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Old 05-20-2010, 10:18 PM
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Question Any spinners here?

I have been spinning for about 10 yrs now. I was wondering if there were any spinners. I also like to dye wool and yarn. I'm thinking about planting a dye garden.
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Old 05-20-2010, 11:58 PM
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I'm a spinner. Don't raise the little woolies, though. Buy my roving from Pacific Wool & Fiber, online. What do you like to spin? What kind of wheel do you have?
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Old 05-21-2010, 09:56 AM
Pokeberry Mary Pokeberry Mary is offline
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Default Similar Interest

I have an interest in dying wool with natural dyes myself. I don't spin or raise sheep however--but I create small animals/dolls out of wool and I would like to take it up a notch and use wool dyed with natural dyes. I've been thinking about the plants in my woods and garden--Poke salet plant for one--it has very dark berries in late summer/fall. I've always enjoyed the connection between art and nature. In my travels about the neighborhood I noticed a neighbor has sheep and was thinking of stopping buy to see if she was selling any wool or meat.

I don't think I have the stamina to keep a pasture going for sheep--but I do think I would enjoy gathering plant material and making dyes.

So anyhow that's where I'm at with it.
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Old 05-21-2010, 07:00 PM
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I have two wheels: a Lendrum Double treadle and a Cascade Shaker Chair wheel. I love them both. I used to raise sheep but not any more. I have enough wool under the house to keep me spinning awhile though. I get the case of feeling guilty whenever I lust after some different fibers to spin! But I belong to a guild and we have stash swaps so I get some free-bees there.
As far as using poke berries to dye with, don't waste your time. Most berries will oxidize and turn out a very dull tan or brown. For natural color of red, try madder. For a very easy starter dye bath, I gathered goldernrod flowers in the summer and stuffed a pot as full as I could and covered it with water and cooked the daylights out of it. Strain the plant parts out and dye your yarn, that has been mordanted with alum, to get a beautiful yellow.
I have the book, "A Dyer's Garden" by Rita Buchanan and I think I may grow some of the plants she has used in there to get some nice colors.
Most of my yarn is used for socks, hats, mittens, etc that I gift to family members. It helps that I have quite a few of them!

Patty

Last edited by PattyW; 05-21-2010 at 07:26 PM.
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  #5  
Old 05-21-2010, 08:06 PM
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Default Love to spin and dye

I spent four years studying fiber arts at the Threefold community fiber arts studio in Chestnut Ridge New York. It was so much fun!

It's fun dying with purchased materials, but try using gathered materials to conduct dying experiments. Keep a record and create your own book.

Pam
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Old 05-21-2010, 08:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pamsabear View Post
I spent four years studying fiber arts at the Threefold community fiber arts studio in Chestnut Ridge New York. It was so much fun!

It's fun dying with purchased materials, but try using gathered materials to conduct dying experiments. Keep a record and create your own book.

Pam

I agree. Keep a notebook. I have a binder with samples of all the mushroom colors I've done and natural colors from a day at a guild member's house. I forgot to keep some goldenrod I did but I will try some this year. Keep notes, you never know when you may want to repeat the color.
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Old 05-21-2010, 09:58 PM
cwatson cwatson is offline
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I learned how to spin this past winter. I have a Majacraft Rose. I really like it. I have only spun wool so far but I have lots of mohair that I am working on processing. I have only attempted to dye one time and yep I got the color you were talking about dusty kinda tan rose color. What an experience. I think I may look into that book you mentioned on the dying garden. My friend has angora goats so I get lots of mohair and another friend has llamas we barter. She gives me all the llama fiber I want I spin it and give her half back to sell to keep the Llama rescue going. It's a win/win. I am spinning some Jacob/romney right currently.

Does any one use a drop spindle? My friend taught me that too.
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Old 05-22-2010, 05:35 PM
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I have a drop spindle but I don't use it anymore. I used it to do demos for school groups but since my girls are adults now, I don't do the 4H demos anymore. I spin for speed and output now! I was going to give it to my sister. She teaches elementary school and shows the kids things like this.
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Old 05-27-2010, 11:44 PM
cwatson cwatson is offline
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Yeah the kids are pretty fascinated by the drop spindle. I have used it with home schoolers a couple of times.

