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  #21  
Old 12-26-2013, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainmama View Post
For my braided breads, I use the regular sourdough bread recipe:
1 c. starter
1 1/2 c. warm water
2 c. flour
1 tea. sugar (I use honey)
Mix and cover (Again in a non metal bowl and using a non metal spoon and measuring cup) Let sit in a warm place for about 8 to 12 hours. The warmer it is, the faster it will proof.
Add 3 cups flour
1 tea salt (I omit the salt)
Mix and knead until you have a nice dough that is not sticky. May need to add more flour. Let rise until doubled in a lightly greased or oiled bowl. Be sure to get the top greased or oiled.
Punch down and knead the bubbles out. Then you divide the dough in half, shape into loaves and put in greased loaf pans. Or form a round loaf, again greased pans or put on a stone with cornmeal sprinkled on it. (Always cut a slash in it that goes MAYBE 1/4 inch into the dough.) Let these rise until nearly doubled. If you want to make it into braids - divide one loaf into three equal sections. Roll them into long, round snake like strips. Pinch the beginning of the three strips together and braid like you normally would. It is best to do this on a greased cookie sheet. Pinch the ends together. Let rise until nearly doubled. Then brush the top with melted butter and bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until done. Then brush again with butter. That's all there is to it.
375 degree oven

If you want to make a nice pizza crust, here is the recipe.
1 cup starter
1 cup flour
2 tablespoons of oil (I use olive if I have it)
Mix all ingredients together. Sprinkle flour on the surface and a rolling pin. Roll dough the size that you want. Bake it for about 10 minutes then add your toppings. You may want to prick the dough with a fork before baking as it tends to puff up some. Bake your pizza for about 30 minutes or until done. 350 degree oven

Biscuits;
1 cup flour
1 cup starter
1/4 cup lard or shortening
1/2 tea baking soda
2 tea baking powder
1 tea salt
Mix the dry ingredients with the lard until it resembles a meal mixture. Mix in the starter. Sprinkle flour on a surface and either roll out the dough or press it out with your hands. Use a biscuit cutter or a glass dipped in flour or just cut the dough into squares or whatever shapes you want. Bake on a greased baking sheet or a stone sprinkled with cornmeal for about 12 to 15 minutes at 425 degree oven.
You could add grated cheese, a pinch of cayenne pepper to make cheese biscuits too.
Enjoy!
just made your sourdough braid, excellent mountainmama, the recipe is being passed round the UK at this very moment.... merry christmas xxxx
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  #22  
Old 05-10-2015, 09:48 PM
CEN Male CEN is offline
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Default Cast Iron Dutch Oven

We have been using a cast iron dutch oven (12 qt) for our sourdough loaf pan and it makes a beautiful crust.
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  #23  
Old 05-13-2015, 08:37 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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My pizza is baked on a tile @ 450 for about 12-15 minutes.

If I had room I'd have a wood fired pizza oven.
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  #24  
Old 05-19-2015, 02:31 AM
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Lehman's Old Country Store in Kidron, Ohio sells Lodge Cast Iron bread pans in a set of 2 for $29.99

Their dimensions are: 10.25L x 5W x 2.75D

The wife has two stoneware casserole dishes of approximately the same size and she often uses all four making breads, but for some reason the bread made in the cast iron bread pans always seems to taste the best.

I need to get her two more of the cast iron bread pans.
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  #25  
Old 05-22-2015, 11:32 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jjr View Post
Lehman's Old Country Store in Kidron, Ohio sells Lodge Cast Iron bread pans in a set of 2 for $29.99

Their dimensions are: 10.25L x 5W x 2.75D

The wife has two stoneware casserole dishes of approximately the same size and she often uses all four making breads, but for some reason the bread made in the cast iron bread pans always seems to taste the best.

I need to get her two more of the cast iron bread pans.

What is her process baking bread in the cast iron pans?
Does she put the bread in to raise the last time or heat the pans first and put the bread in after the pans are hot?
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  #26  
Old 05-30-2015, 09:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OzarksLady View Post
What is her process baking bread in the cast iron pans?
Does she put the bread in to raise the last time or heat the pans first and put the bread in after the pans are hot?
The pans were pre-seasoned, so she normally lightly coats the pans inside with a little olive oil (or coconut oil) with a brush and then places the proofed dough into a room temperature pan, then places the pan/dough inside the oven.

She uses the same technique regardless of breads made from mixes, scratch or sweet (Banana Nut, Pumpkin, Pear, Apple, etc) breads.
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