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Old 08-11-2011, 06:13 PM
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Grendal Male Grendal is offline
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Default PineTar soap?

Does anyone make their own old fashioned pine tar soap? I've tried some and I kinda like it but I don't wanna spend 10 bucks on a bar of soap every time I need it.
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Old 08-12-2011, 01:12 PM
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If you end up making it, would you print out your recipe? That sounds like such a good project to make some time.
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Old 08-12-2011, 03:49 PM
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Originally Posted by momma_to_seven_chi View Post
If you end up making it, would you print out your recipe? That sounds like such a good project to make some time.
yup I would. Now that I was given some recipes.

Old Fashioned Pine Tar Soap
32.4 oz Lard (33% hard oil)
43.1 oz Soybean oil (44% loose oil)
10.8 oz coconut oil, 76 degree (12% hard oil)
10 oz Pine tar (11%) (Sap Value of .043)

1 oz Russian Fir Essential oil (optional)
2 oz Lavender or Lavandin Essential oil (optional, but recommended)

All measurements are by WEIGHT when making soap. All liquids, including water, are weighed, do not use volume measurement for any liquids.

Pine Tar generally gets treated as an additive as it has only a negligible SAP Value. Soapcalc.com does have Pine Tar listed as an ‘oil’ choice though, or you can add it to your soap calculator with the low SAP as .043 and high value of .0603.

Melt the base oils and pine tar in a soap kettle, mixing well. Save the essential oils for a later step. Set base oils and pine tar mixture aside to cool back down to room temperature. While waiting for the oils mixture to cool, prepare your lye solution:

A 6% lye discount, or ’superfat’ of excess oils in the batch, would require 11.1 oz of lye.
An 8% lye discount, or ’superfat’ of excess oils in the batch, would require 10.9 oz of lye.

Use FULL water when making Pine Tar soap. Calculate the weight of your lye multiplied by 2.7.
Example: 11.1 oz lye required to saponify your oils should use 30 oz of water to dissolve & dilute your lye (11.1 lye x 2.7 dilution factor = 29.97 oz water needed). All measurements are by weight, do not use volume.

Mix the lye into the water, mix well and set aside to cool. We use 2/3 of our water weight in the form of ice (water weighs the same frozen as it does liquid), the remaining 1/3 water weight as room temp water. This eliminates fumes and speeds cooling time. For best performance, put your cooled lye solution in the refrigerator to cool even further. Make sure the sealed container is WELL MARKED as LYE and out of reach of any children.

Add the recommended essential oils to your cooling base oils at this time. The lavender or lavandin is recommended with Pine Tar soap because these essential oils regress trace and add a few extra minutes for mixing your batch of soap. Lavender fragrance oil will not do the same thing.

You are ready to make soap when your lye solution is COLD (yes, cold as in 56 - 65 degrees), and your soap oils are room temp (65 - 75 degrees) and sloppy/sloshy with some thickening. You will be using a Low Temp Soap Process when making Pine Tar Soap. The low processing temperatures will slow the initial reaction that the pine tar has with the lye, increasing your time to mix and process your soap. Since you are using low temperatures though, it is crucial that your soap formula have at least 50% ‘loose’ base oils, such as olive, soybean, corn, etc. When combined and cooled with ‘hard oils like coconut, shortening, palm, etc you still have a mixture that is fluid at room temp.

Have your mold or molds ready and lined, waiting (you will need a 10 lb mold for this).

Working quickly, pour a steady stream of your cold lye solution into your room temp base oils mixture that you previously mixed with melted pine tar and essential oils.

Using a heavy duty spatula and a stick blender on lowest speed or short bursts, mix your lye solution thoroughly into your base oil mixture. You may notice a false trace, but it is fleeting. A second, true trace will start at about 2 minutes after mixing your lye solution into your pine tar & base oils mixture. Work quickly, just concentrate on mixing your liquids well, and then quickly turn your soap mixture into the prepared mold. Smooth the top quickly if the mixture is already thickening.

Your Pine Tar soap will go through a full gel stage, even when processing using very low temperatures.

Turn out of mold when the batch is cool to touch. Slice into logs/bars and set out to cure and harden. Pine Tar soap needs the full 3 - 5 weeks curing time to allow for the higher levels of water to evaporate, and to create a hard, long lasting bar. Below are a few oils variations that we have used over the years for Pine Tar soap with equally good results.

Vegan Pine Tar Soap
32.4 oz shortening (33% hard oil)
43.1 oz Soybean oil (44% loose oil)
10.8 oz coconut oil, 76 degree (12% hard oil)
10 oz Pine tar (11%) (Sap Value of .043)

Olive Pine Tar Soap
32.4 oz Palm (33% hard oil)
43.1 oz Olive oil (44% loose oil)
7.8 oz Palm Kernel oil, 76 degree (9% hard oil)
3 oz cocoa butter (3 %)
10 oz Pine tar (11%) (Sap Value of .043)

Be sure to adjust your lye and water measurements for the two variations above.
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Old 08-12-2011, 03:50 PM
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Here's an older recipe I was given.


