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Hydro/Wind/Wood/Geothermal And other types of alternative energy

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  #21  
Old 09-22-2014, 11:55 PM
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When I lived in Arkansas back in the 70s I sold quite a bit of firewood over the winter. Everyone wanted Red Oak which there was plenty of, but they also all wanted green wood. Give somebody dead wood and they'd complain.

One winter we pruned back some big standard apple trees so there was quite a bit of wood there. Green apple was about as good as oak if not better, and sure smelled good.



Actually Annie cottonwood can give you a hot fire. The reason is because it burns fast, which gives a hotter fire. Doesn't give you a decent bed of coals, but I suspect that's because it burns fast.

I like the fact it lights easily so it's easy to get a fire going. But I sure wish I had more oak for overnight wood so I had a decent bed of coals in the morning if I don't get up overnight to throw another log on the fire.
Hunter--I would freeze to death with cottonwood----mostly here it is shipped overseas to make baskets.
May be difference in that particular tree and where it grows.
Of course I needed hot burning wood--half green red oak kept me warm for 10 years.
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Old 09-22-2014, 11:58 PM
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A taylor water stove operates based on forced air into fire box.
When water is at right temp the fan doesn't run. And flame die down to nothing but hot coals waiting for fan to blow air in when way temp goes down.

Season wood burns to quickly. Green hickory last longer than. Any wood I have found. I load it once in morning and once in evening
Thanks MoF--never have seen one of those---learn something new everyday.

Hickory is a high priced wood here---cheap is $280.00 a cord.
Famous BBQ wood.
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Old 09-23-2014, 09:56 AM
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This is what they look like Annie:



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Old 09-23-2014, 10:19 AM
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Thanks Coaltrain.

I assume they are brick lined.
Is the water heated in the unit or inside the home.
You could put some good size butts in the unit.
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Old 09-23-2014, 10:26 AM
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Yeah it is. It is about. 25 yards from the house.
How often do you have to throw some wood in?

I knew a guy here that had an outside woodburner. He said the only thing he hated was going out just before bed time to throw some wood in. He said you'd almost fall asleep in the recliner and decide to go to bed, but first you had to step out in 0 degree weather to throw on some wood, and that would wake you right up.

I believe he said he threw wood in 3 times a day. When he left for work in the morning, when he got home from work, and before he went to bed.
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Old 09-23-2014, 10:42 AM
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Hunter--I would freeze to death with cottonwood----mostly here it is shipped overseas to make baskets.
Here cottonwood is mainly used to build pallets, never heard of it used to make baskets. Wonder if we're talking about two different types of tree, with different names for different parts of the country. Cottonwood is terriblely grainy and sometimes can be a real pain to split. You stand there trying to pull two pieces apart but they're held together by some strands of wood.

My previous house, the one next door that I sold to my daughter and son in law, I heated with cottonwood. A guy gave me this old stove that had a squirrel cage blower under it. I set it in the basement and just ran the blower pipe to the open staircase that went upstairs. I thought it would blow hot air towards the north end of the house which would help make that warmer. But in the end it heated the whole house.

That house was 1800 sq ft with a full basement under it, and that little stove heated that whole thing. Even in our cold Nebraska winters, below freezing during the day and below 0 at night, if I ran the stove all day it would be 80 in the house when I went to bed. But because the stove wasn't great and I was using cottonwood, the stove would use up the wood overnight and come morning it would be about 65 in the house. I just couldn't damper down the stove enough to make the wood last longer.
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Old 09-23-2014, 10:50 AM
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Here cottonwood is mainly used to build pallets, never heard of it used to make baskets. Wonder if we're talking about two different types of tree, with different names for different parts of the country. Cottonwood is terriblely grainy and sometimes can be a real pain to split. You stand there trying to pull two pieces apart but they're held together by some strands of wood.

My previous house, the one next door that I sold to my daughter and son in law, I heated with cottonwood. A guy gave me this old stove that had a squirrel cage blower under it. I set it in the basement and just ran the blower pipe to the open staircase that went upstairs. I thought it would blow hot air towards the north end of the house which would help make that warmer. But in the end it heated the whole house.

That house was 1800 sq ft with a full basement under it, and that little stove heated that whole thing. Even in our cold Nebraska winters, below freezing during the day and below 0 at night, if I ran the stove all day it would be 80 in the house when I went to bed. But because the stove wasn't great and I was using cottonwood, the stove would use up the wood overnight and come morning it would be about 65 in the house. I just couldn't damper down the stove enough to make the wood last longer.
Could be Hunter---Cottonwood here loves the more swampy places---and red elm is my especial hated tree---now it fits your description.
Miserable crap wood but after is dries it burns well.
It splits better at about half dried--we always left it until last.
Pine is used to make pallets here and btw there is a logging operation in every small town.

My old stove had the damper problem--it would smoke me out .
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Old 09-23-2014, 11:05 AM
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How often do you have to throw some wood in?

I knew a guy here that had an outside woodburner. He said the only thing he hated was going out just before bed time to throw some wood in. He said you'd almost fall asleep in the recliner and decide to go to bed, but first you had to step out in 0 degree weather to throw on some wood, and that would wake you right up.

