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  #1  
Old 10-12-2014, 12:30 AM
caters Female caters is offline
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Default Preparation for future pregnancy

I started knitting at 12 years old and once I got my purling down my learning speed for knitting has accelerated to where once I watch a video about it I never forget how to do it.

I figured this:

If I start knitting baby stuff once the pregnancy test turns positive I will be very physically and emotionally stressed to get things done before birth and probably won't because of hunger, tiredness, nausea, frequent urination, and doctor's appointments.

If I didn't knit anything than I would have to buy everything that my children will wear and play with which would make me, even if I am rich, more likely to go bankrupt.

If I start at 12-13 years than I won't have to buy nearly as much stuff during and after pregnancy. I also won't be as emotionally and physically stressed.


Since I don't know what the gender of my first child and proceeding children will be I will knit for every pattern I come across one with female colors(Purples, Pinks, Some reds and oranges) and one with male colors(Blues, Greens, Some reds and oranges).

Yellow and Neutral colors I consider to be unisex.

I will also knit all the sizes for the pattern from the smallest size up so that I once again won't have to buy as much stuff no matter the age.

I will start with Worsted Weight yarn since that is what I have an abundance of.

I take care of my dolls as if they are real children. Sometimes I go as far as putting the doll in between my skin and my shirt for a long time to pretend to be pregnant. When that long time is over I start gently pulling the doll out using my arms to pretend to be giving birth. I then put the doll on my chest and pretend to breastfeed.

By doing this pretend breastfeeding and stuff I am teaching myself how to take care of a real baby without having to wake up every 2 hours or take a childcare class.

Somebody on a different site said that I might be over-preparing.

I think when it comes to something like children that you can be under-prepared but not over-prepared.

Last edited by caters; 10-12-2014 at 12:39 AM.
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  #2  
Old 10-12-2014, 02:05 AM
susang Female susang is offline
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Not sure what you are asking but I'll give it a try.

I knit and sew and found it is not always cheaper to make it. I did make my girls underwear because I enjoyed sewing and making them matching camisole and underwear, not cheaper at all.
I make socks because I like to knit them, but I can buy 10 pair for what I pay for some of my sock yarn.
Generic colors ehh.
I would say knit what you like but not overboard, buy the best clothes you can and go to kid exchange stores. If you by decent clothes keep them up well you can trade them in and get credit to buy other clothes.
You are planning on getting married and having kids in 12-13 years or your married and trying to get pregnant, not clear on that.
As far as the dolls my great granddaughters pretended being pregnant when they saw Mommy pregnant and nursed their babies, but they were respectively 2 or 3 years old.
As far as practicing being pregnant and having a baby. Drink about 10 glasses of water put a large heavy ball (20#) under your shirt over your bladder, then try to go to the store or take a short ride. If you are practicing having a baby especially number one???? Some people can have natural birth and some can't but it is hard to imagine the pain and it's different for everyone.
Good luck with knitting.
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  #3  
Old 10-12-2014, 03:45 AM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caters View Post

I take care of my dolls as if they are real children. Sometimes I go as far as putting the doll in between my skin and my shirt for a long time to pretend to be pregnant. When that long time is over I start gently pulling the doll out using my arms to pretend to be giving birth. I then put the doll on my chest and pretend to breastfeed.

By doing this pretend breastfeeding and stuff I am teaching myself how to take care of a real baby without having to wake up every 2 hours or take a childcare class.

Somebody on a different site said that I might be over-preparing.

I think when it comes to something like children that you can be under-prepared but not over-prepared.


I am not trying to be cruel but you have serious mental issues that you really should see a doctor about. And I think "Somebody on a different site" was being kind and using restraint with what they said.

If you think you can learn how to take care of much less give birth to a baby by playing with dolls you are in for a real surprise. Unless you get some help please do not even consider having a child. It will not go well for the child.
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  #4  
Old 10-12-2014, 04:00 AM
caters Female caters is offline
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Later in my life I am planning to get married and become pregnant. I have never been married or pregnant before.

Also it is often cheaper to make it than it is to buy it. One of those cases is knitting, especially nowadays where you can find large lots of yarn at an auction or on a website like ebay.
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  #5  
Old 10-12-2014, 01:57 PM
susang Female susang is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caters View Post
Later in my life I am planning to get married and become pregnant. I have never been married or pregnant before.

