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  #1  
Old 11-23-2015, 09:04 PM
Fabman Fabman is offline
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Default Building our self reliance from scratch ..

I am new here but not new to trying to become self reliance. So far it has been a very bumpy road and I expect that to continue some what, but thank GOD, I have got a handle on it now, or I think I do anyway.
I am 60 years old, disabled from a fall I took, but I can still work, however at a slower pace than any employer will put up with, so I became stuck in a world of less than desired paychecks.
I was used to earning more in a week than I can earn now in more than a month or two now, but hey, it woke me up pretty fast. No more first class everything, but again, hey, that didn't matter anyway. I just thought it did.
I am loving life more now than when I thought the well couldn't run dry.
My first project after I saw that I was going to have to make due with far less than I was used to, was raising chickens, which we lost, because of the city, but I still have the know how to get started again and I will this spring.
The second one was raising meat rabbits which went about the same way as the chickens did, but again, I learned a lot the first go around..
But my third project is what got us moving ahead and back on my feet pretty much.
My main trade has always been a welder/fabricator, or a boiler maker, but I have been a foreman on industrial electrical jobs, and I have built seven houses from the ground up, plus I don't even want to remember how many garages and room additions I have built.
Anyway, I found an old house that was in terrible need of repair and made a deal with the owner to remodel it and I now lease it for $325 a month with a 20 year lease. He is a very well to do man that only let me remodel the house to help me out in the long run and he did help more than he knows.
The house comes with 56 acres of land which borders the city limits from the inside, but the house and land is grand-fathered as Farm Land, so I can raise anything that I care to.
The last house we rented before this one was a deal at $550 so I know we are lucky to get this one for the rent he is charging us.
Now the fourth project is what I wanted to talk about.
There was a 365 gallon oil tank out back when I started remodeling the house and all I could see was an out side boiler to heat the house with. The only reason that I am taking the time to write this now, is because that boiler is finally finished and heating the house and the shop also.
It took a long time to build and even longer to get it to where it is now, and it still isn't completed, but she is heating the house and the shop as I speak.(Write this.)
I still have to hook up the thermostat and wire it to the sending unit so that the fan comes on as needed, instead of me opening and closing the door a bit to make the fire flare up and go down as needed. There is several things I still have to do, but I am so happy I feel like a kid on Christmas morning.
Now, what shall be the next project be??????????????
I started building a saw mill before I fell the last time and I still have everything that I had then. I want to finish that but I also want to build a tractor from the ground up. I am just trying to figure out which one I need first, the most.
But for right now, I am taking my skinny white buns to bed.
I have already put in about 40 or so hours straight getting this boiler running pretty good.
Take Care everyone.
Dennis
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  #2  
Old 11-24-2015, 12:21 AM
Terri Terri is offline
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Non DIYers will never understand the thrill of a project done well!!!!!!!
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Old 11-24-2015, 02:00 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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Welcome, and good luck building the tractor up.

Bought a tractor last year, and has been reliable except for my own screw ups with the hydraulic system. Learned quite a bit about diesel tractors this past year, hopefully it will save me time in the future.
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Old 11-24-2015, 10:08 AM
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Ciderman Male Ciderman is offline
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Fabman welcome to the forum. I am happy your are making progress with your disability. You give people like me encouragement. (I am wheelchair bound not mentally dead.)
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Old 11-24-2015, 11:28 AM
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Welcome to the forum, Fabman. It sounds like you have your work cut out for you, but relish the work. Nothing like DIY to make yourself feel good about yourself and life in general.

Where are you located?
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Old 11-24-2015, 11:41 PM
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It sounds like you have a good start at being self-sufficient, Fabman. Fifty-six acres will give you a lot of elbow room. Those rabbits will not only provide meat, but will also produce some very fine fertilizer for a vegetable garden as well.
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Old 11-25-2015, 12:35 AM
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Good job, Fabman!!!!
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  #8  
Old 11-25-2015, 11:24 PM
Fabman Fabman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terri View Post
Non DIYers will never understand the thrill of a project done well!!!!!!!
No Terri, I don't think that anyone that is simply to scared to try to do anything on their own will ever feel what we feel when we make a dream work. I have several things to fix and/or finish on the boiler that I spent over a year building, and when I started, and especially when it took so long to build, the only people that would even think that I could do it was my family. Well, my sisters have known me all their life along with a couple of aunts who are still alive, and my wife and oldest daughter have been together for 25 years now, so they know that if I say I can do something and start it, it will be finished and it will work. But as the time went on, I was hearing, "You'll never get that thing to work" however I have wood in it heating the house and shop now and they are paying for fuel or electricity to heat with.
I have to say, "Yes Terri, there is a true thrill when you finally finish a project.
Now if I can figure out what the next one will be that everyone outside the family has already told me I couldn't do, I'll get on making that thrill happen. Thanks for your post.
Dennis
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  #9  
Old 11-26-2015, 12:08 AM
Fabman Fabman is offline
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Originally Posted by Kachad View Post
Welcome, and good luck building the tractor up.

