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  #1  
Old 08-26-2015, 09:34 PM
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Default Homeschooling for the first time

We've decided to homeschool my 5 year old daughter, because our family travels a lot. So, we chose Liberty University Online Academy. I really enjoy the school as I've used them before when I homeschooled my 14 year old last year, but I didn't have to do much because she's pretty self-reliant. But my 5 year old can't read, she's learning to write, so she needs my constant assistance to get her lessons done. I don't have to teach anything to her, just read the lessons and make sure she does what the lesson asks her to do. The lessons are really simple and straight forward...for me. But to her, everything is latin. The simplest instructions seem to be difficult for her to understand. And some of the lessons require reading, which doesn't make sense to me because the literacy portion of her curriculum is clearly geared to teach students to read. For example, the literacy is teaching her phonetic sounds the letters make, but math is wanting her to match the number symbols, like 8 or 2, with the number name eight or two. This makes it difficult for her and I because she already has trouble following even straight forward, simple instructions.
I'll give you an example. I'll say, "Sally, pick up the socks behind you." She will walk around looking like shes looking for socks. I'll see that she sees the socks but she doesn't pick them up and continues to look for "something." Then she'll say, "I forgot." This happens all the time with the simplest of tasks. It's especially bad with directions, like "behind you on the right."

How can I help her? How can I keep from getting frustrated? How can I help her from getting frustrated? We're both so new to this and I don't want her to hate school because of me and my lack of experience with this.

Any tips or tricks are greatly appreciated!
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Old 08-27-2015, 12:33 AM
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You will have to teach her some sight words (like the names of the numbers 1-10). You can't use phonics on every word. Drawing shapes around the words will help some. For example, the word "two" so the shape would be tall then short. Hope I'm not confusing you.

With the directions I would start by breaking it down into the smallest of steps. For example, where is "behind?" If you can figure out a way to make this into a game and she can win a few times that should help with the frustration.

As I'm sure you know, children are all different and what works for one may not necessarily work for another. Make sure you have a good curriculum that will meet her needs.


I was a teacher for 39 years.
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Old 08-27-2015, 01:06 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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I agree with WA. Patience is the key. We homeschooled for 22 years, and each child is different. Boys are different from girls, and each child has strengths and weaknesses, likes and dislikes. Does the Liberty University Online Academy have any resources that you can access for help? We started with Calvert many years ago when we didn't really know what we were doing, and they had contact teachers that you could speak with for assistance.
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Old 08-27-2015, 01:35 PM
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You will have to teach her some sight words (like the names of the numbers 1-10). You can't use phonics on every word. Drawing shapes around the words will help some. For example, the word "two" so the shape would be tall then short. Hope I'm not confusing you.

With the directions I would start by breaking it down into the smallest of steps. For example, where is "behind?" If you can figure out a way to make this into a game and she can win a few times that should help with the frustration.
That was not confusing at all. I will try that! Thank you so much! As far as directions go, I thought a game of Simon says might help her to learn how to follow instructions/directions. I am hoping with playing Simon says that her little brother will want to play along and learn some things as well. I wanted to teach them both the same things but he's just too young. He's 2 1/2 years old, but knows his numbers and likes to play along when we pick out letters. I have sight word flash cards, maybe I can play with those with the both of them. Never hurts to get him started early does it? And that's an honest question to you WildApple. Does it hurt to try to teach earlier and on the same level as the older ones?
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Old 08-27-2015, 01:40 PM
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Does the Liberty University Online Academy have any resources that you can access for help? ...they had contact teachers that you could speak with for assistance.
Yes! Yes they do! I forgot about that! They have many resources that we use on a daily basis, too. In fact, this program uses outside sources as well to help. In her literacy class they use reading eggs and education city to help with learning words and sounds. But her math outside source has a very low volume. I really need to purchase some cheap headphones for her so she can hear what its saying.
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Old 08-27-2015, 07:56 PM
CountryMom22 Female CountryMom22 is offline
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I hope you find the help you need. But just a thought, if she is having trouble following directions, whether written or verbal, are you sure she doesn't have a processing disorder? Especially if her younger brother follows your directions well, then it probably isn't you or the way you are giving directions.

I only throw this out because my older son had and still has problems with directions and has been diagnosed with ADD. Breaking the directions down into smaller steps would be a great help, but it seems that turn around and pick up the socks is already pretty basic.

