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  #1  
Old 05-13-2016, 10:27 AM
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Default Seed Planter

Living in the 'burbs with only a 14' x 16' garden plot, I always just planted seeds by hand. But hoping to move to my 40 acres in WI in a month or two, I wanted to get a bigger garden going there. I ordered one of these two-wheeled planters: http://www.earthway-outlet.com/Earth...den-Seeder.htm

I tried it out on the small plot to see how it worked: pretty good. But yesterday I used it to plant peas & beans in WI: it sucked. The soil, freshly tilled with with my tractor and 5 ft rototiller, was six inches deep of soft, fluffy soil. The wheels on the planter didn't roll to activate the seed dispersal wheel, but just plowed thru the dirt. And the chain that drags to cover the seeds (that didn't drop very regularly anyway) was useless.

Anybody else with experience with these gizmos?
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Old 05-13-2016, 02:25 PM
Mad_Professor Mad_Professor is offline
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So how big is the plot you need a seeder? That seeder is a toy, not something I'd put on a tractor.

I can see the need for acres of corn and such, but unless you are commercial, you will have more vegetables than you can care for. Keeping up with watering, weeding and pests/disease will consume your summer. Deer will eat your peas and beans in short order unless you have a field or fence. You won't get into that much with that seeder.

Learn how to properly, plant your seeds , by hand. That seeder, as you know, won't do as good as a trained human. If the soil is prepped you can plant more than you will need in a day or two.

My vegetable garden (acre) is plowed/harrowed with a 9N then tilled with an old USA made troy built if needed. I put in some buckwheat as the deer prefer that and fence other things to keep them and the rabbits/woodchucks out. I shoot/eat all three so I get some of my produce back from the varmints. Mice/voles can also be a problem, got cats?
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Old 05-13-2016, 07:47 PM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
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I have one but have not used it yet, bought it for $5 in a yard sale and bought replacement seed plates (only had the one for beets on it). I plan to use it to plant 2 acres of corn
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Old 05-13-2016, 11:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Mad_Professor View Post
So how big is the plot you need a seeder? That seeder is a toy, not something I'd put on a tractor.

I can see the need for acres of corn and such, but unless you are commercial, you will have more vegetables than you can care for. Keeping up with watering, weeding and pests/disease will consume your summer. Deer will eat your peas and beans in short order unless you have a field or fence. You won't get into that much with that seeder.

Learn how to properly, plant your seeds , by hand. That seeder, as you know, won't do as good as a trained human. If the soil is prepped you can plant more than you will need in a day or two.

My vegetable garden (acre) is plowed/harrowed with a 9N then tilled with an old USA made troy built if needed. I put in some buckwheat as the deer prefer that and fence other things to keep them and the rabbits/woodchucks out. I shoot/eat all three so I get some of my produce back from the varmints. Mice/voles can also be a problem, got cats?
I used the tractor to break the sod because the land has been pasture for the 100 yrs or so since it was originally clear-cut. The plot is only 75'x 50'. I wanted to use the seeder instead of crawling around like a reptile to plant by hand- but that's what I wound up doing anyway.

Here in the 'burbs, we're adjacent to the 66,000 ac forest preserves, so I'm well aware of the competition with wild- life. Although deer frequently wander up and down the street, they never bother hopping the 4' fences to get into backyard gardens, nor do the coyotes-- 'coons & skunks are another matter and have taken a toll on my chickens.

I've always said you don't "own" barn cats-- they merely exercise free will in choosing to stay on your property. They frequently take mice & voles and I haven't seen a rabbit in the neighborhood in 14 yrs.
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Old 05-14-2016, 12:19 AM
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tgp7799 Male tgp7799 is offline
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I have used that planter for years on a 40'X60' garden. I till my garden with a 50 hp tractor and a 6" tiller. What I do is fill my 1000 lb. roller about half full and go over the garden after tilling and before planting. Seeds need to have good contact with the soil to grow properly. That is why framers run a cultipacker behind their disk or planter. I have done this for years and never had a problem with the earthway planter.
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Old 05-14-2016, 03:48 PM
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Old 05-15-2016, 12:50 AM
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Originally Posted by tgp7799 View Post
I have used that planter for years on a 40'X60' garden. I till my garden with a 50 hp tractor and a 6" tiller. What I do is fill my 1000 lb. roller about half full and go over the garden after tilling and before planting. Seeds need to have good contact with the soil to grow properly. That is why framers run a cultipacker behind their disk or planter. I have done this for years and never had a problem with the earthway planter.
Thanks for the tip. It confirms what I suspected. That drive wheel on the planter needs a firmer base to roll on. I'll file that one for use next year.
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