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Hydro/Wind/Wood/Geothermal And other types of alternative energy

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Old 09-10-2014, 12:52 PM
agmccall Male agmccall is offline
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Default Wood Furnace Ductwork

Hello All

My wife and I moved into our house this spring and have been working to finish it up. I live in Upstate NY and on a small mountain and it is already getting pretty cold at night and my wife wants heat. It looks like we are about a month away from having our radiant floor heat finished.

I was thinking of getting a wood furnace and running some ductwork to the 2 bedrooms and the kitchen and maybe a vend somewhere in the middle of the house.

Is this hard to do. I was thinking of getting some 6" insulated vent tube and running to the different places.

Will this work or are there any guides available. The furnace will have a 850 cm blower

Thanks

Al
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Old 09-10-2014, 04:51 PM
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Bearfootfarm Male Bearfootfarm is offline
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Installing wood heat and running ducts would be a major undertaking.

Since you're just a few weeks from having your main heat source working, I'd suggest getting some propane heaters to tide you over, and then they will be there as back-up in a power failure

Another thing to consider is installing ceiling fans rather than ducts.

They will do a good job of getting the heat back down from the ceiling and circulated throughout the house without needing ducts, and they help keep things cooler in Summer too

If you were going to install a wood heater anyway, you might want to run any ducts in the attic, since most of the heat will rise to the ceiling, although to be most efficient, you'd need some cold air return ducts too.

Otherwise one room will have to be VERY hot in order to keep the others comfortable
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Old 09-10-2014, 06:54 PM
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Txanne Female Txanne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearfootfarm View Post
Installing wood heat and running ducts would be a major undertaking.

Since you're just a few weeks from having your main heat source working, I'd suggest getting some propane heaters to tide you over, and then they will be there as back-up in a power failure

Another thing to consider is installing ceiling fans rather than ducts.

They will do a good job of getting the heat back down from the ceiling and circulated throughout the house without needing ducts, and they help keep things cooler in Summer too

If you were going to install a wood heater anyway, you might want to run any ducts in the attic, since most of the heat will rise to the ceiling, although to be most efficient, you'd need some cold air return ducts too.

Otherwise one room will have to be VERY hot in order to keep the others comfortable
Good advice.
Besure to have a bit of ventilation with those propane heaters---thats what I use and I make sure to have a bit of fresh air ventilation.
I also keep a tea pot of water on my to keep the air from being so dry.

Btw--good luck with your projects and we love pictures? :
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Old 09-11-2014, 02:14 PM
agmccall Male agmccall is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearfootfarm View Post
Installing wood heat and running ducts would be a major undertaking.

Since you're just a few weeks from having your main heat source working, I'd suggest getting some propane heaters to tide you over, and then they will be there as back-up in a power failure

Another thing to consider is installing ceiling fans rather than ducts.

I have ceiling fans, they work pretty good as well.

They will do a good job of getting the heat back down from the ceiling and circulated throughout the house without needing ducts, and they help keep things cooler in Summer too.

Will the wood furnace in the basement be enough though, without the ductwork to get the heat throughout the house??

If you were going to install a wood heater anyway, you might want to run any ducts in the attic, since most of the heat will rise to the ceiling, although to be most efficient, you'd need some cold air return ducts too.

Too late, I can not get the ductwork to the attic without major re-construction. The first floor trusses are open so it would be easy to run some ductwork. I also have a chase where I could run to the upstairs bedroom. The rest of the upstairs is open with a loft so heating the first floor would take care of that.

Otherwise one room will have to be VERY hot in order to keep the others comfortable
Thanks for responses

al
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Old 11-10-2015, 11:45 AM
Fabman Fabman is offline
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I have to agree with agmccall here, as I am listening to the propane heater right now. I built a boiler and I am about two weeks away from having her hooked up and the wood burning, and the small propane torpedo heater is what we are using for now. I have already unhooked the electric heat, which I can reconnect in a few minutes, but I don't want to back up.
Excuse me, I need to turn that heater off. 15 minutes and the house is hot.
Being where you are, I'd suggest you get one of them and try it.
I'd also suggest that you get a couple of batteries and a small Harbour Frieght type of electrical converters so the propane heaters will run off the batteries, if the electricity goes off.
A small trickle charger will keep the batteries up when the juice is on and you'll be ready at all times for a blizzard, if that is in the coming.
I live in Virginia and while we don't have many power outages, when it does happen, even 24 hours can get really cold here too.
You can also recharge the batteries with your car/truck as needed if the need arises.
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