I believe he said he threw wood in 3 times a day. When he left for work in the morning, when he got home from work, and before he went to bed.
I feed it twice a day -morning and evening. I don't mind and don't have to worry about lugging wood into house or taking ashes out.
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Old 09-23-2014, 11:27 AM
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Could be Hunter---Cottonwood here loves the more swampy places---and red elm is my especial hated tree---now it fits your description.
Miserable crap wood but after is dries it burns well.
It splits better at about half dried--we always left it until last.
I'm cutting my wood in a big bend in the river bottom so it's all low flat sandy ground. Nothing but cottonwood, and some elm, but not the red elm. The bottom where I cut has so much cottonwood, come early summer it sometimes looks like it's snowed for all the cottonwood seed on the ground. Plugs up the window screens and air conditioning unit at the house.

I used to get red elm at another place up off the river bottom, but we don't have a lot of that either. No one could ever say red elm was straight grained, and back then I used a maul instead of a splitter. But the cottonwood seems to be different. Not only is it grainy like red elm, the grains hold together and won't let go. Like red elm once it gets good and dry it does split easier.

The thing about cottonwood that is different is it seems to hold water longer. We cut trees that are not only dead but the bark has fallen off. If you picked a dead cottonwood that still has bark on it, when you split it water will still come out. I always joke that is looks like I'm cutting up telephone poles. The trees I pick have no bark, all the small branches have fallen off. So basically I just have a truck 40 or 50 feet long with nothing to take off. It's the only advantage to using cottonwood. You start at one end and just keep cutting like you were cutting up a telephone pole. Sure makes cutting a tree easy. Yesterday afternoon I cut down a tree I'd spotted earlier. I cut it down, cut it up, loaded it in the pickup, and was out of the woods in just over 30 minutes. Of course part of that speed may have been because the mosquitoes were terrible and I'd forgotten the bug spray at home.
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  #30  
Old 09-23-2014, 11:48 AM
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Thanks Coaltrain.

I assume they are brick lined.
Is the water heated in the unit or inside the home.
You could put some good size butts in the unit.
Here's a pic of how they work. There is a water jacket around the fire in the boiler. The heater water is then circulated with a small pump to the house. In the house you have a choice of how to distribute the heat with the hot water like it shows. then the cooled water goes back to the boiler.

These boilers will also have an automatic draft - it will open or close the draft as needed so the boiler maintains the preset temperature.

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  #31  
Old 09-23-2014, 01:58 PM
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Mine has 8 tubes downward angled from the firebox ( a 30"x 30"x 30")7 thru the tank. It has a circulation pump on the stove itself that comes on when the blower rekindles the fire. It pumps 170 degree water to a tank ( actually a hot water tank)in the house. In the house supply from the tank goes thru four circulation pumps to different zones (all in floor) . These are controlled by thermostats in the zones . Our house also has heat pump/ a that I keep set at 50 degrees as backup to water stove.


We live on dead end road with only three house so if there is a power failure we are pretty far down list of priorities for restoration. So.. We have a 20 KW no break generator that runs on propane out of two 500 gallon tanks . We installed generator after a major ice storm at our previous house. I was still working out of town then and wife was without power for 8 days in below freezing weather. No going there again .
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Last edited by MissouriFree; 09-23-2014 at 06:32 PM.
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  #32  
Old 09-23-2014, 05:56 PM
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Mine has 8 tubes downward angled from the firebox ( a 30"x 30"x 30")7 thru the tank. It has a circulation pump on the stove itself that comes on when the blower rekindles the fire. It pumps 170 degree water to a tank ( actually a hot water tank)in the house. In the house the supply from the tank goes thru four circulation pumps to different zones (all in floor) . These are controlled by thermostats in the zones . Our house also has heat pump/ a that I keep set at 50 degrees as backup to water stove.


We live on dead end road with only three house so if there is a power failure we are pretty far down list of priorities for restoration. So.. We have a 20 KW no break generator that runs on propane out of two 500 gallon tanks . We installed generator after a major ice storm at our previous house. I was still working out of town then and wife was without power for 8 days in below freezing weather. No going there again .
Thanks guys(Coaltrain and MoF)
Interesting concept.

MoF--I understand the wife in freezing weather and no heat----but mine is in reverse,after
Hurricane Rita----I was without electric for weeks---heat indexs at an average of 112-116 degrees----if not for a small generator that ran a fan at nite I wouldnt have made it--the horrible heat and stress.

Too bad we cant figure out how to work that in reverse----making it cool.:

I imagine they're expensive--$10,000 or better?
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  #33  
Old 09-23-2014, 06:30 PM
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Thanks guys(Coaltrain and MoF)
Interesting concept.

MoF--I understand the wife in freezing weather and no heat----but mine is in reverse,after
Hurricane Rita----I was without electric for weeks---heat indexs at an average of 112-116 degrees----if not for a small generator that ran a fan at nite I wouldnt have made it--the horrible heat and stress.

Too bad we cant figure out how to work that in reverse----making it cool.:

I imagine they're expensive--$10,000 or better?
Mine came with the house but looking it up
It is 165,000 btu and cost 7500 ( today's price)
The generator install was 5100. Lots of peace of mind while I was away. We had it move to this house.
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Old 09-24-2014, 07:43 PM
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Some of the old fashioned cook stoves had a small water container that would heat water.
I can only imagine if the lady of the house had one of these back in the day .

I have seen these wood heaters advertised but did nt understand how they work.

Now my question--what is they were cistern or well fed?
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Old 09-24-2014, 08:13 PM
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We had one of those water heaters on the back of our wood fired cook stove. Had it piped into the gravity feed water system in the house where you could actually turn on the hot water faucet and get some hot water (off grid). Wasn't enough to take a whole shower but nice to have.
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