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Livestock/Horses Cows, sheep, pigs, goats, llamas, and other four-legged friends.

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Old 07-16-2015, 01:10 PM
Valiant Male Valiant is offline
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Default Leads for Organic Animal Feed

Hi All,

We're a "Certified Naturally Grown" producer of heritage organic pork and soy-free, free-range eggs. The pigs and chickens do get a little food from our woods, but their primary nutrition comes from feed bags. We're working to change that, but it's not as easy as it is with ruminants as monogastric critters can't extract nutrition from grass/pasture like a cow can. We feed our critters an all-organic diet - no exceptions.

Of course, this is pricey (up to three times the cost of regular "Tractor Supply" feed) PLUS we pay a lot to have it shipped as organic feedmills are few and far between.

Though we've talked to and met with a few organic feed suppliers, ones who produce feeds we (and the animals) like and are willing to work with shippers are tough to find. We're currently using Modesto Milling out of Lamar, California - and Coyote Creek out of Elgin, Texas.

If anybody is aware of sources for certifiied organic feed AND is easy to work with, please pass along their information so we can get in touch with them. We have used "Google" and other methods of finding them, but we find that talking to actual customers gives us better information on how easy (or difficult) people are to work with as well as how people like the product.

Thanks!
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Old 07-16-2015, 02:30 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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We didn't raise hogs on a large scale, but when we did raise them, we planted crops like turnips and grains in fenced off areas, then rotated the pasture areas so the critters could dig up their own food. It kept them busy, and everything was under our control. We supplemented with some ground organic barley in left over goat milk. Can you just grow crops to feed your animals or get someone else to do it for you?
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Old 07-16-2015, 03:29 PM
Valiant Male Valiant is offline
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Hey DoninAlaska,

We've considering doing what you mention (we're not really "large scale" either) but the problem here is irrigation - without water - nothing will live (much less prosper) and that we don't have a lot of "field" or "pasture". We have woods.

We've toyed with the idea of "Fodder beets" or "Mangels", but organic seeds are incredibly difficult to find and very expensive. Beets are also tough to grow here because they seem to like wetter, cooler conditions.

We will likely end up clearing trees from an area and planting some kind of forage crops as you suggest.
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Old 07-17-2015, 05:35 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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I always hated cutting our trees, but with goats, they will kill your trees, then you can cut them for firewood and have pasture. We had our best success with mangels started inside and transplanted--that way you can space them and get bigger roots. Fodder turnips were great, too, and were easier to grow than the mangels. There is also fodder kale that can be grown without too much effort as well as a number of grains that can be grown. Where you are, you might plant the grains in the spring, and the underground stuff in the fall or winter.
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Old 07-18-2015, 05:45 AM
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Bearfootfarm Male Bearfootfarm is offline
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Instead of looking for "organic feeds", buy some small grain bins and buy organic grains by the truckload to make your own blends from whatever is available at the best price.

That's more "natural" than some blend mixed and bagged by a third party
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Old 08-24-2015, 03:56 PM
eeyore eeyore is offline
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I have noticed our local Amish feed store is starting to carry non GMO feeds also for a small mark up per bag
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