Good Luck. My boys are both in HS and now I wish I had homeschooled.
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Old 08-27-2015, 09:51 PM
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I hope you find the help you need. But just a thought, if she is having trouble following directions, whether written or verbal, are you sure she doesn't have a processing disorder? Especially if her younger brother follows your directions well, then it probably isn't you or the way you are giving directions.

I only throw this out because my older son had and still has problems with directions and has been diagnosed with ADD. Breaking the directions down into smaller steps would be a great help, but it seems that turn around and pick up the socks is already pretty basic.

Good Luck. My boys are both in HS and now I wish I had homeschooled.
You know I've thought that myself especially since I was diagnosed with ADD in school too. At her most recent doctors visit they didn't act like she was deficit at all. She just kept telling me not to compare her to other 5 year olds. Understood, but honestly... she just isn't getting stuff I thought she would get instantly. She can memorize a song after hearing it only a few times, but after days of working with her to memorize one is 1 and two is 2 and so forth to ten, she still says eight is 2 and nine is 0. I want her to get it all on her own but it seems some of it is going fast. Maybe it is me. Monday was her first day and they had her click on numbers to see their written name. Yesterday they quizzed her to match the number symbol with the number name. Does that seem fast to you? She memorized her Bible verse but can't seem to get this. I know I can't possibly keep her attention for any longer than 10 minutes at a time, but she gets bored so easily. And when she gets bored she approaches me and says, "I wanna do school."
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Old 08-28-2015, 04:33 AM
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We home educated 8 youngsters -- as was mentioned by others, each has their own learning style and personality (there's a whole book worth just on that topic!)

Some things to remember: Your daughter is only 5 years old. As was mentioned, be patient. One of ours couldn't understand concepts like "above" and "below" at that age and I expect that's true for many.

One of our sons - the one with a 140 IQ - didn't even begin to read till he was 9 years old. Then, he used the Robinson Curriculum which is very heavy on classical literature. He out thinks most college degree people.

One daughter powered through Liberty Academy and would have had her diploma at 16 but we made her wait just so it wouldn't look suspicious. She went on to pre-med.

One daughter used the "Keeper's At Home" program because she was clearly not an academic but absolutely wired to be a mom. Now she's home educating our grandkids.

Another daughter turned out to be a natural born people person so we bit the bullet and put her into a private school where she could be involved in the lives of others. She is now a degreed teacher in that same school. (she did most of her college work online).

One son was "diagnosed" as ADHD but as I learned more about that so called disability I learned that it is simply a way of processing information differently from the way typical "fill in the blank" school teachers think. (the more I learned about it the more I recognized myself )

Our so called ADHD son also happened to be profoundly dyslexic. Dyslexia is not just a problem of getting words and numbers backwards, it's a language processing challenge (it's a family trait on my side - I've had to overcome it, so did my Dad and my sister and possibly both my brothers). We placed him into a private school which specializes in challenges. Although he's been the most expensive kid of all the results have been amazing.

As I have told many home educators - don't get caught up on grade levels. Your child may not grasp some concepts as quickly as some other children. By the same token, your child may excel in some areas that others don't. The whole grade level thing simply sets up the false standard of comparing yourself to others rather than meeting your own standards.

The most important bit of advice I can offer after all of this is:
1. Major on the joy of learning - don't make it a chore. Once you do that, your next job is . . .
2. Enable the learning: Provide as much encouragement and resources as you can.
3. Nurture and nudge but don't force them to learn -- ok, so maybe sometimes you will have to say "or else" but the point here is fan the flame, not extinguish it.

Many blessings on you.
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Use less, lose less, weigh the benefits, count the costs.
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  #9  
Old 08-28-2015, 02:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randallhilton View Post
We home educated 8 youngsters -- as was mentioned by others, each has their own learning style and personality (there's a whole book worth just on that topic!)

Some things to remember: Your daughter is only 5 years old. As was mentioned, be patient. One of ours couldn't understand concepts like "above" and "below" at that age and I expect that's true for many.

One of our sons - the one with a 140 IQ - didn't even begin to read till he was 9 years old. Then, he used the Robinson Curriculum which is very heavy on classical literature. He out thinks most college degree people.

One daughter powered through Liberty Academy and would have had her diploma at 16 but we made her wait just so it wouldn't look suspicious. She went on to pre-med.

One daughter used the "Keeper's At Home" program because she was clearly not an academic but absolutely wired to be a mom. Now she's home educating our grandkids.