Take eight gallons of soft soap, two quarts of salt, and one pound of rosin, pulverized; mix, and boil half an hour. Turn it in a tub to cool.

(soft soap below)


The ashes should be of hardwood (hickory is best), and kept dry. When put in the hopper, mix a bushel of unslacked lime with ten bushels of ashes; put in a layer of ashes; then one slight sprinkling of lime; wet each layer with water (rain water is best). A layer of straw should be put upon the bottom of the hopper before the ashes are put in. An opening in the side or bottom for the lye to drip through, and a trough or vessel under to receive the lye. When the lye is strong enough to bear up an egg, so as to show the size of a dime above the surface, it is ready for making soap; until it is, pour it back into the hopper, and let it drip through again. Add water to the ashes in such quantities as may be needed. Have the vessel very clean in which the soap is to be made. Rub the pot over with corn meal after washing it, and if it is at all discolored, rub it over with more until the vessel is perfectly clean. Melt three pounds of clean grease; add to it a gallon of weak lye, a piece of alum the size of a walnut. Let this stew until well mixed. If strong lye is put to the grease, at first it will not mix well with the grease. In an hour add three gallons of strong hot lye; boil briskly, and stir frequently; stir one way. After it has boiled several hours, cool a spoonful upon a plate; if it does not jelly, add a little water; if this causes it to jelly, then add water to the kettle. Stir quickly while the water is poured in until it ropes on the stick. As to the quantity of water required to make it jelly, judgment must be used; the quantity will depend upon circumstances. It will be well to take some in a bowl, and notice what proportion of water is used to produce this effect.

To harden it: Add a quart of salt to this quantity of soap; let it boil quick ten minutes; let it cool. Next day cut it out. This is now ready for washing purposes.
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Old 03-02-2012, 07:19 AM
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Easier method, to the soap recipe for hard laundry soap I have listed at this forum, stir in a cup and a quarter of pine tar right when the soap is starting to thicken and stir in well.
pine tar can be found at farm supply stores like TSC by the quart.
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Old 03-02-2012, 01:44 PM
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This sounds like a really stupid question, but is pine pitch that you just get from your own trees anything like pine tar?
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Old 03-02-2012, 11:18 PM
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Originally Posted by momma_to_seven_chi View Post
This sounds like a really stupid question, but is pine pitch that you just get from your own trees anything like pine tar?
Yes and no.

Pine tar is made from the pitch. If you can't find pine tar this is how to make it:

Find some good pitch mine and split it and pack a cast iron kettle with the pieces. The pieces will need to be slightly shorter than the kettle is deep so it will work.
Then place the kettle upside down over a chunk of steel with a hole in the center or a piece of rock or concrete that slopes toward the center and has a hole in it.

Take some good clay mud and seal the kettle around the edge between the steel or the rock or concrete to tighten it up. This way the pitch will have to dribble out the hole in the center and put a can underneath to catch the pine tar.

Build a fire around the kettle. The heat will drive the pitch out of the pine and kind of "toast" it making it dark and tar like. It will dribble to the hole and into your can underneath. This is your "pine tar" that you use for soap, or for putting on wounds, horses hooves, etc.. It has a diffn't consistency than regular pitch which is just sap or rosin.

A terribly old piece of wood can have pitch sap in it. My folks had an old dresser that one summer when it got hot, that 75 year old dresser dripped resin all over the floor. Go figure!

Last edited by oldtimer; 03-02-2012 at 11:18 PM. Reason: add an e to end of kettle ;)
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Old 03-03-2012, 10:36 PM
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What do you need pine tar for. Excuse the ignorant question.
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Old 01-30-2013, 03:33 PM
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What do you need pine tar for. Excuse the ignorant question.
Well I like showering with it....leaves a nice manly scent...it also does a good job removing dirt and grime. I used to use lava soap (orange soap with peices of sand/pumace/grit) in order to remove motor oil grease from knife making. I find it expensive, pine tar soap seems to work a bit better.
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Old 04-13-2013, 11:39 PM
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What do you need pine tar for. Excuse the ignorant question.
I like the smell too. I teach in a one room country school and little kids always speak their mind. "Mr. OT," they say, "You smell nice and smoky today." lol

It is actually good for dandruff and is sold to use to wash your hair in the grocery and health stores under: Grandpa's Pine Tar Soap. I think it's made in KY or TN.
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Old 04-14-2013, 02:11 AM
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Most oily dirts come off well with clean cooking oil or plain lard, then washed with plain soap and water.
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Old 04-14-2013, 10:26 AM
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Most oily dirts come off well with clean cooking oil or plain lard, then washed with plain soap and water.
Should I use lard in my hair???

Maybe Dawn dish washing soap, it cuts right through grease.

