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  #21  
Old 12-27-2014, 03:20 PM
susang Female susang is offline
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Originally Posted by TheMonolith View Post
Using this site as a reference ( http://www.sourdoughhome.com/index.p...=starterprimer ) it says to cover, otherwise it could dry out.

Now, I am confused.
But, I will have to move them to larger container.
I read a lot of bread making books and that link was difficult and confusing at best.
I would buy a good book on making Artisan breads as these breads use starters (polish and levain style). You will need a scale, believe me once you start making bread by weight instead of volume you will see a huge difference.
Sour dough doesn't call for yeast my favorite starter is whole wheat flour and kamut flour and water. It doesn't have to be those but that's what I like. You should not cover with a tight lid as OzarkLady said just cheese cloth.
You can use sour dough starters you purchase, but patience will give you same result on your own.
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  #22  
Old 12-27-2014, 04:42 PM
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Thus far I have about two days into it, feed them twice, and changed their containers as they doubled in size.
Is it just me or could I be referring to babies?
Committed now. They are bubbling quite nicely atop the pellet stove.
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  #23  
Old 12-27-2014, 09:29 PM
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rubyyarn Female rubyyarn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMonolith View Post
Using this site as a reference ( http://www.sourdoughhome.com/index.p...=starterprimer ) it says to cover, otherwise it could dry out.

Now, I am confused.
But, I will have to move them to larger container.
I keep my sourdough starter in a jar in the fridge. I put a lid on the jar, but don't screw it down. I leave it loose so that gas can escape
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  #24  
Old 12-28-2014, 09:37 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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I have seen/read both ways. Most, though, say to use a loose fitting lid or cheese cloth. And I have read/watched a l-o-t of recipes and vidoe's on YouTube.

When the starter is "working", ie; you have fed it and it's setting on the counter top getting ready to use, I read you were suppose to use a very loose fitting lid or cheese cloth.

If you have it in storage in the fridge it said you were still suppose to not seal it very tight.

I've left mine on the counter top with cheese cloth only for 7-9 days. No problem.
I would imagain though that some of it has to do with were you are in the feeding cycle and how humid it is where you live. Try it they way you have instructions for and if that doesn't produce the results you want, try something else.

It can build up a lot of "gass" and, depending on what you have it in pop the lid off and in some cases break the container. Or so I have read. The starter crock I ordered from King Arthur flour is a loose fitting crock lid.
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  #25  
Old 12-29-2014, 03:49 PM
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The beer yeast bread had a distinct flavor. Not necessarily sourdough-ish though.
The regular yeast just tasted liked regular bread.
I think if I keep feeding them for a few more weeks, more complex flavors will develop.
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  #26  
Old 12-29-2014, 04:43 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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I think if I keep feeding them for a few more weeks, more complex flavors will develop.
That is why starter from the Gold Rush days is suppose to be so good.
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  #27  
Old 01-27-2015, 02:04 PM
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I haven't done any sourdough in a while, but I've been thinking about it lately and reading this thread has given me the incentive. I'll get some started later today. Thanks for the push.

Bob
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  #28  
Old 02-21-2015, 10:53 PM
samie samie is offline
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I was lucky enough (after about 4 tries) to make a starter. The bread rises but not as much as if I used yeast and the bread is soft, still good tho!

is this normal?

ty
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  #29  
Old 02-22-2015, 11:57 AM
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rubyyarn Female rubyyarn is offline
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I learned from TheFreshLoaf site that a new starter needs exercise so it gets more leavening power. This is their method:

Weigh your starter. Add the same weight of flour and water. Cover loosely and let it work. It will bubble up and then start falling back. If you have enough, you can use some of it to bake with. FreshLoaf says to throw away half of it, but I always hated that idea.

Repeat the proceedure until your starter rises and falls within 8 hours or so. You should now get a good rise when you use the starter in bread.

I'm still experimenting with starter. I still have a fondness for my old method of feeding the starter once a week with 1/4 cup flour and 1/4 cup of water and keep it in the fridge. I got a decent rise for loaf bread and it had a mellow tang rather than the tear-jerking sour taste that I get now. The husband loves it, though
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  #30  
Old 02-25-2015, 12:36 AM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Ruby, I'm with your husband. I like a little pucker in my sour dough.

Samie, Yours sounds good to me.

I read a article that explained why sour dough was better for you than yeast but I can't remember what all the benefits were now.

In a few months I'm going to try to dehydrate some of mine and see how it works when I re-hydrate it.
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