BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum

Posting requires Registration and the use of Cookies-enabled browser


Go Back   BHM Forum > Self-Reliance & Preparedness > Self-reliance > Preparedness/Survival Skills/BOBs/Kits/Gear

Preparedness/Survival Skills/BOBs/Kits/Gear If it will help keep you going when TSHTF, talk about it here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-27-2014, 12:29 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,223
Default Other Preparedness

Ah, just wondering...

Most of the survival stuff I see/read about is about stocking up.

Are there any plans one can employ for other kinds of emergencies, like what I read the other day about a group wanting to blow up a bridge here in the U.S. Or, going to see a movie or shopping at a mall.

Besides avoiding malls and movie theatres, sometimes you have to cross a bridge??

What about chemical threat to water and air?

There was a hydrochloric acid leak at a plant near the outskirts of Chicago years ago that I picked up on (windows were open). I told hubby something was smelling and not good. Went and closed the windows and soaked towels, stuffing them around the window sills. We heard a bit later about the chemical leak. (Hubby didn't smell anything).
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-27-2014, 08:16 AM
oldmaidnc's Avatar
oldmaidnc Female oldmaidnc is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: north Carolina
Posts: 152
Default

I agree... Most prepping articles and such you read are all just trying to sell you something. Bugs me because I am on a tight budget & they imply that if you don't have their $$$ water filter, or their super duper fire starter, you are dead. I think survival will be a lot more about knowledge, and alertness - keeping your wits about you.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-27-2014, 11:05 AM
TheMonolith's Avatar
TheMonolith Male TheMonolith is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 155
Default

I see skills as real survival preparedness. Yes, stockpiling supplies does help. If you have a pressure cooker, canning jars and lids, but never canned before, OJT could be real deadly.
A number of those other sites imply owning a particular item automatically bestows those skills on the owner. They never get out there and put themselves through the paces of practical application.
I think I have been to a mall maybe three times in the past three years. Same with a movie theater.
A number of small bridges are in the surrounding area. Nothing I can do about their condition. I would suspect they are more likely to collapse due to lack of maintenance vs actions by any group.
I try to look in the short, mid, and long term of goals to achieve.
This past spring, I planted fruit and mast trees.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-27-2014, 11:20 AM
oldmaidnc's Avatar
oldmaidnc Female oldmaidnc is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: north Carolina
Posts: 152
Default

My biggest step has been moving to a very rural area this past year. I'm not yet in the homestead I want, but getting out of the more urban areas was a start. I don't go to malls either -- and only go to Wal Mart every 4-6 weeks (it is 20 miles away).
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-27-2014, 12:08 PM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,223
Default

oldmaidnc,

Haven't various Walmart stores had a number of shooters/shootings recently?

Not related, but the last time I was in one, I caught sight of a woman slapping her young daughter repeatedly, hiding in-between clothing racks. I asked for security and the guard talked me out of filing some sort of complaint since he said he'd have a "long talk" with her.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-28-2014, 03:46 PM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 678
Default because it is easy and sexy

buying stuff to be a prepper is easy, the only thing you have to do is have money and then spend it to buy stuff, especially fancy tactical gear that has a look that makes it appeal to people. but knowing how to braid rope or weave a basket is a lot of work, takes time, effort, etc. but with some basic skills you can weave a basket type fish trap or braid a gill net. all the media preppers look like they have enough guns to equip an army but they can only operate 1 at a time, 2 if they have a backup and look like they are ready for a warzone. far better if they knew how to do repairs on 1 or 2 guns and had spare parts.

you don't have to know how to do anything and don't have to do any work to buy a ton of stuff. its like the suburban neighbor who has a chainsaw but only 1 small tree in his yard and only runs it once every 2 years to cut up a fallen branch, he may not know what he is doing besides starting it and knowing that it saws stuff, but neighbors know him as the neighbor with the chainsaw. or the guy with a $3000 riding mower and only a 10x10 yard.

a lot of media preppers have enough food to last a year or 2 and an arsenel to defend it, but in reality could only fire one weapon at a time and wouldn't know how to grow tomato let alone replenish anything in the food supply. as long as things are going good they assume they could learn later or just hunt game. but their approach is not to work, not to have effort and skill, its to buy stuff and have a look.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-28-2014, 05:04 PM
Lurch Male Lurch is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North Idaho
Posts: 218
Default

