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Tractors Big ones, small ones, old ones, new ones, buying, using, fixing...you get the idea.

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Old 05-28-2015, 01:08 PM
doc doc is offline
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Default Over-Running Coupler Question

I bought an over-running coupler as you good guys recommended on the other thread, and later confirmed that I needed it when I finally got around to actually reading the owner's manual.

I got the one from Farm & Fleet (~$50). The directions for use are in small print on a label on the side of the gizmo- so not very detailed. There are grease fittings on two opposite sides of the unit, and the directions say to line them up with the holes in the PTO shaft. --so far, so good.

But what holds the unit on to the PTO shaft? The drive shaft of the implement has the snap ring to clamp it on the shaft so it doesn't fall off, the the ORC doesn't. It would slide off easily. The grease fittings could be removed and a pin slid thru & thru, but that would defeat the purpose of the ORC, holding both inner & outer races firmly to the PTO shaft, negating the clutch action.

What gives?
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Old 05-28-2015, 01:30 PM
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Bearfootfarm Male Bearfootfarm is offline
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Most of them I've see use a roll pin just long enough to hold the inner portion, and it should have come with the unit

http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/y...ng-clutch.html
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Old 05-28-2015, 02:17 PM
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Thanks. I knew I could count on you.

That makes sense. This one didn't come with one. I ordered it and a post hole digger from F&F. The bag of hardware that came with the digger was incomplete, too.
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Old 05-28-2015, 04:37 PM
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Doc... When I looked on tractordata.com the info on your model didn't say what type of pto it has... Maybe a call to your local dealer is a good idea..

Depending on what kind of pto drive it is, you may not need the free running clutch, or like with the old 8N Fords for instance... The implement could push the tractor into the fence...

Take care...
===
There are three basic types of PTO control on a farm tractor:

Transmission
The simpliest, and earliest, form of PTO is the transmission PTO. The PTO shaft is directly connected to the tractor's transmission. The PTO is only working when the tractor's clutch is relased, so if you take the tractor out of gear while slowing down the PTO will stop working. This is a disadvantage in applications such as mowing.

An overrunning clutch is often needed with a transmission PTO. Without it, the driven equipment (such as mower blades) will put a force on the PTO shaft, and then the transmssion, due to inertia. The equipment will "drive" the tractor, and you will still move after using the tractor's transmission clutch. An overrunning clutch prevents this from happening by allowing the PTO shaft to freely spin in one direction. In more recent models, this is built into the tractor. In older tractors, it is an extra piece of equipment mounted on the PTO shaft.
Live (two-stage clutch)
A live PTO works with the use of a two-stage clutch. Pressing the clutch half-way will disengage the transmission while pressing it fully will disengage the transmission and the PTO. This allows the operator to slow down or change gears while the PTO is still operating.
Independent
An independent PTO means that the PTO shaft is controlled with a separate clutch. As with a live PTO, this allows for full control over the tractor while separately controlling the PTO. There are two major types of independent PTO; mechanical and hydraulic. A mechanical-independent PTO uses a separate on-off selector, in addition to the PTO control lever. Often the tractor must be stopped or off to change this selector position. A hydraulic-independent PTO uses a single selector.
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Old 05-29-2015, 07:40 AM
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Thanks for the input, Wyo. This has the live PTO with 2-stage clutch. The owner's manual does recommend the ORC.

This has really turned into a cluster-eff. As I mentioned, I ordered a posthole digger from Farm&Fleet. They were on sale for $150 off, but stores don't stock them; they had to be ordered online. They wouldn't ship them to the store. Shipping came to $120, so there goes the benefit of sale price. As long as I had to have it shipped, I decided to also order the ORC.

The shipment arrived 5 days later. The post hole digger came wrapped in tattered wrapping plastic inside a skeletal wooden pallet/crate. The ORC was thrown in loose among the other parts.

Attempting to assemble the phd, I realized several bolts & the mounting pegs were absent from the bag of hardware. I called F&F and they were very apologetic & cooperative. I soon got a call direct from the manufacturer. He promised to over-nite a full new set of hardware. I arrived the next day. I also got a second call from F&F to see if everything was taken care of. Very nice.

Meanwhile, I got the phd assembled and slid the ORC on the pto, measured up the driveshaft on the mower and had to cut off another 4 inches on the shaft. Then went to mount the orc permanently and came to realize they didn't include the spring pin.

So I called F&F again and again they were most apologetic and cooperative. But they couldn't just put the stinking pin in a match box and mail it to me. I'd have to return the unit I got and re-order a new unit. On a schedule now to put up a pole barn on my WI property next week, I said I'd see what else I could do. With SW Chicago having a major presence of the trucking industry, I tried a couple truck parts stores- no luck finding a roll pin the right size.

Meanwhile, I got another call from F&F corporate headqtrs. They were sorry about my plight and had arranged for a new unit in stock at their closest stroe (40 mi away). I could exchange the one I had and they'd also give me a $20 gift certifcate. Great!

So I hopped in my buggy and drove an hour out there. The new unit with pin & gift card was waiting at the service desk when I got there. I gave them the first unit, already goobered up with lube and said I'd just keep the old one and take the new pin if they liked. But, no, they insisted I go ahead and take the whole new thing. OK. I bought a new pair of overalls with the gift card and drove an hour home.

Arriving home and ready to install the ORC, I turned it over only to find it was a different model with smaller shaft diameter!Aaaaargh! Another call to F&F. Another apology. Ten minutes later a call from manager at that "local" store. He'd over-nite the right unit to save me another 80 mile trip. Excellent.

Then I tried on the over-alls. Apparently size 34 really means size 34. Fit me like a leotard. No wiggle room built in. I guess I'll be doing the 80 mile track again anyways to make an exchange.

I mention all this just to communicate how nice and accomodating F&F can be. I 'm more positively impressed with their willingness to please than I am negatively impressed with the deficiencies.
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Old 05-29-2015, 07:28 PM
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DOH...... Reading your last post.... It occurred to me, why didn't I think of this before.... But then I never have had an ORC in my hands to look over... If the area where the spring pin goes is enclosed on both ends of the pin... You could take a grade 8 bolt the correct size, cut the head and threads off and slip in there to hold the clutch on...

But then you had to trade the pants anyway.....
Good luck...
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Old 06-01-2015, 05:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyobuckaroo View Post
DOH...... Reading your last post.... It occurred to me, why didn't I think of this before.... But then I never have had an ORC in my hands to look over... If the area where the spring pin goes is enclosed on both ends of the pin... You could take a grade 8 bolt the correct size, cut the head and threads off and slip in there to hold the clutch on...

But then you had to trade the pants anyway.....
Good luck...

The cut off bolt wont work. The spring pin (roll pin) actually holds itself in place.
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Old 06-01-2015, 08:29 PM
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Yea, a half inch bolt is loose when slid thru, so it would quickly fall out if used like that. It made the perfect punch, tho, to tap the roll pin down to the proper position.
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