Bought a tractor last year, and has been reliable except for my own screw ups with the hydraulic system. Learned quite a bit about diesel tractors this past year, hopefully it will save me time in the future.
Thanks for the welcome Kachad and for the good luck wishes too.
I'll tell you and everyone else here too that doesn't already know it to be a fact.
A tractor, even if it is a small lawn garden tractor or plain old riding lawn mower. They can take a heck of a load off your back dang near every day you go out the door to do any work if you are going to move anything to speak of.
I am happy to hear that you bought you one. What kind did you steal, LOL. If you are like I am, I have to steal anything I buy to afford to buy it, but that is kind of like Terri just said. You have to be able to horse trade pretty good to understand the thrill of it. Don't get me wrong. I won't cheat a man unless he is very well off. I won't cheat him then, but I do deal harder with them. What can I say?
I want to build my own mainly because they don't make anything that is as small as I need, yet as strong as I need either. I have had a few garden tractors that couldn't put up with my little 120 lb. butt, but if I get this one built, I won't worry about breaking it. I am starting with a rear end out of a small car. Don't know what Kind yet, until I get to the junk yard with my tool box, "AND HELPERS"........! It is a wonder what an afternoon T-Bone, Baked Potato, salad, Garlic Toast, and don't forget a cooler full of Old Milwaukee will get done for you. Actually we have a Junk Yard here that once a month will allow you to go down and for $30 you can bring out anything you can carry and as small as I am, don't you know I need some big friends, .
I help them out all the time with loans they never pay back and they help me out pretty much when ever I need it, given a couple days notice at the most. But one day at the yard will be the beginning of the tractor. I already have an 18 HP B & S Twin Cylinder engine with an oil filter and pressurized oil system but it needs probably a hundred dollars worth of tune up work but I am still wondering if I don't want to go with a new, small diesel engine.
We are into the $600 utility bills each month now that I won't have to pay, thank God for my boiler, plus between myself and me, we were spending $300 to $500 a month on the boiler until last month.
I know, stick any extra money in the bank and save it, but that isn't me. Even if I buy a new engine and save the one I have for the saw mill I should be able to buy everything I need for a tractor in a couple of months. I have to have one buy spring planting time anyway. I haven't planted a garden for two or three years now and that don't work. I have a large garden space picked out and that is about 75' x 300'. About 125 feet is a really nice grassy area now, but I have already built a sod cutter to take the grass down to the bottom of the roots, and I have a large area that really needs some grass for that to go onto so that will work out alright.
Heck, I am just running off the mouth like crazy here. Please forgive me for my long wind and I have to run to the kitchen pretty fast. I have to cook tonight because my wife, Stephanie is her name is working until 11;00 PM tonight. Yea, I best get to moving.
I'll say hey to the rest of you ASAP.
Dennis
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  #10  
Old 11-26-2015, 12:54 PM
Bones Bones is offline
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You might be able to pick up some NEW old MEP diesel generator engines at a military surplus site for your tractor. I was able to get two of them one for a 5kw and one for a 10kw for a total of $800. I do not see any right now on the surplus site but here is the link to the site and you may find a site close to you. Bell housing is a #4 bell housing.

http://www.govliquidation.com/auctio...e&words=diesel
http://www.govplanet.com/jsp/s/searc...0&k=MEP+Engine
http://www.govdeals.com
http://gsaauctions.gov/gsaauctions/gsaauctions/


5kw specs
Engine.

