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Old 06-10-2014, 12:11 PM
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Ciderman Male Ciderman is offline
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Default Hi Point 9mm Handgun

I was searching the internet yesterday and found a Hi Point 9mm Handgun here is the Gander Mountain link http://www.gandermountain.com/modper...ndgun&i=733319 and the Hi Point Manufacturer link http://hi-pointfirearms.com/handguns/handguns_9mm.html

I am looking for a a dream gun (very affordable, reliable and small enough to carry hidden in a pocket) if there is such a think. Has anyone had any experience (pro or con) with the Hi Point 9mm handgun? I am hopping this may be my "affordable" gun. Being like most others here on a strict budget. My main concern is being able to hide the gun either in my pockets or a easy accessible bag attached to my wheelchair this is not obvious a holster. All comments are greatly appreciated and thanks in advance.
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Old 06-10-2014, 01:58 PM
Sacalait50 Male Sacalait50 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ciderman View Post
I was searching the internet yesterday and found a Hi Point 9mm Handgun here is the Gander Mountain link http://www.gandermountain.com/modper...ndgun&i=733319 and the Hi Point Manufacturer link http://hi-pointfirearms.com/handguns/handguns_9mm.html

I am looking for a a dream gun (very affordable, reliable and small enough to carry hidden in a pocket) if there is such a think. Has anyone had any experience (pro or con) with the Hi Point 9mm handgun? I am hopping this may be my "affordable" gun. Being like most others here on a strict budget. My main concern is being able to hide the gun either in my pockets or a easy accessible bag attached to my wheelchair this is not obvious a holster. All comments are greatly appreciated and thanks in advance.
http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/201...c9-9mm-pistol/

What is your price range ? http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/p...ducts_id/25990

http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/p...ducts_id/73923

Buds has decent prices but you may find a better deal locally. My EDC pocket carry is a 38 snubby with Gold Dot Short Barrel ammo.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k890Rio2oBY

With the .38 snubby I carry a 6 round strip. Five JHP plus one snake shot for poisonous snakes .
http://www.bianchi-intl.com/model-580-speed-strips

Last edited by Sacalait50; 06-10-2014 at 02:34 PM.
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  #3  
Old 06-10-2014, 04:23 PM
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Hi Point............

Do not walk. RUN away as fast as you can.

Cast metal parts and low quality steel, as well as poor machining practices.

Not worth the money at any price.
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Old 06-10-2014, 04:57 PM
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Not pretty and heavy.
They are cheap and there is a reason for that.
A lot of people hate them and have nothing good to say about them, but they sure seem to sell a lot of them.
All that said I have shot one in .40 and it worked as it should.
I have thought about getting one just to throw in my truck.
If you really want one shop around.
I've seen them for around $150.
Lifetime warranty and built like a brick.
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Old 06-10-2014, 10:14 PM
StockdaleDave Male StockdaleDave is offline
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Tough as nails. Ugly as Hell. Goes bang when you pull the trigger. Lots of positive reviews but a good amount of negative press because it is cheap and ugly. Brand name buyers hate it. If you don't like it don't buy it. It is heavy. For an inexpensive handgun it is not bad. If money is an issue personally I'd shop for a higher quality used gun if your life depends upon it.

In my area you get a new Smith & Wesson 9mm for $279-$299.
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Old 06-11-2014, 12:35 AM
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A guy at a machine shop I worked in once had one in 9mm....
He said it didn't feed, didn't eject....

He said if you had about 8 of them.... They might make a decent boat anchor... They may be better now...

I can't say I've heard bad things about there carbines.... But not any good reviews either....

Good luck...
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Old 07-13-2014, 02:07 PM
hunter88 hunter88 is offline
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I bought a 9mm High Point for $149 and have felt it was worth the money.

It's too big and too heavy for conceal carry, it's called the brick for a reason. But for a bedside, glove box, or tackle box type gun it is fine.

I agree gun purists don't like it, but it is made in Ohio and comes with a lifetime guarantee.

I did a Goggle search for a couple days on the High Point before buying my gun. There is some negative comments, but all seemed to come from gun purists or gun snobs, and people with little experience using a hand gun. Improper ejecting or loading seemed to come from people not shooting a handgun before and shooting with a limp wrist. Also the clip might push too hard in some cases, so you fill the clip and let it sit around that way for a while. The spring will lose some tension and the problem is solved in most cases. Also it seemed to me almost all problems came about with people having only shot the gun 50 times or less. Almost all complained they didn't get through a box of shells and had problems. When you talk to people that have shot hundreds of rounds through the gun it appears the gun breaks in well and any problem that may come up goes away. Also the type of ammo used makes a difference.

http://www.handgunsmag.com/2011/05/3...ak-a-hi-point/

These guys did 3 or 4 test videos.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FoWpog5KU4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckA_dBXuceo
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Old 07-14-2014, 11:32 AM
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Thanks for all your replies. I truly appreciate them. I have to look for a handgun I can breakdown for cleaning. Something easy for my hands. So far I have ruled out Glock.
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Old 07-14-2014, 12:13 PM
hunter88 hunter88 is offline
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If you need something easy to break down how about a revolver instead of a semi auto.