For myself, and spouse, the training never ends. She takes annual first aid training. We both attend NRA shooting courses, etc. I like to learn something new every day- whether I want to, or not. A humans only strong point is their brain- but you have to exercise it.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-28-2014, 08:04 PM
TheMonolith's Avatar
TheMonolith Male TheMonolith is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 155
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Setanta View Post
buying stuff to be a prepper is easy, the only thing you have to do is have money and then spend it to buy stuff, especially fancy tactical gear that has a look that makes it appeal to people. but knowing how to braid rope or weave a basket is a lot of work, takes time, effort, etc. but with some basic skills you can weave a basket type fish trap or braid a gill net. all the media preppers look like they have enough guns to equip an army but they can only operate 1 at a time, 2 if they have a backup and look like they are ready for a warzone. far better if they knew how to do repairs on 1 or 2 guns and had spare parts.

you don't have to know how to do anything and don't have to do any work to buy a ton of stuff. its like the suburban neighbor who has a chainsaw but only 1 small tree in his yard and only runs it once every 2 years to cut up a fallen branch, he may not know what he is doing besides starting it and knowing that it saws stuff, but neighbors know him as the neighbor with the chainsaw. or the guy with a $3000 riding mower and only a 10x10 yard.

a lot of media preppers have enough food to last a year or 2 and an arsenel to defend it, but in reality could only fire one weapon at a time and wouldn't know how to grow tomato let alone replenish anything in the food supply. as long as things are going good they assume they could learn later or just hunt game. but their approach is not to work, not to have effort and skill, its to buy stuff and have a look.
A most outstanding post.
My stance on the buy stuff preppers is what happens when a (insert natural or un-natural disaster here, e.g. fire, tornado, earthquake, flood, alien invasion, etc.) takes all your stock piles of MREs away?
The information in your head is always portable and non-perishable . . . as long as you practice on a semi-regular basis.
Not sure where the mantra came up, but on a number of survival sites, 10k rounds for your primary defense weapon is considered to be the bare minimum. If you have ever been in the military, 10k rounds is not a lot.
Too many focus on the, as you put Setanta, on the easy and sexy stuff. Not on the stuff that may save your life.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-28-2014, 08:06 PM
TheMonolith's Avatar
TheMonolith Male TheMonolith is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 155
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lurch View Post
For myself, and spouse, the training never ends. She takes annual first aid training. We both attend NRA shooting courses, etc. I like to learn something new every day- whether I want to, or not. A humans only strong point is their brain- but you have to exercise it.
If I may recommend, EMT-B and the NOLS EMT Wilderness EMT course.
I have taken both. In a SHTF situation, where modern hospital resources are non-existent, those courses will take you far.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-28-2014, 08:12 PM
doc doc is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: central WI--finally!
Posts: 1,473
Default

I rather doubt any of us are crossing any bridges on a regular basis that would be a probable target of mischief, so I wouldn't worry about that any more than I'd worry about getting hit in the head with a meteorite. If you do use the Brooklyn Bridge, Golden Gate, etc, then you are taking your chances, small as they may be.

A shooter at a mall, OTOH, could come up as a problem. Know where the exits are. Same advice for a problem at a theater or restaurant, etc. There's only three ways to deal with an attacker: run, hide or fight back. That third choice is the riskiest and least desirable. Think ahead. Fires are more likely than shooters.

I've said here many times before: no matter how much you stockpile, it will run out eventually. For those short term crises: power outage after a storm, or flood or snow storm that limits delivery of relief provisions, you probably don't require stored items. It'll take two weeks to starve to death. Anything short of that is survivable, although maybe uncomfortable, without stored food. My point is, for a real break down in society, you're going to need to be prepared to forage or produce your own food on a reliable, regular basis.

Speaking of "buying stuff," have you seen those tv commercials advertising prepared gourmet foods for prepping? What's up with that? They must be targeting Thurston Howell III for sales.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 12-28-2014, 08:22 PM
TheMonolith's Avatar
TheMonolith Male TheMonolith is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 155
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by doc View Post
Speaking of "buying stuff," have you seen those tv commercials advertising prepared gourmet foods for prepping? What's up with that? They must be targeting Thurston Howell III for sales.
The TV commercials you reference, no, I have not seen them. I am one of those "cord cutters" the cable companies fear so much. TV free since 2008.
However, I do see a possible niche industry for the post-SHTF economy; Once thing settle down, will you spend or trade for just a loaf of white bread? Or a more tasteful artisan bread? What about smoked bacon? Herb chicken sausage?
Reduce human beings to the bare essentials, food, water, shelter, security, they might very well to give a little more for a better product to appease the senses.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-31-2014, 06:41 AM
bigpaul's Avatar
bigpaul Male bigpaul is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: North Devon, South West England.
Posts: 74
Default

