BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum

Posting requires Registration and the use of Cookies-enabled browser

  #1  
Old 08-04-2014, 03:41 PM
CarolAnn's Avatar
CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 4,888
Default Knot your thread

OK - who else does the off-hand knot? My grandpa showed me this when I was about 7, when he was teaching me how to embroider!

Hold the threaded needle in your right hand (or favored hand.)
With the left (or off-hand) - wrap a loop around your index finger, leaving a short tail. With your index finger and thumb, you roll the loop to make it twisty. Then you pinch down with the finger next to your index finger - actually it's the fingernail on the thread, against the thumb. As you pull the thread with your right hand, it makes a knot in the end of the thread.

This works with a single or double thread. It's a slip knot, so you can pull the short end and remove it if you need to.

I'm just amazed at the young folks I work with who think this is some kind of magic! (Of course, they don't sew on buttons, either!)
__________________
"Someday" is not a day of the week...but if it were, it sure would be a busy day!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-04-2014, 05:51 PM
Txanne's Avatar
Txanne Female Txanne is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: SE Texas
Posts: 14,211
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolAnn View Post
OK - who else does the off-hand knot? My grandpa showed me this when I was about 7, when he was teaching me how to embroider!

Hold the threaded needle in your right hand (or favored hand.)
With the left (or off-hand) - wrap a loop around your index finger, leaving a short tail. With your index finger and thumb, you roll the loop to make it twisty. Then you pinch down with the finger next to your index finger - actually it's the fingernail on the thread, against the thumb. As you pull the thread with your right hand, it makes a knot in the end of the thread.

This works with a single or double thread. It's a slip knot, so you can pull the short end and remove it if you need to.

I'm just amazed at the young folks I work with who think this is some kind of magic! (Of course, they don't sew on buttons, either!)
LOl I do that--Great Grand Mother taught me that one.
My Great Grand Father used it making fish nets.
I didnt know there was any other way---Glad to know someone else does it .
__________________
TROUBLE RIDES A FAST HORSE
CASUS BELLI
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-04-2014, 06:06 PM
CarolAnn's Avatar
CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 4,888
Default

Relief! Someone else does this also!!

I was getting a needle ready for one of our young guys who had ripped his pants - and when he saw me knot the thread, he said, "Wait, WAIT! How'd you do that?" Oh, brother. Another way to make me feel like a dinosaur! He DID sew up his own britches, though - I didn't ask exactly where the rip was, either!!
__________________
"Someday" is not a day of the week...but if it were, it sure would be a busy day!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-05-2014, 01:08 AM
Txanne's Avatar
Txanne Female Txanne is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: SE Texas
Posts: 14,211
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolAnn View Post
Relief! Someone else does this also!!

I was getting a needle ready for one of our young guys who had ripped his pants - and when he saw me knot the thread, he said, "Wait, WAIT! How'd you do that?" Oh, brother. Another way to make me feel like a dinosaur! He DID sew up his own britches, though - I didn't ask exactly where the rip was, either!!
I have never known any other way---and one thing though,I have never learned to use a thimble---: My Mother tried to get me to use one--I can knot the thread but not manage a thimble---its like having a 6th finger or something.
__________________
TROUBLE RIDES A FAST HORSE
CASUS BELLI
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-06-2014, 01:41 AM
Tim Horton's Avatar
Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Deep in the BC Bush
Posts: 5,841
Default

Interesting CarolAnn.... I would like to see how that is done....
Sounds kind of like a surgeons one handed knot... My buddy Mike in machinist tec college (about 30 years ago) could do that... But then he was a psychologist, he also had other medical degrees, his dad was a surgeon, and other family members in health care...

I can put on buttons... And a very few other needle work repairs... Not pretty, but functional...

Talent is a gift... No matte what it is...

Enjoy...
__________________
Always fresh.
Keep your stick on the ice. Red Green
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-08-2014, 08:23 AM
SarahM Female SarahM is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Galloway, Scotland
Posts: 18
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Txanne View Post
I have never known any other way---and one thing though,I have never learned to use a thimble---: My Mother tried to get me to use one--I can knot the thread but not manage a thimble---its like having a 6th finger or something.
I was taught at textile college how to use a thimble correctly, as professional tailors do, and I know find it very hard to sew anything, even a button, without one. I'm amassing quite a collection too. Another thing they taught there was a knot in the thread similar to the way described above.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-08-2014, 11:56 AM
Txanne's Avatar
Txanne Female Txanne is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: SE Texas
Posts: 14,211
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahM View Post
I was taught at textile college how to use a thimble correctly, as professional tailors do, and I know find it very hard to sew anything, even a button, without one. I'm amassing quite a collection too. Another thing they taught there was a knot in the thread similar to the way described above.
My Mother had a small collection.
I have her most favorite one--worn almost slick from years of use.
She was a seamtress of rare quality.
She could look at a dress in a store window--go home and cut a pattern out of newspaper.
Having grown up during the depression---