While the High Point is an ok gun it is not one that fits your needs as far as small and fits in your pocket. Also if you need something easy to work with your hands, again the revolver may be the answer because it would be easier to use.

After shooting the high point, and a couple other semi autos, I decided if I was going to carry a gun it would be a revolver.

The first reason is I am left handed, and most safeties and eject buttons are designed for right hand shooters. There are some guns that work from either side, but of course then you're limited to those guns, and that might exceed your budget.

My second reason was experience shooting. While I've shot a lot of guns, if you are carrying a gun for self defense, shooting it better be second nature to you so you don't have to think about what you're doing. Shooting a few hundred rounds through a semi auto would not be enough for you to pull out that gun and not have to think about the safety or anything else. Plus are you going to carry it with one in the chamber at all times. If not, cocking the semi auto will take too much time when it's needed.

I like the 9mm because the cost to shoot isn't as great, which means you will shoot more. I found a small 9mm revolver a while back. I can't remember the maker, but it was nice and small. It came with a couple speed loaders, which is needed for the 9mm in revolver form. The gun had no hammer, so it was point and pull the trigger, nothing to think about when the time comes. The revolver also allows you to leave the hammer on an empty chamber, but it still just requires you to pull the trigger to make it work.

For me, if I'm buying a small gun to carry, that is probably what I will buy.
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  #10  
Old 07-26-2014, 11:27 AM
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I have a revolver and love to shoot it.

After much thought and research I have purchased a Springfield XD 9mm. I was able to break down this gun without any problem unlike the Glock or S&W due to my small hands and hand strength.

I would like to thank everyone for their comments and suggestions.
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Old 09-02-2015, 04:46 PM
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I own the 995TS carbine and the C9 pistol. IMO the carbine is easy to shoot and prolly one of the best price/performance bargains on the market.

The C9 pistol requires more effort to use with OK accuracy. It's too heavy/bulky as CCW pistol, and a pain to take down for cleaning and maintenance. I shoot better with .38 special revolver, but for the price of the revolver you can buy 2-3 C9 pistols for your bedroom gun safe and car trunk get home bag.

If you are looking to buy a pistol, I would suggest going to a local range with rental guns and try different pistols/revolvers to find ones that you like. Before you buy, check YouTube for takedown and cleaning videos. The Beratta 92 pistol is easy to take down and reassemble. Ruger .22 pistol is easy to take down but a pain to put back (the ruger dance).

In terms of reliability, I never had FTF with the 995TS, and only 1 FTF on the C9 during break in period (first 200 rounds). Some C9 owners have had to polish their feed ramp. For home defense scenario, I would reach for my O/U shotgun with rubber slug in upper and buck shot in under.
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Old 09-02-2015, 06:52 PM
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Against the advice of the manufacturer I took a Hi Point apart.
Took me a long time to get it back together.
I should have known better but it was filthy and I wanted to clean it.
I'll just hose it down with CLP from now on and call it good to go.
New for $128 I can live with not disassembling it.
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Old 09-03-2015, 12:57 AM
momopi Male momopi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by backlash View Post
Against the advice of the manufacturer I took a Hi Point apart.
Took me a long time to get it back together.
I should have known better but it was filthy and I wanted to clean it.
I'll just hose it down with CLP from now on and call it good to go.
New for $128 I can live with not disassembling it.
I used this video as a guide to taking it down for cleaning:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dat3E-SxRZc

It was still a pain in the butt to punch the retaining pin out, and even harder to get it back in.


On side note, here's a pic of 25 yard groups from my Hi Point 995 TS carbine:



We mounted a $20 air rifle scope for testing, and the results were very good. Will test it at 50/75/100 yards later.
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Old 09-07-2015, 08:58 AM
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Over the past 10 years, or so, I've never seen a Hi-Point pistol fire, either, 50 consecutive rounds or run for more than, say, an hour without experiencing some sort of stoppage. It's not a question of, 'will it stop working' but, 'when will it stop working' because it's gonna stop; a Hi-Point breaking down is only a matter of time.

This is, also, the first time I've ever heard anyone say that a Glock is hard to take apart. How can a Glock be, 'hard' to take apart? (Too bad someone didn't show the OP how to do it right!) Personally I dislike cleaning a revolver. I've been cleaning revolvers and semiautomatics for many years; and I'd rather clean a semi-auto, anytime, rather than a revolver - Which I, also, like to shoot; but that's neither here, nor there.