I have been saying for years that SKILLS and the KNOWLEDGE to use those skills will help us survive long after all our food stocks and gear have been used up. here in the UK the general thinking is that food stocks are only for a limited period...usually a maximum of 1 year to 18 months, British houses don't have the storage space for much more than that, and some not even that much.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-31-2014, 02:10 PM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 678
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMonolith View Post
The TV commercials you reference, no, I have not seen them. I am one of those "cord cutters" the cable companies fear so much. TV free since 2008.
However, I do see a possible niche industry for the post-SHTF economy; Once thing settle down, will you spend or trade for just a loaf of white bread? Or a more tasteful artisan bread? What about smoked bacon? Herb chicken sausage?
Reduce human beings to the bare essentials, food, water, shelter, security, they might very well to give a little more for a better product to appease the senses.

thats one of the reasons i learned how to make wine
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-02-2015, 05:17 PM
Lurch Male Lurch is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North Idaho
Posts: 218
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMonolith View Post
If I may recommend, EMT-B and the NOLS EMT Wilderness EMT course.
I have taken both. In a SHTF situation, where modern hospital resources are non-existent, those courses will take you far.
This year, she took the Wilderness First Responder course, or "Woofer". It was from a branch of NOLS that is called SOLE.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-08-2015, 09:45 PM
jebrown Male jebrown is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 353
Default

Connie:
The Center for Disease Control, USDA and FEMA all have a large amount of educational material available covering most disaster/emergency situations and is downloadable .
They cover Food and water storage, food safety. Needed supplies, health issues. sheltering in place
You will have to do some research but the material is there. Happy hunting.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 01-12-2015, 02:20 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,223
Default

??? Either way, why be "uncomfortable" for two weeks when you could be comfortable with a (small if necessary) stockpile of non-expensive, essential foods to help see you through??

As far as a streaking meteorite, not sure about that, but I didn't think a tornado would have been in my area last year in winter because of our location/time of year. Surprise!

In "emergencies" meaning "in the middle of"...
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-15-2015, 07:01 PM
Jjr's Avatar
Jjr Male Jjr is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: NWLA
Posts: 836
Default

Emergencies come in all shapes, forms & sizes. Being prepared makes all the difference in the world.

Do I/we have everything we desire or want? Absolutely not, but I have been putting away things for two decades or more now. I kept telling the wife to buy extra food, especially when things were on sale. Finally the light came on and she is on board too. The oldest and youngest daughters both prepare and have contingency plans. The middle one hasn't got on board yet, but we keep hoping she will wake up and see the light too.

Not only do we store & stock foods, but also health and beauty aids (tooth paste, soap, shampoos, shaving supplies, vitamins, pain medicines, etc.); first aid supplies (OTC medicines, topical medications, hand sanitizers & baby wipes, bandaging gauze, cotton, pads & tape, scissors, forceps, etc.); paper & plastic goods (paper towels, tissue, plates, bowls & utensils, trash bags, breathing & dust masks, etc.); pet & animal feed, [including mice & rat traps & glue boards along with roach, ant & insect sprays and fly swatters, etc.] salt, seeds & gardening supplies, tire & tube repair kits, glue, hand pumps, lubricants, etc.); canning supplies; sewing supplies; etc.

Additionally I/we are always on the lookout for manual hand tools which would be useful during emergencies when power is down for both inside and outside the home. Gloves, matches, lantern wicks, candles, sharpening stones & other sharpening devices, extra saw blades and chain saw chains, etc., etc. and books, books & more books for entertainment, plant identification, animal identification, gardening, recipes, canning times & temperatures, how to, fix it, etc.

Some things virtually never go on sale, unless a business closes, but for those things which do and those subject to seasonal close outs, we try and stock as much extra when we can get a bargain prices. I pick up candles regularly at good will, occasionally pick up hand tools and/or sharpening stones at garage sales and other thrift outlet types.

There are other preps too, which are just not discussed!

It may all have been a waste of money, if it is never needed, but on the other hand, it could be a very wise investment if the curtain comes down prematurely.