Are you a Tailor?
Do you have your own shop?
How very interesting.
__________________
TROUBLE RIDES A FAST HORSE
CASUS BELLI
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-08-2014, 02:32 PM
Mesquite_Bean's Avatar
Mesquite_Bean Mesquite_Bean is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Zone 8
Posts: 267
Default

That's how I do my knots too.
Learned in Girls Scouts some 30 years ago.
__________________
~Bean
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-09-2014, 10:46 PM
Dayzee's Avatar
Dayzee Dayzee is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Arizona High Desert
Posts: 397
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolAnn View Post
OK - who else does the off-hand knot? My grandpa showed me this when I was about 7, when he was teaching me how to embroider!

Hold the threaded needle in your right hand (or favored hand.)
With the left (or off-hand) - wrap a loop around your index finger, leaving a short tail. With your index finger and thumb, you roll the loop to make it twisty. Then you pinch down with the finger next to your index finger - actually it's the fingernail on the thread, against the thumb. As you pull the thread with your right hand, it makes a knot in the end of the thread.

This works with a single or double thread. It's a slip knot, so you can pull the short end and remove it if you need to.

I'm just amazed at the young folks I work with who think this is some kind of magic! (Of course, they don't sew on buttons, either!)

Hmmm! After giving this procedure quite a bit of thought, I don't know whether I do it this way or not. I think I tie knots in the end of a thread without ever thinking about it. My Gram (born in 1895) taught me to sew, knit, and crochet. Now I will never put a knot in the end of a thread ever again without thinking about this! Gee, thanks!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-12-2014, 07:58 PM
doc doc is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: central WI--finally!
Posts: 1,486
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Txanne View Post
...She could look at a dress in a store window--go home and cut a pattern out of newspaper.
.
My Ma was like that too. Once when I was in hi school, I spilled something at breakfast on my last clean shirt. She whipped a new one up on her sewing machine in about 20 minutes because it would have taken more than an hour to wash and dry the old one.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 08-12-2014, 08:10 PM
Txanne's Avatar
Txanne Female Txanne is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: SE Texas
Posts: 14,211
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by doc View Post
My Ma was like that too. Once when I was in hi school, I spilled something at breakfast on my last clean shirt. She whipped a new one up on her sewing machine in about 20 minutes because it would have taken more than an hour to wash and dry the old one.
My Mother made school clothes for all 6 of us in just a few weeks on an old treadle machine.
It takes Mothers days of shopping to buy inferior clothes and spent 100's if not $1000.00's.

Its a lost art---we need to keep these skills alive.
And BTW way Doc--I bet you could teach of some knots?:
__________________
TROUBLE RIDES A FAST HORSE
CASUS BELLI
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08-14-2014, 12:14 AM
doc doc is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: central WI--finally!
Posts: 1,486
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Txanne View Post
My Mother made school clothes for all 6 of us in just a few weeks on an old treadle machine.
It takes Mothers days of shopping to buy inferior clothes and spent 100's if not $1000.00's.

Its a lost art---we need to keep these skills alive.
And BTW way Doc--I bet you could teach of some knots?:
No. There's a reason I'm not a surgeon. I'm too clumsy. I'd wind up sewing my own thumb to some poor guy's gall bladder. My home repairs look like Oliver Wendel Douglas' repair of his front bannister on Green Acres.

When my wife has a repair job for me, she rates the difficulty in how many "M-F ers" it should take me to get it done.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 08-14-2014, 12:24 AM
Txanne's Avatar
Txanne Female Txanne is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: SE Texas
Posts: 14,211
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by doc View Post
No. There's a reason I'm not a surgeon. I'm too clumsy. I'd wind up sewing my own thumb to some poor guy's gall bladder. My home repairs look like Oliver Wendel Douglas' repair of his front bannister on Green Acres.

When my wife has a repair job for me, she rates the difficulty in how many "M-F ers" it should take me to get it done.
Yeah but the world needs you GP's---smart wife.
Does she have a penalty jar for the(M F-ers) : :
__________________
TROUBLE RIDES A FAST HORSE
CASUS BELLI
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -2. The time now is 08:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1996 to Present. Backwoods Home Magazine, Inc.