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  #21  
Old 01-01-2014, 05:04 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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Half of your list has died on me.
Lovage, I used to have a clump that grew six feet tall, planted some here and it hung on over the summer and did not come back next year. Lady's mantle, sweet woodruff, St. Johns wort, Borage, do not thrive here. I have seen acres of coltsfoot in Eastern Ky on a strip mine site. It likes disrupted soil, grows in gravel. It won't grow here. Not all herbs like rich soil. My lavender has thrived in a spot I just stuck it in, and it is spreading.
I would like to plant Hawthorn, but am afraid it will be a waste of good money. I planted Lamium, it is hanging in there but not spreading, same goes for Aegopodium podagraria, I do not know the common name, but it is a terribly invasive weed, but we really like the flavor and ate it every spring, so I planted it in a place where it should have been happy. It was not. Mother could not believe that it died. Not everything does well everywhere.
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  #22  
Old 01-02-2014, 04:28 AM
Dame Dame is offline
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Also corn salad (for radiation exposure) and cilantro for oral chelation. The cilantro is self seeding once it gets started. There is also mustard (self seeds) and black seed (self seeds). Cayenne peppers are easy to grow as annuals. Celery is also used medicinally as well as cucumber although I cannot remember for what. Then there is wild strawberry and horseradish (which I have a terrible time starting here). And holy basil.

All of the above are easy to grow in most places.
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  #23  
Old 01-16-2014, 09:20 AM
weedpuller Male weedpuller is offline
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Permit me to put in a plug for elderberries. I started growing them for use in winemaking and have yet to find any part of the plant that doesn't have a use. They are easy to start from seed. I picked one cluster from a roadside plant and got 72 seedlings from 72 berries. The berries and flowers are easy to harvest and make superb wine. The berries also make excellent pies and muffins. We also can quite a few quarts to have on cereal in the middle of Winter. Don't judge the flavor by tasting a raw berry. Not much there, but cooking gives them a totally different taste and smell. Birds are attracted to my garden by the ripe berries (there will be plenty for both of us) and do a great job of insect control in the rest of the garden. I noticed that the leaves and stems are totally free of insect pests so I put a couple of handfuls through the blender and strained off the liquid. I don't know if it killed the bugs on other food crops, but it sure ran them off. The effect will last through several rains. According to my herbal medicine books, elderberries will also treat a wide range of medical problems. I haven't tried that yet except to vouch for the wine's stomach-soothing properties. Did I mention that they are unaffected by frost and freeze in zone 7?
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  #24  
Old 01-16-2014, 12:25 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weedpuller View Post
Permit me to put in a plug for elderberries. I started growing them for use in winemaking and have yet to find any part of the plant that doesn't have a use. They are easy to start from seed. I picked one cluster from a roadside plant and got 72 seedlings from 72 berries. The berries and flowers are easy to harvest and make superb wine. The berries also make excellent pies and muffins. We also can quite a few quarts to have on cereal in the middle of Winter. Don't judge the flavor by tasting a raw berry. Not much there, but cooking gives them a totally different taste and smell. Birds are attracted to my garden by the ripe berries (there will be plenty for both of us) and do a great job of insect control in the rest of the garden. I noticed that the leaves and stems are totally free of insect pests so I put a couple of handfuls through the blender and strained off the liquid. I don't know if it killed the bugs on other food crops, but it sure ran them off. The effect will last through several rains. According to my herbal medicine books, elderberries will also treat a wide range of medical problems. I haven't tried that yet except to vouch for the wine's stomach-soothing properties. Did I mention that they are unaffected by frost and freeze in zone 7?
thanks, good post.
I wholeheartedly concur. Except for the taste. I always cooked them with either apples or plums to improve the taste. My grandmother thought elder to be the most important medicinal herb. DH planted some seeds, as there was not a single elder on the premisses when we bought this place.
I use the flowers mostly, for the simple reason that the berries get ripe here and there. A few clusters are ripe and the others are in all stages, and the birds are eating the ripe ones. From three bushes I got enough berries to make maybe two cups of eldersyrup. Here in Ky I see them growing thick along the railroad tracks, or used to before they got sprayed. The goats love the leaves. I am planning on spraying plants that are susceptible to virus with a tea.
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  #25  
Old 01-16-2014, 12:33 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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I don't have time to reread the whole thread, but I wonder if stinging nettle was mentioned. It is a very beneficial though unpleasant plant, very high in protein.
It can be cooked like creamed spinach, dried for tea, fermented for a garden fertilizer, and for pest control, mainly aphids. It can also be dried and crumbled and put on feed, as it is high in protein, but I said that already. I hope mine will spread more. There is a caterpillar that eats the leaves. My grandmother used stinging nettles to feed the goslings, they thrived on it. It has to be chopped, otherwise they won't eat it. I want to try it out on chicks this spring, too.
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  #26  
Old 01-16-2014, 02:46 PM
oeb oeb is offline
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Default Thanks for plugging nettle, Mom. It is good.