Actually, you are right. When I paint with oil paints and need to clean up afterwards, I use lard, then wash with dawn dish soap. I've also used lard in my hair to get paint out that I've gotten there from painting houses. I never by shampoo. If I don't have pine tar soap, I just wash my hair with Dawn though I have been known to use Old Roy.

That last one is a family joke. My wife commented to me one day, "Boy, I can't figure it out. Your hair's getting so shiny, what have you been washing your hair with?"

I told her just that new shampoo I'd found a bottle of on the ledge behind the tub.

My kids started laughing, "Oh, Dad, you didn't? That's Old Roy, we'd left it there when we'd given the dog a bath the last time!"

It's a lot cheaper than regular shampoo and leaves your hair full and shiny!!
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Old 04-14-2013, 03:02 PM
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"Old Roy"........ Bwahahaha... Now that is funny.....
But I will have to try it...... The hair on my head has migrated to my back and such, so a shampoo made for fur wouldn't be a bad choice....

I have seen questions about pine tar soap ask when talking about "hunters soap" and things like that....

You don't want to go into the woods smelling like Dove and Aquavelva.....

Good luck
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Old 04-14-2013, 07:07 PM
J R Adams J R Adams is offline
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I like the smell too. I teach in a one room country school and little kids always speak their mind. "Mr. OT," they say, "You smell nice and smoky today." lol

It is actually good for dandruff and is sold to use to wash your hair in the grocery and health stores under: Grandpa's Pine Tar Soap. I think it's made in KY or TN.
I can remember my dad using that 65 years ago. I think is was the same stuff.
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Old 04-15-2013, 12:47 PM
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I've used a "cleaned up" version of pine tar soap a few times.
They just added a scent and some more of another kind of soap to make it more palatable to the general public.
My oily hair needed something that worked back then.
I didn't care for the smell but it did work.

"Old Roy" That's funny.
A decade or so back a popular HORSE shampoo sold out of all of the local stores because the girls with really long hair were buying it up!
That ticked off some folks who were actually using in on their horses, but the smart folks bought it by the gallon and had some on hand till the fad blew over.
Mane and Tail
http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...ampoo-32-fl-oz
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Old 04-15-2013, 02:29 PM
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[
A decade or so back a popular HORSE shampoo sold out of all of the local stores because the girls with really long hair were buying it up!
That ticked off some folks who were actually using in on their horses, but the smart folks bought it by the gallon and had some on hand till the fad blew over.
Mane and Tail
http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...ampoo-32-fl-oz[/QUOTE]

I did not realize that was a fad. I still have a big bottle of it under the sink. Got it at TSC, I don't have a horse, it works and is cheaper.
I have to watch things with perfume, due to allergies.

Next time I go to the fleamarket I am going to keep an eye out for an old cast iron pot. Got an old disc out in the shed, that should be perfect for making pinetar. It has a hole in the center and is a bit concave.
I love recipies like that.

My mom used margerine on us. When I was a kid, we had to go barefoot, (so did every other kid, the whole classroom was barefooted). We got tar on our feet a lot of times. Did you ever put your toes on some warm tar on the road that is not liquid yet and sort of has a skin and you push, but then you push too far.
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Old 04-18-2013, 09:58 PM
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Originally Posted by bookwormom View Post
[
A decade or so back a popular HORSE shampoo sold out of all of the local stores because the girls with really long hair were buying it up!
That ticked off some folks who were actually using in on their horses, but the smart folks bought it by the gallon and had some on hand till the fad blew over.
Mane and Tail
http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...ampoo-32-fl-oz
I did not realize that was a fad. I still have a big bottle of it under the sink. Got it at TSC, I don't have a horse, it works and is cheaper.
I have to watch things with perfume, due to allergies.

Next time I go to the fleamarket I am going to keep an eye out for an old cast iron pot. Got an old disc out in the shed, that should be perfect for making pinetar. It has a hole in the center and is a bit concave.
I love recipies like that.

My mom used margerine on us. When I was a kid, we had to go barefoot, (so did every other kid, the whole classroom was barefooted). We got tar on our feet a lot of times. Did you ever put your toes on some warm tar on the road that is not liquid yet and sort of has a skin and you push, but then you push too far.[/QUOTE]

Yeah, been there, done that, and even blistered my feet big time from that hot tar.
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Old 04-19-2013, 02:32 AM
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The FAD was with the local girls who learned about it.
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Old 06-20-2013, 04:55 PM
OrionGirl Female OrionGirl is offline
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Thank you so much Grendal for the idea/instruction of using the lower temperatures for the oils and the lye solution for the pine tar soap. I've had my batch seize because I used 100F & 100F in the past. Thank you again!
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Old 06-21-2013, 10:19 AM
askew askew is offline
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A wonderful soap and my favorite since childhood. It has become far too expensive to buy and increasingly difficult to find. Thanks for the recipes and instruction. I am going to start gathering things for this. Fantastic to wash your hair with.
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