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Livestock/Horses Cows, sheep, pigs, goats, llamas, and other four-legged friends.

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  #21  
Old 03-04-2015, 12:31 PM
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CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
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We had two sows that we raised from gilts. Sweet Petunia was a mellow, gentle mama and Pickles was a vicious thing that tried to eat her babies as fast as she could have them. I saved about 5 of her young by lifting them out of the pen with a pitch fork (NO way was I getting in there with that mad thing!) - and Sweet Petunia nursed them along with her own 8.

Needless to say, Pickles was delicious!
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Old 03-04-2015, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by CarolAnn View Post
We had two sows that we raised from gilts. Sweet Petunia was a mellow, gentle mama and Pickles was a vicious thing that tried to eat her babies as fast as she could have them. I saved about 5 of her young by lifting them out of the pen with a pitch fork (NO way was I getting in there with that mad thing!) - and Sweet Petunia nursed them along with her own 8.

Needless to say, Pickles was delicious!
I bet Pickles got her dinner invite a bit sooner as well
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  #23  
Old 04-01-2015, 12:36 AM
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We raised and butchered our own pigs (swine) each fall when I was a kid growing up which continued until after I had graduated college, was married and had young children of my own.

In my own personal experiences and of those people where I grew up, I have never hear of any such stories. Maybe we had more domesticated pigs than these other folks had.

Then after the feral hog problem began being reported, stories like the ones reported here began to show up from time to time. Just because I have never know anyone with something like this happening to them or someone they knew does not make it impossible by any means. It seems strange these stories first began showing up in print or articles in just the last dozen years or so. At least I have never encountered one before that time frame that I can remember.

We killed all our hogs with an old single shot .22, normally with .22 short cartridge. I don't remember one ever being shot twice, but it could have happened. Reading an article on hunting the feral hogs last year, the author recommended a .243 Winchester as the very MINIMUM cartridge for killing feral hogs. I am not sure I buy his minimum cartridge theory, but at the same time one wants to make a clean kill on any animal shot, especially a wild one, so it is better to error on the side of caution than not use enough gun.

Hogs are, or can be, dangerous, I will give them that. Boars and sows both have tusks and both know how to use those tusks! I am not foolish enough to try and roller-skate in a sounder of feral hogs either, but to say the least I am still a little skeptical of some of the things I have hear and read regarding swine in the most recent years, including the feral ones. Admittedly being skeptical, does not keep the reports and stories from being true, it just means I have not been thoroughly convinced of their authenticity.

The feral ones do pass through or across our property from time to time, but I have only seen any but once in the past decade. I was going to check on my deer food plot to see how it was progressing prior to the season opening and was without a weapon. The ones I saw did not wait to see it I was armed or not, dispersing like a covey of quails.
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  #24  
Old 07-16-2015, 01:24 PM
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Of course wild or feral pigs can be dangerous - especially boars or sows with piglets.

If you have a domestic pig that is aggressive - it needs to be turned into bacon and sausage ASAP. Not only do you not need the added risk of an injury - but you don't want an aggressive animal passing on its less-than-desirable traits to offspring. A hog-raising friend of ours has a saying "Be nice, or be eaten". Good advice.

Some breeds are more docile or aggressive than others. We raise "Large Black Hogs" - which are known for their docile behaviour as well as mothering instincts. Of course, there will always be individuals that depart the "norm" - and these are the ones to look out for.

Our boar is at least 600 pounds - and he's a pussycat. He likes attention and will lay down for a belly rub at the drop of a hat. Likewise, our sows are almost as friendly, though they WILL be a little more protective if they have nursing piglets. Still, even if you pick up a piglet and it squeals (and they do squeal!) mom may confront you but has never attacked. More than likely if you give her food she'll look over her shoulder to see what the squealing is about, but decide you're not a threat and go back to eating while her kid squeals.

A large group of hogs can be a little more challenging. We don't get to know our "feeders" as well since they have each other for company and aren't as "socialized" as our breeders. If anything, coming into their paddock with a bucket of food is "dangerous" from the standpoint that they are eager to get it and they will crowd you. Pigs are strong and have a low center of gravity - they make ideal linebackers - so you can easily trip or get knocked over with no ill intent on their part.

I wouldn't want to take a nap in the hog paddock as *eventually* they may decide you're good to eat. That said, unless you have a domestic hog with an extremely bad attitude, they won't rush over and bite you.
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