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Auto/Truck/Other Transportation If you use it to get from here to there, this is the place to talk about it and how to fix it.

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Old 07-08-2013, 09:10 PM
DaNgEr_KiTtY DaNgEr_KiTtY is offline
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Default Yellow on box truck is faded

We have a couple used Penske trucks & the cargo box on one of them is very faded. I want to put new lettering on but the old "Penske" stuff is still there. I can buff it off but that will be a huge job since I tested a small area. Does anyone know of a product that would work?
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:27 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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Originally Posted by DaNgEr_KiTtY View Post
We have a couple used Penske trucks & the cargo box on one of them is very faded. I want to put new lettering on but the old "Penske" stuff is still there. I can buff it off but that will be a huge job since I tested a small area. Does anyone know of a product that would work?
Is the lettering the type that is adhesive backed? If so ..

I've taken lettering off of my Jeep by first using a heat gun to heat up the adhesive on the back, then peeled them off. Followed by WD40 to take the remaining adhesive off.
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Old 07-09-2013, 11:06 AM
DaNgEr_KiTtY DaNgEr_KiTtY is offline
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The Penske lettering is already off. The paint where the lettering was is bright yellow & the rest is faded. The cargo box is fiberglass so its got a gelcoat on it. I was thinking about trying softscrub today.
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Old 07-09-2013, 11:02 PM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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If you intend to replace the yellow parts......
Maybe you could use John Deere yellow. I use JD green and yellow for most of my home made projects and put it on with a cheap brush. This implement paint comes from the local home supply store....

It doesn't look that good at arms length, but at a little more distance it is OK...... That kind of paint is very durable and has survived a lot of clanks and nicks.....

Good luck.....
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Old 07-10-2013, 08:30 PM
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Quietgentleman Quietgentleman is offline
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A buffer and some polishing compound will bring it around. But it's a lot of work.

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Old 07-10-2013, 10:17 PM
DaNgEr_KiTtY DaNgEr_KiTtY is offline
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A buffer and some polishing compound will bring it around. But it's a lot of work.

QGM
Yup I tried that on a small area & it worked......then I started multiplying how many days it would take me. Lookin like I will be painting it. I can get a gallon of that GMC yellow for around $100. The rubbing compound would be close to that. Thanks for the advice folks!
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Old 07-11-2013, 11:48 AM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
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A buffer is about the only way I can think of that wouldn't take forever.

An aggressive compound would make it go faster, but you might not get a good gloss without going over it again with a finer grit.

Check the paint manufacturer's recommendations if you elect to paint it. Some are going to require you to scuff the surface to get good adhesion. That's a fair amount of work in itself, although you might be able to find a scuff pad that would fit a buffer and it would go faster.

I've never worked with gelcoat. Perhaps there's a primer made for that application that would bite into it well so your paint will adhere better.

In any event, it might be worth searching some boating forums to see what those guys are doing. They work with gelcoat pretty routinely - they may have some products to deal with the fade and, if not, they'll be able to steer you to the best way to paint it. A lot of the DIY boaters are more concerned with durability than showroom finish quality, especially on the hull, since half the thing's under the water.

Another thing you could try, and I don't know if it would work, would be to go over it with either a scuff pad or fine grit sandpaper (maybe 400? - something aggressive enough to cut through the fade, but not so much it cuts through the gelcoat color). Probably want to do it wet, which would complicate using any sort of electric tool.

You'd want to just get the color even without worrying about finish. Then go over that with a decent automotive clearcoat. You'd have to experiment, but that would likely work like basecoat/clearcoat and would UV protect the gelcoat underneath.
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