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  #21  
Old 06-24-2012, 10:53 AM
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Anna,

You present a very intersting point!

I try to buy the best quality fabric
posibble--thesame with clothing.

The closes I could come would be
Hide tanning--But you would have
to be able to hunt--kill and dress
your downed animal---

Very interesting indeed--food for
our survival thoughts.


annie
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  #22  
Old 06-25-2012, 02:14 AM
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No ladies you are not crazy......unless I am too!

Mom saved every button and zipper from old clothes, and she used them too!
I hope I still have that can of buttons somewhere.
Genuine HAND MADE Mother of Pearl buttons! A lot of antique buttons too.
I know I have a couple dozen spools of thread. Hopefully the needles too.
Most of it was kept in Tins! Maybe it could survive flood or fire in them.

Just like other tools. It would be great to have on hand when you need them.

I've never done much sewing, but High School Home-Economics class we had to do some. Most sewing I learned from mom, to mend a rip or replace a button.
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  #23  
Old 03-05-2013, 08:39 AM
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Coming late to the party here but I just joined the forums.

Idea or question about possibly long term storage for elastic - what about storing it in like the Food Saver bag where you suck all the air out and heat seal the bags? Do you think that would help save it for longer?

I spin, weave, sew, knit, crochet, you name it. So I have a small to medium stash and it continues to grow. LOL I have my paternal grandmothers Singer treadle machine but it has been converted to electric. I will get my maternal great grandmother's Singer treadle machine but I'm not posiive if it was converted or not. If it was one of them will be converted back to a manual treadle. So I have a machine to use if/when we have no electricity. I also have a serger and 2 other sewing machines.

Freecycle is a great place to keep an eye out for things too. One of my sewing machines is from Freecycle. I got some fabrics off Freecycle from someone moving who didn't want to move all her stash.

We're also fortunate to be close to an Amish community. We shop at their "WalMart" for flour, raw sugar, etc. They also have a fabric section and I plan to buy some fabrics from there. I'm not sure where they get their cottons from but they aren't as thin as the cottons in JoAnns. (the only fabric store I have locally)

Sure hope my grandaughter or one of my future grandkids takes up sewing or my other crafts because my daughter didn't and my DIL doesn't do any of this either. I need someone to pass all of this on to one day!
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  #24  
Old 03-05-2013, 09:38 AM
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CLee--welcome to the forum--good to have you.

Elastic is fickle---I try to keep mine in ziplock bags--as you say to keep the air away from it.

I do think the different climates affect it.

Here in the humid E.Tx. air--even thread will dry rot(strange term for it I know).

I have been adding old fashioned charcoal in those breathable veggie bags to my trunk of material.

Mildew also is one of our battles here.
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Old 03-05-2013, 09:44 AM
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Hiya! I think our sewing stashes breed like bunnies, too!

About the elastic, I'm not totally sure how long it would "stay good" - even sans oxygen. You ever open an old bag of rubber bands? Know how they snap apart? Well, I think (anyone else know for sure?) that elastic uses rubber... and it has a definite life span - even unused. I'll bet I probably have some scraps or packages of elastic, tho... that are already 10 years old. I have to go clean that room out this morning, so if I see one of those, I'll check. I wouldn't expect anything to last over 20 years, though.

Some fabrics don't do well, all sealed up in plastic either. That's why better garment bags are breathable... quilts and wedding dresses should be folded with and wrapped in tissue paper and stored in cardboard boxes.

Someone posted earlier in this thread, to think about using drawstrings and buttons instead of elastic and zippers.
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:27 AM
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The reminder about elastic rotting is a great one, and something I hadn't given much thought to. I found this explanation of the different kinds of elastic at this site:
http://www.kalicofabric.com/SewingElastic.html

I've used the clear elastic that stretches 4X it's original size - and it really does. Amazing stuff, but I don't have a clue about how long it lasts. Since it's synthetic, my guess is it's going to last longer than natural latex elastic. This is one commodity that I imagine would be impossible to duplicate without technology!
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:24 PM
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CarolAnn
Old fashioned elastic was rubberized---it would break down---even hot water washings--remember Mother replacing it every summer---we wore stuff out back then or passed it down.
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  #28  
Old 03-11-2013, 06:45 PM
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Txanne -
My mom told about how they couldn't get rubber elastic in WWII, so they put buttons on their nickers. My aunt was walking to work in Chicago and she felt an essential button pop off, and knew her nickers were heading south. She pointed to the sky and said, "Oh, LOOK!" and when everyone was up looking to see if there were enemy planes up there, or something - she stepped out of her panties and walked away!

We really do take good elastic for granted!
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  #29  
Old 03-12-2013, 02:42 AM
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I have several spools of non latex elastic because of the latex allergy and I've been using on those big spools for over 10 years and the elastic is still just as good as when I first bought it.
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  #30  
Old 03-12-2013, 10:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolAnn View Post
Txanne -
My mom told about how they couldn't get rubber elastic in WWII, so they put buttons on their nickers. My aunt was walking to work in Chicago and she felt an essential button pop off, and knew her nickers were heading south. She pointed to the sky and said, "Oh, LOOK!" and when everyone was up looking to see if there were enemy planes up there, or something - she stepped out of her panties and walked away!

We really do take good elastic for granted!
That happened at dance when I was a youngun---Mom and Dad were dancing--ladys' elastic gave out she--kicked them aside and went right on with the polka---Happened at a round-house dance at Bellville Tx.--keg beer/German settlers country.