1. The engine powering this generator set is a 2 cylinder, 4 cycle, air cooled engine, with a 70 cubic inch (cu. in.) displacement. A mechanical governor keeps engine speed at 1800 revolutions per minute (RPM) under rated load conditions.
2. Fuel is supplied either from this unit's self-contained fuel tank or, by using an adapter, directly from a 55 gallon drum or other source. The fuel is filtered by two cartridge type fuel filters and a single fuel strainer. Two electric, self-priming fuel pumps supply fuel to the fuel injection pump which delivers the fuel at high pressure to fuel injection nozzles in the cylinder head. When an auxiliary source of fuel is used, three electric fuel pumps are used.
3. Two 12 volt "wet cell" batteries in series supply power for a 24 volt electric starter and for glow plugs, located in the cylinder head, and for two air heaters located in the intake manifold, used for cold weather starting. An alternator located beneath the blower wheel, and completely separate from the main alternator, automatically recharges these batteries when the engine is operating.

10kw engine all is the same as above except
Engine.



The engine powering this Generator Set is a 4 cylinder, 4 cycle air cooled engine, with a 140 cubic inch (cu. in.) displacement. A mechanical governor keeps engine speed at 1800 revolutions per minute (RPM) under rated load conditions for the MEP-003A and at 2000 RPM for the MEP-112A.


Here is a Johne Deere engine coming up for sale soon on the site. http://www.govliquidation.com/auctio...D#auction_tabs
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Last edited by Bones; 11-26-2015 at 03:25 PM.
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  #11  
Old 11-28-2015, 04:34 PM
Fabman Fabman is offline
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Thanks for the info Bones. I forget for sure, but doesn't it take something like.743 KW hr to produce a horse power??? It is something like that anyway. At least I think it's close, so that means the two Cyl. would only produce about 6.7 HP and the four cyl. about 13.5 HP., which is probably right given they only run at 1,800 RPM's.
I see some of the generator sets are for 30 on up to 60 KW hrs., so they would produce about 40 to 80 HP, which are bigger than what I want. I think they are anyway, LOL.
As bad as I hate to say it, I was thinking about buying a new China built engine with somewhere between 23-24 HP up to maybe close to 30 HP.
I think the smaller of that mix would be the best for what I want compared to the old tractors that they used to build back in the middle of the 1900's.
Not that I want to, but if I have to, I can fabricate a bell housing to match an engine and a transmission together.
Well, It is getting late again so I best get at it. It looks like I'll be working second shift again tonight and some of a third too, probably.
I can't seem to get my working and sleeping hours dialed in right any longer. I worked until about 4 AM this morning like some idiot.
Have a good day.
Dennis
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  #12  
Old 11-30-2015, 01:52 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabman View Post
I am happy to hear that you bought you one. What kind did you steal, LOL.
Dennis
Howdy -

Yanmar YM2420D

28hp Diesel
Front End Loader (nice large size)
also w\backhoe

I don't have any other attachments for it yet, but saving up to start that process. So far, it seems just about the perfect size and setup for my property.