Another daughter turned out to be a natural born people person so we bit the bullet and put her into a private school where she could be involved in the lives of others. She is now a degreed teacher in that same school. (she did most of her college work online).

One son was "diagnosed" as ADHD but as I learned more about that so called disability I learned that it is simply a way of processing information differently from the way typical "fill in the blank" school teachers think. (the more I learned about it the more I recognized myself )

Our so called ADHD son also happened to be profoundly dyslexic. Dyslexia is not just a problem of getting words and numbers backwards, it's a language processing challenge (it's a family trait on my side - I've had to overcome it, so did my Dad and my sister and possibly both my brothers). We placed him into a private school which specializes in challenges. Although he's been the most expensive kid of all the results have been amazing.

As I have told many home educators - don't get caught up on grade levels. Your child may not grasp some concepts as quickly as some other children. By the same token, your child may excel in some areas that others don't. The whole grade level thing simply sets up the false standard of comparing yourself to others rather than meeting your own standards.

The most important bit of advice I can offer after all of this is:
1. Major on the joy of learning - don't make it a chore. Once you do that, your next job is . . .
2. Enable the learning: Provide as much encouragement and resources as you can.
3. Nurture and nudge but don't force them to learn -- ok, so maybe sometimes you will have to say "or else" but the point here is fan the flame, not extinguish it.

Many blessings on you.
Bless you! You words have really comforted me. I also thought maybe she was dyslexic but I hate to "label" her. And ADD is just like you said, a different way to learn. To me it was every conventional way to teach someone wasn't going to happen for me. I had to do it myself. I'm still this way.
So far she's able to remember things by audio. In that I mean, she hears it and she can remember it. At least she does well with things like songs and her bible verse. She can recite that perfectly. But as far as seeing something and trying to remember it, she doesn't have a photographic memory. So patience is what I'll use for now and hope she begins to grasp what I'm trying to teach her.
Thank you so much.
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Old 08-28-2015, 05:43 PM
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smittenkitten,

It doesn't hurt to try to teach the younger one with the older one as long as there is absolutely no pressure to perform for the younger one. If he wants to "play along" fine...if he doesn't fine, too.
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Old 09-04-2015, 08:59 PM
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smittenkitten,

It doesn't hurt to try to teach the younger one with the older one as long as there is absolutely no pressure to perform for the younger one. If he wants to "play along" fine...if he doesn't fine, too.
Yeah he hasn't exactly cared until we get to videos and crafts (he likes tearing up her homework) .
Now we're working on sight words. This is difficult because she has a very limited attention span and when she gets bored with something, thats it. She's done. The little guy he likes numbers better.
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Old 09-05-2015, 07:13 PM
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She is the right age for learning chess and a musical instrument (usually violin at the age). Both activities increase a child's ability to "think ahead" and learning to play music has shown to physically increase the cortex in the brain (the part of the brain that contains higher level thinking.)
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Old 09-10-2015, 09:00 PM
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She is the right age for learning chess and a musical instrument (usually violin at the age). Both activities increase a child's ability to "think ahead" and learning to play music has shown to physically increase the cortex in the brain (the part of the brain that contains higher level thinking.)
Oh wow! That's nice. Are there online lessons? We aren't in one location long enough to enroll her in any classes, unless its online.
As far as Chess goes, I forgot how to play LONG ago. It would be the blind leading the blind. But I'm sure I can find online somewhere to teach her how to play. Now to buy a mobile board and pieces.
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Old 09-12-2015, 01:32 PM
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Music lessons are usually only 30 minutes once a week. It is practicing that takes time. Our instructor will Skype a lesson if we can't get to her.

There are a couple of really good chess books out there. They aren't big; very portable. Remember you don't have to play an entire game of chess to learn how to play. Just learning a dozen opening moves and then challenging "check mate" moves is the majority of it. With a "check mate" challenge, the book will tell you how to set up the board (which pieces, what positions), then you and the student use X-number of moves to get to checkmate. There are also other games that can be played with a chess board - other variations of chess - that are fun to learn, too. There are a couple of on-line chess sites we particularly like. They have lots of "check-mate challenges" or you can play on-line with others around the world.
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Old 09-12-2015, 05:43 PM
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Skype would be the majority way for us. We have only been home maybe three weeks this year. The longest we've been home is maybe 4 days at once, max. Two weeks of that has been when we bought our house and my husband took vacation so we could move. "/

Do you care to share the chess websites? I think she'd like that today.
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