Also it is often cheaper to make it than it is to buy it. One of those cases is knitting, especially nowadays where you can find large lots of yarn at an auction or on a website like ebay.
How old are you just wondering??
If you think it cheaper to make it than to buy it OK. As I said I knit socks the yarn per pair runs me $7.00-$26.00. I can buy a ten pack of socks for $10.00. I also knit washcloths my family loves them (I have three children, 10 grand children and three great grandchildren). Once a year I can buy the yarn for $1.25 a skein, it takes me half a day to knit one. So even with my labor $1.00 hr and the yarn that's $5.25 a washcloth that is not cheaper then the store. I do knit around 25-35 washcloths a year.
A sweater for a child maybe one nice one you knit, but children grow rapidly, so it may only fit for 6 months. How many sweaters in how many sizes are you going to knit? That is not cheaper then warm washable sweat shirts.
As children go given you have all these issues with pregnancy, "hunger, tiredness, nausea, frequent urination, and doctor's appointments" how will you ever have a second. If you can't knit while you're pregnant how will you care for child #1, cook, clean and all the other daily chores.
Given your other post on water I think you may be someone who is overly apprehensive, like the planning part but have no clue about the actual doing. I can pretty much guarantee all your plans can change in one second with or without children.
Maybe you could be more specific about the yarn you buy?
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Old 10-12-2014, 02:51 PM
caters Female caters is offline
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I am 15-16 years old. I buy "I Love This Yarn" which is a soft acrylic yarn. The reason I don't use cotton is because:

1) I have seen my acrylic be quite absorbent when I wet block it
and
2) cotton is more expensive usually than acrylic is

The reason I don't use wool is:
1) If a baby is exposed to wool early, it is more likely to be allergic to wool.
2) A baby in a wool sweater might be too warm
3) again, wool is often more expensive


I have never heard of anyone having an allergy to acrylic. Acrylic to me often feels comfortable in cold weather just like thick cotton does, even when I am inside a house that has a temperature close to 70 degrees F.

I know that cotton is one of those thermal adjusting materials meaning that for any given thickness it cools you down in hot weather and warms you up in cold weather. However for spring-summer clothes you can get by that by using thin acrylic for daytime and thicker acrylic for nighttime(Spring and Summer often have warm or hot days and cool, sometimes even cold nights).

Last edited by caters; 10-12-2014 at 03:00 PM.
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  #7  
Old 10-12-2014, 03:04 PM
susang Female susang is offline
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OK thank you for info on yarn.

My choice in knitting or in sewing is to start with good materials that will hold up for years and wash well.

All of your statements on various yarns are based on what knowledge?
Except maybe cotton is expensive. Allergies to wool if used early in child's life, there was life before acrylic yarn and people can be allergic to acrylic.
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  #8  
Old 10-12-2014, 03:22 PM
susang Female susang is offline
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Caters, Why do you block acrylic it is my understanding acrylic or high acrylic yarns do not block well? The best way to block acrylic is washer and dryer, as I understand it.
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  #9  
Old 10-12-2014, 03:49 PM
caters Female caters is offline
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You can wet block or steam block acrylic. Just make sure that when you steam block it that you don't have the iron too close to the acrylic otherwise the acrylic will melt.

And my momma crocheted lots of squares using acrylic yarn and they blocked well. She wet blocked them meaning that she made it wet and then let it naturally air dry.
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  #10  
Old 10-13-2014, 02:54 PM
susang Female susang is offline
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Caters, knitting or crocheting made with wool were block to give them shape and often had to be blocked with each cleaning. This is my understanding. If you are blocking acrylic or yarns with acrylic and you block them how will you care with them in the future. Since you are talking about making things for your children (when you have them) you should consider how they have to be cared for.
The instructions on the yarn you use say machine wash and tumble dry.
Please try to learn and respond to questions. People can be allergic to acrylics, before acrylic wool was used for knitting and for children. Site your statement "The reason I don't use wool is:
1) If a baby is exposed to wool early, it is more likely to be allergic to wool. site this statement
2) A baby in a wool sweater might be too warm air can make a baby to warm"
You go on about cotton thermal regulating therefore wouldn't it be a good choice? I wouldn't but that's me. Acrylic absorbent come on, if you are here to learn, learn listen understand others may have more experience then you and your Mom. See I started knitting when I was around 10 and I'm 66.
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