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Livestock/Horses Cows, sheep, pigs, goats, llamas, and other four-legged friends.

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  #1  
Old 12-28-2014, 02:36 PM
jokersloose Male jokersloose is offline
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Default Goats and Hay?

Hi,

I have read where people put round bails out for there goats. Can see the benefits of doing that, I feed everyday. But how do they keep the goats off of it? I would think that them getting on top doing what goats do would cause infections and such.

Thanks,

James
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Old 12-28-2014, 03:02 PM
doc doc is offline
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They're doing that on the pasture they nibble on anyways. Can it be any more of a problem on the hay?
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  #3  
Old 12-28-2014, 08:34 PM
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TheMonolith Male TheMonolith is offline
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Avoid round bales unless you know, for a fact, the grass was dried, tedded, for at least three days and not exposed to moisture other than regional dew.
Otherwise you are buying or making inferior bales.
Same goes for square, but square bales have a less tendency to heat up as round do.
My FIL, who is a idiot, does round bales. He lets the grass dry for a day then bales them in very tight round bales. Then, he has to let them "cool" for three days as the internal temperature will reach 150 degrees. He has a long probe attached to a thermometer to take readings. At 150 degrees, in anerobic conditions (i.e. non-oxygen), over three days, the nutritional content is getting baked out of the hay.
Hence, my FIL cows are eating their wood enclosures.
Meanwhile, my goats who get good hay, have only ONCE, gnawed at their wood enclosure in the barn when the square bale of hay had mold.
Many farmers now a days lack the proper knowledge to properly make good hay.
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Old 12-28-2014, 09:32 PM
jvcstone jvcstone is offline
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I feed my goats round bales once the browse is pretty much gone. Last year I bought a feeder that holds the bale about 4 ft off of the ground--good wielding skills you can fabricate your own. Goats can get up and nibble on it from sides and bottom, but it is too high for them to get on top of. Just on the ground creates a lot of waste, mostly for the very reason you asked about. Also throw them a little alfalfa from sq. bales with their evening grain when the weather is really bad.

Monolith mentioned being careful about the quality of the hay--goats won't have anything to do with it if it is the least bit moldy. Also, my goats a particular about the hay they will eat--won't have much to do with coastal, but tear into haygrazer--damn near ate a tunnel through the middle of a rd bale I had on the ground--going for the real sweet stuff. Also 2nd cutting seems to be better than first--not as stemy and more leaf.

JVC
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Old 12-28-2014, 09:48 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMonolith View Post

Many farmers now a days lack the proper knowledge to properly make good hay.
thank you for pointing that out, it needed to be said.

Considering that I have to pay for it, we avoid round bales. Since we made a feeding station along one side of the shed with keyhole openings for each goat, we have very little waste, matter of fact, I have been putting bedding down because they waste so little. This works wonderful when the queen of the barn is in a stall by herself. The others are glad to get to eat in peace by themselves.
I have tried talking to farmers about making good goat hay, forget it. You might as well talk to the man in the moon. I get pretty frustrated at times. We supplement by cutting down a pine or cedar in winter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xC80GdpclHQ
This looks pretty good.
I have seen one that held a whole bale at a section. Saves a lot of time. I would like to make one like that.
I saw mine in a book from Austria.

Last edited by bookwormom; 12-28-2014 at 10:01 PM.
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  #6  
Old 12-29-2014, 11:20 AM
jokersloose Male jokersloose is offline
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Thanks everyone. My wife wants key hole feeders. Guess I'll be adding that to my summer honey do's
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  #7  
Old 12-29-2014, 06:50 PM
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Bearfootfarm Male Bearfootfarm is offline
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You can wrap a cattle panel around a large bale to keep them from climbing on it
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Old 12-29-2014, 06:53 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
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We have done that and had some get their head stuck.
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Old 12-29-2014, 07:19 PM
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Bearfootfarm Male Bearfootfarm is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bookwormom View Post
We have done that and had some get their head stuck.
Yes, that's possible for horned goats.

For those a "Hog panel" might be better, since it has 4" openings, and you can cut a few larger ones also
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Old 12-29-2014, 09:04 PM
jvcstone jvcstone is offline
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there is a picture of the round bale feeder I bought on this link:

http://www.walkinghgoats.com/equip.html

By googling round bale feeders for goats several other similar rigs will come up

This guy was pretty close, and I had bought a good billie from him earlier.

JVC
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  #11  
Old 10-09-2015, 03:21 PM
OPCHARGE Male OPCHARGE is offline
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Default A ROLL IN THE HAY

Our neighbor put out a round bail for his goats. They ate right through the middle of it. Then it collapsed and trapped/killed their only buck.
Just thought you might like to know also, that every day when a goat wakes up, it gets together with it buddies and they try and come up with a new way to kill themselves.
We are very happy with our goats, would not trade them, etc., just letting you know it is very hard to out think them when it comes to mischief.
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  #12  
Old 10-09-2015, 10:15 PM
SevenCreeksSap SevenCreeksSap is offline
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Just thought you might like to know also, that every day when a goat wakes up, it gets together with it buddies and they try and come up with a new way to kill themselves.



I'm not sure they really plan it, but it does seem to be true
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  #13  
Old 10-10-2015, 05:19 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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If you want to use good round bales, either get a round bale feeder or make one out of fence panel(s) as mentioned above. If you don't, the wastage will make feeding square bales more economical.
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