Mother was allergic to the old fashion rubber---she put draw-strings in her--knickers(giggle).

There were so many things you couldnt get durnin WW2--Mother took ladies dresses they discarded and made my little dresses----I love to sew--but didnt inherit her ability to design and put to gather things without a pattern.
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  #31  
Old 03-12-2013, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MNMOM View Post
I have several spools of non latex elastic because of the latex allergy and I've been using on those big spools for over 10 years and the elastic is still just as good as when I first bought it.
How do you store it?
I have had the heat here---almost melt the rubber--it will stick to its self and disintergrate when you pull it apart.
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  #32  
Old 03-12-2013, 10:59 AM
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Annie,
I just have them sitting on a shelf down in my sewing room. Our house is air conditioned and we don't get the long periods of heat that you do down there.
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  #33  
Old 03-15-2013, 07:25 PM
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With out putting my "man card" in jeopardy, I got to say I'm pretty good with a needle and thread......

In that I keep a coffee cup size jar of assorted buttons for replacements. I salvage the buttons from clothes from the free box at garage sales. It is part of the process of cutting them up into disposable grease rags for the garage.

I keep an assortment of needles with larger eyes (easier to thread) and do everything I need with spools of "carpet and button" thread. With 4-5 colors of this I can fix most anything I need to salvage. And it doesn't look too bad..... If your careful.....

Enjoy
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  #34  
Old 03-15-2013, 08:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyobuckaroo View Post
With out putting my "man card" in jeopardy, I got to say I'm pretty good with a needle and thread......

In that I keep a coffee cup size jar of assorted buttons for replacements. I salvage the buttons from clothes from the free box at garage sales. It is part of the process of cutting them up into disposable grease rags for the garage.

I keep an assortment of needles with larger eyes (easier to thread) and do everything I need with spools of "carpet and button" thread. With 4-5 colors of this I can fix most anything I need to salvage. And it doesn't look too bad..... If your careful.....

Enjoy
You da man---good idea----you may keep your MAN CARD.
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  #35  
Old 04-03-2013, 06:48 PM
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This thread got me thinking and I want to start putting aside some "workhorse" fabrics like denim, and some every day fabrics like kona cotton for shirts, etc. I found a place with some decent wholesale bulk pricing if you can afford full bolts. They also have thinsulate by the yard and by the bolt. I'm hoping to save up to buy a bolt to put aside.

I just ordered a pattern from Quick Sew for a pair of hunting overalls for my husband. I think they will come in handy for him next fall/winter for hunting season. Gotta find a good source for camo fabric now. LOL Might need to stick some of that aside too.



The site though has what they call "bull" denim. It's 10 oz. denim in black or white. I've never heard of bull denim. Is that just a reference to the weight of denim - the 10 oz denim? Just curious about what it is and/or why they call it that. Anybody here know?
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  #36  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CLee View Post
I just ordered a pattern from Quick Sew for a pair of hunting overalls for my husband. I think they will come in handy for him next fall/winter for hunting season. Gotta find a good source for camo fabric now. LOL Might need to stick some of that aside too.
---------------
Please tell me more about this pattern.......
I have used camo material to make kind of a pull over poncho to help hide with. But it was obviously crude. And kind of cumbersome.

Thanks
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  #37  
Old 04-04-2013, 08:23 PM
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Wyo -
Here's a link:
http://kwiksew.mccall.com/-products-...ay&list=search

A good time to plan more pockets on that thing, is before you start sewing the seams!

CLee -
Walmart has the cheapest prices I've found for camo fabric:
http://www.walmart.com/ip/21853423?w...l5=pla&veh=sem
But some of the others are nicer patterns!
http://www.fabric.com/ProductDetail....a-67924efdb355
All that "Realtree" stuff is about $10 a yard or more, while the Walmart stuff was under $3. (But you also need to consider the quality of the stuff . . . which is hard to do when you order on line!!)

I think I'd just get cotton canvas (like a painter's drop cloth - that's where I get some really nice, heavy stuff at a good price) - and then put real leaves on it & spray dye over all for a resist pattern. Then shoot it with a can of Scotchguard water-proofer and you're all set. (But then, I like messing around with stuff like that!)
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  #38  
Old 04-04-2013, 11:22 PM
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I'm looking around online at some possible places to order fabrics from and some you can order samples from so I may do that since I have a little time before next hunting season.

I'm already planning more pockets for my husband. Want to get the pattern first and we'll start talking about what works best for him, where he wants them and so forth. Kwick Sew also has coveralls that I may order to make for him for the cold months. He has a pair he ordered online on sale and they are a bit big. Also styled just so that I would have to completely take them apart to make them fit him better and not really sure it's worth it at that point. He keeps telling me not to spend that kind of time on them.
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Old 03-13-2015, 10:10 PM
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This thread is a couple of years old now, but I have been doing a lot of reading during the past few weeks of both new and older posts.

Most everyone talked about machines (both electric and treadle), and storing thread, material and patterns for the uncertain future. One mentioned needles also, I believe.

In addition to the wife's electric machines, she has a treadle singer and I have an electric singer 30-15 which is which could be converted back to treadle power, should the need ever arise. The 30-15 is a very heavy duty machine that was previously used in an upholstery shop. Then I have a Singer 29-4 which is one of the machine commonly encountered in shoe & harness shops. Extra bobbins and especially needles both are something we consider of great importance in keeping all of the sewing machines functioning.

Not only do we have the ability to sew normal materials, but also the ability to do extremely heavy duty materials like canvas, duct, leather & ballistic nylon.
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