I don't spin for speed yet. I am still spinning to get consistency

My friend called me today and said she had 8 large bags of Llama ready for me to pick up whenever I want. I am still up to my elbows in mohair and targhee but I just have to give the llama a try.
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Old 05-28-2010, 11:35 AM
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The woman who taught me how to spin, began with a drop spindle so I could visualize what was happening. Something so cleanly elegant about being able to pick it up and carry it around with you!

Now I have two wheels, both by Ashford: a traditional upright, and the portable Joy wheel. The Joy is my favorite, both for ease of use and for portability. I knit my spun yarn into garments--sweaters and vests, mostly--and because the finished garment is merely the excuse to be spinning, you can guess that I've a closet full!

Out here in our neighboring state of Oregon, someone crossed pygmy goats with angora goats, calling the resulting critter a Pygora. They're wee little fellows that produce fleeces in a spectrum of natural colors and with texture ranging from their mohair antecedents to the cashmere-like down on the pygmy. Affectionate critters, very pet-like. But the roving they produce is the real attraction. Try some if you ever get a chance.
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Old 05-29-2010, 01:31 AM
cwatson cwatson is offline
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It's funny you should mention the Pygora goats because I was telling DH that we should get a couple. We only have an acre and we have two Nigerian Dwarf milk goats but I think we still have room for two pygoras too.
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Old 05-29-2010, 12:05 PM
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Try this link. http://www.hmrpygoras.com/
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Old 06-03-2010, 10:13 AM
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Thanks castiron. Aren't they just the cutest?

Yesterday I scoured my first llama wool. As soon as I get this Jacob off the spinning wheel I will test spinning this stuff. I got it free, I just spin it and give half back to the girl that has the llama rescue. I wish I had 10 friends that would help spin it so they could get some money into the rescue. They sell they half that is given back to them. There are two other women that do this but they have LOTS of wool just waiting to be spun. I still have 40 pounds of mohair waiting to be processed. What I need is more time. Isn't that what we all say?
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Old 02-17-2014, 12:42 PM
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Default Another spinner here...

I'm way late to this thread, but I am also a spinner. I've been spinning consistently for about 2 years and have an Ashford Traveller wheel. I'm still dying with Kool-Aid and food colors.

Drop spindles are cool! The wheel may be fast, but you can take a spindle anywhere
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Old 02-18-2014, 04:21 AM
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Ruby, thanks for pulling this up. I spin too. I have a Kromski Minstrel and have the additional jumbo flyer. Having trouble with baby camel at the moment, tends to "get away from me" if you will. Just have to try and slow myself down I guess. LOL
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Old 02-18-2014, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CLee View Post
Ruby, thanks for pulling this up. I spin too. I have a Kromski Minstrel and have the additional jumbo flyer. Having trouble with baby camel at the moment, tends to "get away from me" if you will. Just have to try and slow myself down I guess. LOL
Camel! That sounds pretty advanced to one who is still trying to figure out sheep I can get yarn out of it, but consistency is still a problem. A few months ago I tried spinning purchased roving on the wheel and had to slow way way down! Apparently with combed fibers you can't just let 'er rip. I tightened the tension on everything and treadled as slowly as possible. Did not like that, but at least I learned from it.

Good luck with the camel. Is it like alpaca?
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Old 02-26-2014, 01:17 AM
Sugarfoot Sugarfoot is offline
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Default Dye Garden

I am not a spinner although i find it intriguing, but i have found boiled beets to make a beautiful & long lasting dye. At least it never comes out of my cup towels!
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Old 09-13-2014, 10:25 PM
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I have never used a spinning wheel before, but I sure do plan to in the future, as we acquired a small flock of Shetland sheep this year. We'll be shearing them for the first time next spring, and then I'll try spinning. I'll have white, brown, and black fleece.

If anyone has a recommendation for the best kind of spinning wheel for a beginner, do tell.
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Old 09-16-2014, 01:14 PM
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Default Ashford Traveller

My wheel is an Ashford Traveller that I made from a kit back in the 1970s. I learned to spin on it, then let it sit for a number of years. When I recently went back to spinning, it still did everything I required.

Of course, I am self-taught, so I don't consider myself an expert at all. Conventional wisdom says to try out a number of wheels to see what suits you best. If there are fiber fairs in your area, a visit to them might be a good idea. Usually there is someone selling wheels and often there are classes.

Good luck and happy hunting!
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