With a semi-auto there is only one chamber to clean; with a revolver there are, at least, five! Then there's the problem of getting all the splatter and melted lead off the cylinder face, and away from the area around the forcing cone - Always a difficult and time-consuming job!

If it weren't for things like: hunting, protection from large animals, and long-range pistol shooting I think revolvers might have already gone the way of the dinosaur; however, when I'm in the woods, I prefer to carry a revolver - A big revolver!



GLOCK DISASSEMBLY:

1. DROP THE MAGAZINE.

2. WITH YOUR TRIGGER FINGER HELD OUT STRAIGHT, CLEAR THE PISTOL'S FIRING CHAMBER BY RACKING THE SLIDE THRICE.

3. LOCK THE SLIDE IN ITS REARWARD POSITION.

4. LOOK AND POKE YOUR INDEX FINGER INTO THE CHAMBER! (IT SHOULD BE EMPTY!)

5. NOW, BEFORE YOU DO ANYTHING ELSE, REMOVE THE MAGAZINE AND ANY DISCOVERED AMMUNITION AWAY FROM THE WORK AREA. (AMMUNITION SHOULD NEVER BE KEPT EITHER IN, OR NEAR A WORK AREA!)

6. CLOSE THE SLIDE.

7. FINALLY - AND WITHOUT DOING SOMETHING INCREDIBLY STUPID LIKE HOLDING YOUR SUPPORT-HAND IN FRONT OF THE MUZZLE - POINT THE PISTOL'S MUZZLE IN A CLEAR AND SAFE DIRECTION.

8. PULL THE TRIGGER AND LEAVE IT IN ITS REARWARD POSITION.

Now, you're ready to disassemble your Glock! Place the pistol in the middle of your strong-hand with the muzzle pointing away from you. Wrap your fingers over the top of the slide while curling your thumb underneath the back of the frame. Next, squeeze your fingers and thumb towards each other.

After about 1/16th of an inch of rearward travel you'll feel the slide make a little, 'bump' as the front barrel lug comes out of the groove in the slide lock. Reach up with your support-hand from underneath the pistol, and grab the two ends of the slide lock between your index finger and thumb. Pull down.

Now, release the backwards pressure of your strong-hand fingers on the slide; it will spring forward, and your Glock's apart! (Once you have the pistol in hand it should take no more than, about, 3 seconds to fully break it apart - It's easy!)
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Last edited by Stinger; 09-07-2015 at 10:46 AM.
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Old 12-23-2015, 12:33 PM
newbiehal Male newbiehal is offline
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As I say in my title, I'm new to the modern handguns, so bear with me. I joined to learn, so if you want to insult me for buying a Hi-Point pistol, I'll pack up my tent and leave. That being said, what can I do to my C-9 to make it better than is so often described on blogs. I read on a blog recently that you can replace the pin that holds it together with a set screw that would simplify total dis-assembly. Has anyone tried this?
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Old 12-23-2015, 03:48 PM
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I have disassembled a Hi Point and I don't think I will do that again.
The manufacturer recommendation is to not take it apart for cleaning.
Never read about a set screw being used instead of a pin.
My major problem when I took one apart was a spring went shooting out and I had to crawl around on the floor for a long time looking for it.
Then I found 2 springs and had no idea if either one or both went in the gun, or where in the gun they went.
YouTube was a big help and I figured out I had found an extra spring from who knows where.
There doesn't seem to be a lot of gun snobs on here so I wouldn't worry about getting insulted.
Welcome aboard by the way.
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Old 12-23-2015, 08:32 PM
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I also read that the manufacturer recommends only infrequent total disassembly. The rear sights are adjustable, but which way to turn the screw? BTW I took it to the range the other day, and yes, it had some FTE's anf FTF's, but by the time I reached an empty box of ammo, it had smoothed out. Only a few were not in the body core area. Being on a fixed income, this seems like a "no brainer" to me, oh, I own a Honda Civic, even though I'd like to own a Jaguar.
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Old 12-24-2015, 12:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by momopi View Post
I own the 995TS carbine and the C9 pistol. IMO the carbine is easy to shoot and prolly one of the best price/performance bargains on the market.

In terms of reliability, I never had FTF with the 995TS, and only 1 FTF on the C9 during break in period (first 200 rounds).
Would you be inclined to do a review of your carbine. Possibly in a new thread so as to not hijack this one. I have looked at them in the past, but with no one I know, that could provide any insight to their abilities, like accuracy, maintenance, performance, & function. One of the Hi-point carbines looks like a great addition for those less accurate or qualified with a handgun.

The appearance of a firearm may be very appealing at a trap shoot or on the skeet range, but late at night, most likely in the dark appearance should be the least of concern for a defensive weapon.
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