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Old 01-20-2015, 09:35 PM
Wanderer Wanderer is offline
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Default Hardtack Sticks

Hardtack is that stuff that John Wayne had in his saddle bag in True Grit and that Civil War soldiers complained about. I like it. It's just flour, salt and water. You're supposed to roll it out and make it into crackers but I think that is too much work. I make bread sticks out of it and dunk them in my coffee. I added ginger to the recipe because I bought it by mistake thinking it was garlic powder, so now I have it in the house. What follows is not really a recipe because I don't measure anything except the water. It's a process. This is how I do it.

1. Put about a half a cup of water into a bowl.
2. Add some salt (about a half tsp?) and some ginger (half tsp?)
3. Add a ladle of flour(1/4 cup?) into the bowl and mix it with a tablespoon until the flour dissolves.
4. Add another ladle of flour and mix it until it looks like pancake batter.
5. Add another ladle of flour and mix it until it looks like cake batter.
6. Add another ladle of flour and mix it until it's a sticky dough.
7. Add another ladle of flour and mix it until you can't mix it with the spoon.
8. Make a ball out of the dough.
9. Put a ladle of flour into the bowl.
10. Coat the ball in flour.
11. Knead the flour into the ball.
12. Repeat steps 10 and 11 until all the flour is used up.
13. Pinch off bits of the dough and roll them into 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch diameter sticks and place on a cookie tray. The length isn't important.
14. Bake for about half an hour in a 400F oven.
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Old 01-21-2015, 01:19 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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How did this stuff get its name?
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Old 01-21-2015, 04:05 PM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by connie189 View Post
How did this stuff get its name?
====
Think of saltine crackers you could stack up and block the truck wheel up off the ground with.....

I may have to try this sometime this winter....
Thanks
Good luck...
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Old 01-22-2015, 12:43 PM
Wanderer Wanderer is offline
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I looked it up in Wikipedia. Tack is sailor slang for food and to get them hard enough to block a truck wheel, they bake them 4 times. Mine aren't that hard. After half an hour they're like a hard pretzel.
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Old 01-23-2015, 03:39 PM
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My godmother used to live right around the corner from us when I was growing up. She was a widow so us kids & all her sisters (my mom being one of them) used to try to go over there as often as we could, to keep her company.

Anyway, my godmother made hardtack all the time. I think there were leftover mashed potatoes in hers. But she would salt it real good & it was as hard as a tack.... so that's why we personally thought it was called hardtack. *haha*

Every Sunday my godmother would make a fresh batch & I'd walk over to her house in the evening to watch Roller Derby & eat hardtack with her. Ohhhh was it good!

As are the memories!
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