Stinging nettle and what we call bull nettle will grow where most every thing else fails. You can handle it without ill effect if you touch it only with the palms of your hands, including palm side of fingers. As we all know, a touch on any other part of the body is muey malo. Bull nettles make a fairly large nut that are nutricious and delicious roasted or boiled in brine. Now, if somebody would just come up with a beneficial use for Goathead and Grass Burr, maybe I'd move back to W. TX.

oeb
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  #27  
Old 01-16-2014, 05:20 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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I learned not to go against the grain, so to speak. the stingers are all in one direction.
BTW, the poison is beneficial for rheumatoid conditions. Similar to bee stings.
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  #28  
Old 01-20-2014, 07:54 PM
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CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
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OEB - my soil in Arkansas was terrible. Good thing, many herbs really like poor soil and do fine in it. I'm not telling how many plants I killed though! Stuff that grows for me just has to be hardy.

Miracle berry is a fad plant you can find on the internet. (not Goji, - although I do have a sister that planted a few seeds and now has a patch that is out of control!) - Miracle berry has berries that change the chemistry in your mouth for a couple of hours. You can eat a lemon like an orange - sours taste super sweet, and then the effects wear off and you go back to normal. In 10 years they'll probably find out it causes you to grow another ear or arm or something - but since mine is years away from blooming and fruiting, maybe they'll discover what's wrong with it before I actually try one!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_fruit
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  #29  
Old 08-05-2014, 03:56 AM
AlaskanGuy Male AlaskanGuy is offline
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I say, go for the weeds... He he

plantain and yarrow will do well, as well as some Pineapple weed... And the 3 of them combined make a pretty decent salve when combined in an infusion, then mixed with some willow bark, beeswax, and a few drops of vitamin E.... Works great on things like cuts, burns, and such, as yarrow is an astringent, and helps stop bleeding... Also works wonders on bug bites, and preventing them in the first place.....

Lots of stuff will grow well in your zone, but once you get the three above started, they will grow no matter what ya do...lol

AlaskanGuy

Last edited by AlaskanGuy; 08-05-2014 at 04:16 AM.
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  #30  
Old 08-12-2014, 03:18 AM
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LoiDreams Female LoiDreams is offline
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There is a Web Site called Foraging Texas. It has some great plants some medicinal and each plant has a map that will let you know if it grows in your area. That's how I learned about Heals All Prunella Vulgaris. Feverfew should grow in Indiana it grew in Illinois when I lived there. Prickly Ash is good for toothaches and the like and should grow in your area. You will want to grow it somewhere you won't brush against it though It is named Prickly for a reason. Poppy is good you'll want the Papaver Somniferum species for the juice but only if you are willing to study up on its uses. Not really a safe plant otherwise another plant mentioned Foxglove isn't really safe without knowledge it can give you a heart attack. Horsetail is supposed to have medicinal properties also. Can't remember what they are at the moment. Of course Black cherry the inner bark is an expectorant but there are safer expectorants out there.
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  #31  
Old 08-13-2014, 03:25 PM
annabella1 annabella1 is offline
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I looked at the foraging Texas site for more information on "prickly ash" I was impressed by this listing:
Other uses: Hit people with spiny club made from trunk
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