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Hydro/Wind/Wood/Geothermal And other types of alternative energy

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  #1  
Old 11-17-2013, 12:03 PM
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Default Wood Heat

13 November 2013, finally, a North Florida morning cool enough to light the wood stove. 30 year new Vermont Castings Vigilant Parlor Stove, new (this year) hearth and chimney.



A handful of kindling and a couple pieces of seasoned wood, enough fire to chase the morning chill... not yet cool enough for an evening fire.
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Old 11-18-2013, 12:40 AM
MagicHands Female MagicHands is offline
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Nice stove. I like the tiles you chose too. Enjoy the warmth!

We just put in a Jotul. We're in East TN. and we expect to use it quite a bit this winter. For the last 2 weeks we prob. used it almost every day, then it warmed up over the weekend. It is supposed to get cooler again this week.
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Old 11-20-2013, 11:45 PM
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Now ya done it, I have warm weather envy. Lets see, you will go through about 5 pieces of wood a winter compared to my three cords a winter here in north east Washington state where right now the high is 20 degrees. Nice set up you have.
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Old 11-21-2013, 12:57 AM
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We have a top loading VT Castings Resolute (and I need to replace the "opener" - I see you have two of them!). Purchased in 1985, would cost us 3X what we paid to buy a new one today. Took it with us when we moved a few years ago. We ran the furnace last month to make sure it worked, been heating the house with wood since then. Soon we'll have to turn on the furnace but it won't kick in until the early morning. A wood stove beats a hot tub any day of the week.
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Old 11-21-2013, 10:41 AM
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The tile floor idea grabs me----the flooring will radiate heat--very good idea.
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Old 11-21-2013, 10:45 AM
debbie-bountiful Female debbie-bountiful is offline
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Nice stove. Beautiful fire going on in there. We heat with wood most of the winter.
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:32 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is online now
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Boy, what a nice stove for north Florida! I would think you would have to amortize that over about 50 years to make it cost effective, though.
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Old 12-03-2013, 05:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Txanne View Post
The tile floor idea grabs me----the flooring will radiate heat--very good idea.
Raised tile hearth is 4' x 6' wide... 2"x4" frame, 2 layers of 1/2" plywood, 2 layers of Hardie backer (concrete) board, then the tile. Over an inch of concrete board, grout, and tile to absorb heat



Hardie board (concrete) inside and outside, behind stove, insulated pipe through wall thimble. Insulated stainless steel chimney from thimble to top, should provide a safe chimney for the rest of my life. Even the tools (right side of stove) are over 30 years old, only hearth and chimney are new. I've lived on the same land since 1978, fully expect to complete the journey here. (For Doninalaska... less than 20 to go for that 50 year amortization.)
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Old 12-03-2013, 07:57 PM
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The tile will be a lot easier to clean, but there is not much mass to store and radiate heat.
Well, that is not so crucial for you.
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Old 12-03-2013, 08:17 PM
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The tile will be a lot easier to clean, but there is not much mass to store and radiate heat.
Well, that is not so crucial for you.
But I think it will---if its used for prolonged periods,it will store and radiated.
IMO
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Old 12-04-2013, 12:03 PM
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The ceramic tile, mortar, and concrete backer board do add mass, absorb and radiate heat. The intended purpose of the raised hearth is, provide a fire safe pad, raise the stove to a convenient loading level, distribute the weight of stove. After a couple hours stove use, the hearth feels very nice to bare feet.

The raised hearth lets me sit in a chair while starting the morning fire, convenient after four decades of "squatting" to light the morning fire. (Best spot in the house for morning coffee.) I use a stove top thermometer to monitor stove temperature... keep the doors open until 200f ~ 300f, close internal baffle at 500f for efficient secondary burn. (White handle sticking out of front leg is used to open/close baffle control on top left of stove.)

Stove provides 350 lbs. of cast iron mass, the hearth another 150 lbs... Days of radiated heat is neither needed nor desirable in North Florida. Many winter days call for a morning fire to chase the chill, then open windows by mid-afternoon.
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Old 12-04-2013, 12:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil_R View Post
The ceramic tile, mortar, and concrete backer board do add mass, absorb and radiate heat. The intended purpose of the raised hearth is, provide a fire safe pad, raise the stove to a convenient loading level, distribute the weight of stove. After a couple hours stove use, the hearth feels very nice to bare feet.

The raised hearth lets me sit in a chair while starting the morning fire, convenient after four decades of "squatting" to light the morning fire. (Best spot in the house for morning coffee.) I use a stove top thermometer to monitor stove temperature... keep the doors open until 200f ~ 300f, close internal baffle at 500f for efficient secondary burn. (White handle sticking out of front leg is used to open/close baffle control on top left of stove.)

Stove provides 350 lbs. of cast iron mass, the hearth another 150 lbs... Days of radiated heat is neither needed nor desirable in North Florida. Many winter days call for a morning fire to chase the chill, then open windows by mid-afternoon.
Anyway its beautifully done and I ENVY you !!! :
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