryer, and give thanks. The first thing each morning ,you should run and hug your washer and dryer.

For non-Southerners - wrench means rinse
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Old 06-10-2013, 07:34 PM
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Wrench. Oh when my mother's mother would say that it would drive my mother crazy. She couldn't stand to hear her mother say wrench.
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Old 06-10-2013, 11:19 PM
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How'd she feel about warshing winders?
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