I envy your plan of building one on your own, but my gut feeling is by the time that you source all the parts, you may have as much or more into it than buying an older model unit. Look forward to hearing your progression though!
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Old 12-01-2015, 01:38 AM
Fabman Fabman is offline
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Yea ya go Kachad. I looked her up and if I were normal people, which I'm not, I'd be happy as could be with that tractor.
No really, if it weren't for the land around me here I would try to find a tractor that I could buy and get on with my sawmill but I need something a lot lower than anything I have ever seen before.
I want something that looks more like a little sprint car racer than a tractor, LOL. And I need it a little wider than I want it to be and the only way to get what I want is going to be to build it.
I know about the money part. I'd have bet anything when I started my boiler that I'd have it built for $1,000 but between my wife and I, we spent probably $3-500 a month on it and that went on over a year so we spent about 4 times as much as I had figured it would take by the time I finished it, and although I have her working somewhat now, I still have another $300 or more to spend on her before I can feel her up and leave her alone, but that's coming also.
But that is getting a bit easier now, because I have a friend that used to run drink, beer and ice trucks on routes that decided to go into business and he managed to get several Gubbernut Grants and loans somehow and is building an ace plant and he has a lot of stainless steel welding to get done and I get to do it all making more than a fair dollar at that.
I'll tell you, when you stop and thank the Good Lord for your blessings, he'll hand you more of them and right now he is being all-full nice to me. Well, I just came up from the shop a while ago and it's already 20 til 12 so I am headed for the shower and the bed. Have a good one.
Dennis
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Old 12-01-2015, 08:25 AM
doc doc is offline
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Hey Fabman: while I'm big on DIY too, I gotta agree with Kachad> You're probably time & money ahead to get a beater and modifying it to your needs. Heck, I can see you widening it, lowering it, and adding hydraulics so you can get it to dance like those Latino street rod nuts in LA
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Old 12-03-2015, 10:14 AM
Fabman Fabman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doc View Post
Hey Fabman: while I'm big on DIY too, I gotta agree with Kachad> You're probably time & money ahead to get a beater and modifying it to your needs. Heck, I can see you widening it, lowering it, and adding hydraulics so you can get it to dance like those Latino street rod nuts in LA
Laughing out loud Doc. Yea, I wish they built something like I want but they don't. I sure don't look forward to spending all the time it will take me to build it, not saying that it won't be fun to do, but I am getting on up there and my days are running short. I'll be 61 years old the 21st of the month now as it is, but I am scared to try to ride any thing they have ever built that I have seen down in some of the places I'll be getting down in and I have no choice other than back fill a few canyons, LOL.
Dennis
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Old 12-08-2015, 06:09 PM
Fabman Fabman is offline
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Hello again everyone.
I completed Steel's Welding School before I turned 18. Actually I completed a welding school at Norfolk Shipyard, in Virginia, after that and that too was before I turned 18.
Anyway, the point is that at one time I was an excellent welder and even though the boiler gave me a it welding it, I'd have bet anything that I wouldn't have had any leaks, period, but I was wrong.
There wasn't but two so far, and one was outside the storage tank which was easy to repair, but the second one is inside the firebox around a boiler tube and boy is that a mess in there right now.
It is just a slow leak. Actually a drip, drip, drip, drip, about one drip every second and a half or so but I'll tell you something. Let's just say 40 drips per minute = 2,400 drips per hour and when I ill the boiler up with wood and don't check it or 10 hours, that is about 24 thousand drips o water that has made a cement type mud out o all the ashes rom the ire and that people, is one heck o a mess.
It is supposed to be nice tomorrow so I have already loaded the boiler up with what wood I think it will take to keep us warm until sun up and I am going to go rent a steam cleaner so I can clean the inside out good enough to weld that dang hole up.
Other than that giant headache that it has given me, which I have right now, Thank God, that is the only complaint that I have with the boiler, except I am still waiting to get the blower or the firebox installed and wired up.
I'll give you all an update when that is done but for now, I am going to start a new thread about a wood splitter that I hope to build.
Let me see here. Look at my next Thread named "New Bread of Wood splitters."
Dennis
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Old 12-08-2015, 06:50 PM
doc doc is offline
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I know the aggravation.

Years ago, I stuffed a small block Chevy into one of those little pagoda style Mercedes 2-seaters. Among other changes needed to make it fit, I had to custom fabricate an oil pan, using two old ones and piecing them together. It must have had about 3 ft of weld line on it.

When I got done, I filled it with water and viola! not a single leak! After doing the Dance of Joy, I stuck it on the engine and filled 'er up with oil.

It leaked oil like a darn shower head. Water is sticker than oil, I learned and makes bigger drops that won't fit thru the little holes that oil will.

About 5 lb of brazing later, it finally stopped leaking oil.
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Old 12-09-2015, 05:44 PM
Fabman Fabman is offline
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Lord have mercy Doc, you just took me back a hundred years. Out of all the things I talk about, I had completely forgotten about my 1963 falcon.
It didn't last long enough to make a lot of memories I guess.
A guy I knew bought a brand new 1971 Boss 351 Mustang and didn't have it but a couple o weeks and wiped it out completely.
I don't know how, but he didn't have nothing but a few scraps and bruises but the car was shot and I bought it or $207.91, if I remember right.
Anyway, I had to do the same thing to get the engine into the falcon plus cut the shock towers and redo them and all, but I remember making a puzzle out o sheet metal and braising that thing together.
I guess that engine was unlucky for the cars but it somehow went the distance or the drivers.
I cut a tree down with it and the engine did all the work. And I had nothing but cuts and bruises.
The wrecker parked the car at my grandmothers house and many years later, I sold it or $400 for the Transmission and rear end.
Oh yea, I narrowed the rear from the Mustang to it the falcon. That was one of my projects when I worked in the Dan River Mills Machine Shop in years gone bye..
Man, why can't we go back in time? We can do almost anything else.
I'd give anything, short o my kids, to go back to the 60's and 70's.
Dennis
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