We are not wealthy by any stretch of the imagination, but have been frugal and put a little money away over the years. When we have our annual conference with our financial advisor, he also feels this country is skating on thin ice and our discussion is routinely more about our personal preparations for the future than the financial interests/discussion which may take only 5 -10 minutes, or less of the overall conference.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-17-2015, 05:05 AM
randallhilton's Avatar
randallhilton Male randallhilton is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Fort Worth TX
Posts: 1,443
Default the fundamentals

There are some excellent replies on this thread. Top tier advice.

I'm not adding to the "to do" list but simply pointing out that a fundamental premise, as alluded to in several of the replies, is invest in your brain.

One point I will make: Learn to live better with less. The less dependent you are upon the infrastructure the less hassle you will experience when something collapses. Your cat won't care if the internet breaks (even though cats seem to be internet stars ).

You have a few more necessities than cats but if you can wire, or re-wire your brain to enjoy the elements of a "prepared" or "sensible" lifestyle then you won't feel the pinch as bad when the Wal-Mart has a riot.

Prioritize the threats to your lifestyle by the likelihood that it will happen. When prioritizing, also consider as your ability to cope with the threat. Below is a thought process that I'm currently operating by. It may change if I stumble upon some extra resources etc. but for now it will suffice.

Most likely external threat for my area: Civil unrest
But what is more likely to happen: Riots or us getting old and needing easy access to health care services? Probably the latter so for now, we're choosing to stay in town.

For the civil unrest threat we're prepared to hunker down and "praise God and pass the ammo" hoping that it will pass within a few weeks. I doubt we'll need 10,000 rounds of ammo though -- I have no illusion that my merry band and I could survive an incident, or a series of incidents which would consume more than a few rounds. There's an infinite number of "bad guys" out there so sooner or later we're done.

The idea of "getting out of dodge" is romantic but the reality for us is that "living off the land" just won't work unless I can find some good recipes for grass burrs and briars. On top of that, living out in the "boonies" is very expensive if we still have town jobs. It's also very dangerous. Marauders, fire, health emergencies all temper the romance of moving out.

There are other concerns I have. The above is just an example of a thought process. As many have said, our most valuable asset is our brain.
__________________

Use less, lose less, weigh the benefits, count the costs.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 04-19-2015, 08:34 PM
Jjr's Avatar
Jjr Male Jjr is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: NWLA
Posts: 836
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by randallhilton View Post
There are some excellent replies on this thread. Top tier advice.

I'm not adding to the "to do" list but simply pointing out that a fundamental premise, as alluded to in several of the replies, is invest in your brain.

One point I will make: Learn to live better with less. The less dependent you are upon the infrastructure the less hassle you will experience when something collapses. Your cat won't care if the internet breaks (even though cats seem to be internet stars ).

You have a few more necessities than cats but if you can wire, or re-wire your brain to enjoy the elements of a "prepared" or "sensible" lifestyle then you won't feel the pinch as bad when the Wal-Mart has a riot.

Prioritize the threats to your lifestyle by the likelihood that it will happen. When prioritizing, also consider as your ability to cope with the threat. Below is a thought process that I'm currently operating by. It may change if I stumble upon some extra resources etc. but for now it will suffice.

Most likely external threat for my area: Civil unrest
But what is more likely to happen: Riots or us getting old and needing easy access to health care services? Probably the latter so for now, we're choosing to stay in town.

For the civil unrest threat we're prepared to hunker down and "praise God and pass the ammo" hoping that it will pass within a few weeks. I doubt we'll need 10,000 rounds of ammo though -- I have no illusion that my merry band and I could survive an incident, or a series of incidents which would consume more than a few rounds. There's an infinite number of "bad guys" out there so sooner or later we're done.

The idea of "getting out of dodge" is romantic but the reality for us is that "living off the land" just won't work unless I can find some good recipes for grass burrs and briars. On top of that, living out in the "boonies" is very expensive if we still have town jobs. It's also very dangerous. Marauders, fire, health emergencies all temper the romance of moving out.

There are other concerns I have. The above is just an example of a thought process. As many have said, our most valuable asset is our brain.
I agree with most of what you have said and many of the other posters also, as for that matter.

"Being prepared," as the Boy Scouts say involves much more than stocking up on store bought supplies, but having some of those supplies may certainly bridge the gap to better times.

Having knowledge and skills are essential, but basic tools certainly adds ability to the knowledge and having the proper tool for the task at hand is much better still. Knowing is much preferred to try and read it from a book, but having reference sources is a valuable asset since memory is not infallible, at least, not for most of us.

