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Hydro/Wind/Wood/Geothermal And other types of alternative energy

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  #1  
Old 12-07-2013, 01:42 PM
MichaelK Male MichaelK is offline
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Default Importance of burning dried wood

Our homestead is mostly White Oak, with a few Ponderosa Pines, so we have an abundent source of free hight quality firewood. We have enough wood that I've been aging it for about two seasons before actually burning it. What I'm used to with dried wood is that it will burst into flame about 10-20 seconds after laying it on red coals.

Back in September I went up on the roof to check the two stove pipes. They were still totally clean, no creosote at all, after a whole winter of heating.

As we were chopping up a tree that had fallen about three months ago last weekend, most of the wood got split and stacked like usual, but decided to throw a few randum chunks on the fire. After 10 minutes they were only smoldering and looked like they were going to put the whole stove fire out. I quickly added a dry chunk which immediately burst into flame and generated enough heat to dry out the wet wood.

It readily illustrated the importantance of drying your firewood, which in the long run, saves you a LOT of time and effort.
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Old 12-07-2013, 02:33 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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you are so right. People have done it that way for hundreds of years.
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Old 12-08-2013, 08:50 AM
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Dry wood burns more efficiently than moist wood. That's also why you soak a blanket to protect yourself if you have to enter a burning building to save someone in a pinch. The water soaks up heat and carries it away as it evaporates leaving you & your blanket cool until all the water is gone. Same for moist wood.
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Old 12-08-2013, 06:30 PM
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That's also why you soak a blanket to protect yourself if you have to enter a burning building to save someone in a pinch.
The water soaks up heat and carries it away as it evaporates leaving you & your blanket cool until all the water is gone.
That's only going to get you boiled.

DRY cloth will sheild you from the heat, while wet cloth will transfer it more rapidly to your body

http://sl.reddit.com/r/askscience/co..._more_readily/
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Old 12-08-2013, 06:40 PM
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In outdoor water furnace green hickory is best.

Added: because the firebox in a water stove is basically a blast furnace and the " chimney" is a series of 4 inch pipes slanted down that traverse thru the water box. very little heat is lost up the chimney. when temp of water is up the blower fan turns off and the outside air flap closes thus shutting down the fire until needed.
Dry wood in a wood fired water stove is gone in a very short time. green wood is the only way to go and best is green hickory.
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Last edited by MissouriFree; 12-09-2013 at 11:16 AM.
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Old 12-08-2013, 08:29 PM
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yep, and you can try it by using one wet and one dry potholder when taking something hot out of the oven. See which side gets you burned.
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Old 12-08-2013, 08:40 PM
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In the past firewood was first "barked", that is, a ring was cut all the way around a tree through the bark to the wood below. This killed the tree as the water flows up the tree by capillary action in the soft wood under the bark. The tree was left standing for the year, in this way draining the wood of sap.

Barking is done in the winter after the first snowfall or hard freeze. The tree has the least amount of water in it at this time. The tree that was barked is then brought down the next winter after a snowfall. The snow making it easier on the draft horses to sledge the logs back home.

The wood is split and stacked during the winter as it is much more pleasant to warm up splitting and stacking in the cool weather than in the hot. The previous winters split wood is used in the home, and outbuildings where fire is needed.
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Old 12-09-2013, 10:49 AM
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Moist wood also has a tendency to crackle & pop as the internal water is brought to a boil, increasing the risk that a glowing ash will fly out and cause some damage.

Another point about efficiency of wood fires: a large, roaring fire sends more heat up the chimney and may actually cool more of the room off as air is sucked up and out. Flames are the hot co2 & H2O that are produced as the cellullose is oxidized. They're so hot they glow as they rise. The bigger & hotter the fire, the faster the flames rise. You feel the warmth of the fireplace farther into the room if the wood is just smoldering/burning slowly and not rushing so much air up the chimney.
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Old 12-09-2013, 01:37 PM
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May be of some help........

I know dealing with boilers anywhere from the size of a bedroom night stand to 30 stories tall........

If you can regulate your stack temp to stay close to 250* that will give you the most efficient heat exchange regardless of your fuel source, and the most dependable and safe maintenance of your positive draft.....

Good luck..... Keep warm and safe....
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Old 12-11-2013, 12:05 AM
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Originally Posted by ArmySGT. View Post
In the past firewood was first "barked", that is, a ring was cut all the way around a tree through the bark to the wood below. This killed the tree as the water flows up the tree by capillary action in the soft wood under the bark. The tree was left standing for the year, in this way draining the wood of sap.

Barking is done in the winter after the first snowfall or hard freeze. The tree has the least amount of water in it at this time. The tree that was barked is then brought down the next winter after a snowfall. The snow making it easier on the draft horses to sledge the logs back home.

The wood is split and stacked during the winter as it is much more pleasant to warm up splitting and stacking in the cool weather than in the hot. The previous winters split wood is used in the home, and outbuildings where fire is needed.
Just remembered that in much older pioneer writing this is called "girding". Like girdle or or gird, which is an old world word for belt.
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  #11  
Old 03-13-2014, 04:15 PM
Jfaust Jfaust is offline
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Default Thanks!

This has been great information and really interesting! I'm new at this game and that's exactly why we join these forums - to learn from others. Thanks again - Now I've just gotta figure out which stove or fireplace to get for heating.
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  #12  
Old 12-19-2014, 12:36 PM
Mitch Male Mitch is offline
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J, there is no choice A fireplace will burn wood by the cord and the only way to get warm is to climb up on the roof and sit on the chimney It will also suck any heat in your house up the chimney.

A wood stove is much much better if you have in mind staying warm. The best is an Ashley. Also very pricy! You have to pay for 125,000 BTU capability and something that will bank fire for 72 hours, and let you cook on it as well Most use something serviceable but cheaper.

Being a cranky old crumudgeon, I built a super rocket stove out of 3/8 boiler plate and brick and mountain stone. (I wasn't about to be inside with 1100 degrees hitting the top of a 55 gallon drum). It will not bank fire, it just burns full out. I got the only 6 inch fireplace in the county LMAO! I have to build a fire every morning, but it burns less than a rick a year! Best I ever done with a wood stove was about 14 rick. Once all that steel, brick, and stone is hot, it does pretty good about keeping the place warm through the night. I am alone now, the family is grown and gone so I only have to heat about 800 sq. ft. I leave the rest of the house closed off.

For the difference in cutting 3/4 rick and 14 rick, I can start a lot of fires

I never use pine, except for kindling, and I only use hardwood that is at least 2 years old. I do have to cut my wood up in 6 inch chunks to feed it.
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