Those of us with tractors, without stored fuel, will be akin to the person with a weapon, but no ammunition. So for long term survival some stored essentials are in order. No matter how much knowledge one has, very few of us can produce our own kerosene, gasoline, motor oils, electrical (my preference over duct tape) tape, duct tape, sewing machine thread & needles, aluminum foil, waxed paper, tire plugs, patches or plugs and I can continue the list considerably further.

So purchasing and storing some things is in order, but just making random purchases is not being a very wise purchaser either. Everyone with an eye to their own financial abilities or reserves, must make and prioritize their purchase of reserve items based upon their own needs with regard to their specific locations and other vital considerations. It makes little sense for someone in the deep south to purchase dozens of suits of extreme cold weather gear, as the army refers to this type clothing, when one or two would be most adequate.

The wife's pressure canner does not require a gasket, so it will operate indefinitely. But those with pressure canners requiring a gasket to make the seal, better have a spare gasket or two for any long term survival situation. Problems develop at the most inopportune time, so having a new pressure canner without an operational seal, for those which requires one, equates to the tractor without any fuel or weapon without any ammunition, so not only the ability to think, reason and use ones facilities wisely after a catastrophic event occurs will be necessary, but also the wisdom to foresee and eliminate as many potential future problems as may be encountered as possible following any long term societal collapse is also using the grey matter wisely.

My HS English Teacher, told a story about a family close to her family who purchased wheat (feed) shorts to be used for the families baking and bread making. For those that don't know what "shorts" are, wheat shorts is the wheat by products of the milling process when wheat grain is converted to flour, primarily sold for livestock feed and in particular swine or hog feed. It's been so many years I may have forgotten the prices she quoted, but a 25# sack of flour was like 75 cents and a hundred weight of shorts was like 35 cents. Four times the quantity for like one-eighth the cost, but the family purchasing the wheat shorts for family consumption were getting an inferior product with greatly reduced nutritional value, but it did fill their stomachs I assume. Personally, I would rather eat wheat shorts than some other edible, but less desirable things like rattle snake, but if push ever comes to shove, I may discover rattle snake is pretty tasty.

For those who think they will harvest game animals and live by subsistence hunting, try spitting in the wind, the next time there is a wind storm passing through. For most people subsistence hunting is little more than a romantic pipe dream. Game animals will feed some people for a time, but unless one happens to be in a very remote and extremely fertile game area, the game animals will be depleted very rapidly in an all out long term crisis.

City and urban people with no property and/or real agriculture knowledge will be the most desperate and most likely the easiest prey.

Those with large stores of provisions, even if unmolested, will eventually exhaust their supplies in a lengthy crisis, so having a little property and knowledge of agriculture is essential, having some hand tools is an improvement and some mechanization is better still. Some poultry and swine would be a tremendous asset, if space allows and larger livestock better still, but with dire straits all around, the livestock will probably need protection 24-7 too.

I hope to never see such a predicament unfold, for it will not be pretty or pleasant, for anyone prepared or not. Being prepared is no guarantee to survival either, but it does up the odds in one's favor.

Actually those who think they are prepared, myself included, will likely find they are not really prepared if such a situation ever unfolds before our eyes!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 04-20-2015, 06:53 PM
Jjr's Avatar
Jjr Male Jjr is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: NWLA
Posts: 836
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jjr View Post
My HS English Teacher, told a story about a family close to her family who purchased wheat (feed) shorts to be used for the families baking and bread making. For those that don't know what "shorts" are, wheat shorts is the wheat by products of the milling process when wheat grain is converted to flour, primarily sold for livestock feed and in particular swine or hog feed. It's been so many years I may have forgotten the prices she quoted, but a 25# sack of flour was like 75 cents and a hundred weight of shorts was like 35 cents. Four times the quantity for like one-eighth the cost, but the family purchasing the wheat shorts for family consumption were getting an inferior product with greatly reduced nutritional value, but it did fill their stomachs I assume.
I believe most people reading this post will realize this story was taken from the Great Depression time frame, when anyone with money could virtually purchase anything they wanted or needed, only very few people had any money at all, so most people were very frugal and stretched what little money they had just as far as they could.

But in case anyone was wondering where the story came from, it was from the Great Depression Years.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -2. The time now is 07:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1996 to Present. Backwoods Home Magazine, Inc.