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Preparedness/Survival Skills/BOBs/Kits/Gear If it will help keep you going when TSHTF, talk about it here.

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Old 01-26-2016, 09:34 PM
Nickathome Nickathome is offline
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Default Anyone still use tire chains in winter?

With this blizzard we've just gone through here in the northeast, I was just curious if anyone still uses the old school tire chains. I've read where a lot of jurisdictions consider them to ruin roads and have thus made them illegal to use, however I do not know of anywhere around here that may have such a law in place. That said, I do carry a set of full chains in my truck behind my seat for that just in case event where I'm out and need to get home. If I happen through an area that considers them illegal, well the police man will just have to chase me through the snow I guess, because I'm using them regardless.

BTW - I was home throughout this latest storm so did not need to use the chains, but they stay in my truck, along with other winter preparedness gear until spring when the threat of snow is over.
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Old 01-27-2016, 03:34 PM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Yes.... Traditional tire chains are/have been a staple item in my old POS (piece of s#!%) Dodge truck... I'm going to guess 99.9% of modern to include 20 or so year old cars, suv, etc can not use chains by the way they are designed and made...

Unless the vehicle is a traditional frame style vehicle, like a truck it likely won't have clearance to run chains.. Even cable wire chains would be of marginal fit on many vehicles..

News shows people out shoveling and spinning wheels to get places that are no better cleared or accessible than where they are at... This effort is a waste of energy, and danger to themselves and others many times..

My John Deere tractor is a given for using chains here in the far frozen north..

Like you said.. If weather gets bad enough, I stay home.. I'm at a stage of life with no outside obligations that I can make the decision to stay or go as it is safest for me.. Back to being like a 4 year old as the world revolves around me and my needs at this moment...

Keep safe...
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Old 01-27-2016, 04:13 PM
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backlash Male backlash is offline
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I bought a set for my 4X4 truck when I drove over the mountains at Christmas.
Didn't need them fortunately even tho it was one of the worst trips I have made in a long time.
The pass closed just after I got over.
When chains required signs are up you must chain up unless you have 4 wheel drive.
The State Police can require all vehicles to chain up regardless so I bought them.
On April 1st I will take them back to Les Schwab tires and they will refund my $107.
Washington state contracted with several people to install chains for people.
$75 and some young guy would put your chains on for you while you sat on your butt nice and warm.
I haven't actually needed chains in over 30 years. If it that bad I stay home.
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Old 01-27-2016, 07:36 PM
Mad_Professor Mad_Professor is offline
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For the truck they live in a lidded 5-gal bucket, they go on the tractor when we get freeze up.
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Old 01-27-2016, 08:52 PM
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I still have a full set of 4 for my pickup and a pair for Mrs. Ct's front wheel drive car. If (when) the main road by our house gets closed the only way out is by township dirt roads which are usually solid ice this time of year.

Haven't had to use them since moving from our previous home that was 8 miles up one of those back roads.

I am a firm believer in winter tires. The "all season" tires do nothing at all for you in any kind of snow/ice/slop. The difference in traction and more importantly turning and stopping is amazing.
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Old 01-27-2016, 09:40 PM
Nickathome Nickathome is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyobuckaroo View Post
Unless the vehicle is a traditional frame style vehicle, like a truck it likely won't have clearance to run chains.. Even cable wire chains would be of marginal fit on many vehicles..
This is very true, even with trucks to a degree. I still have a couple pairs of the old "strap chains", which are just two chains with a strap that goes through the rim. I used to use them on my old Ford Ranger whenever I needed the extra traction. They were easier to put on and take off than a set of full chains, yet still provided enough traction to unstick the rear tires. Problem with strap chains on today's vehicles is, the modern trucks, SUV's etc all have rear disc brakes, and you can't run strap chains with disc brakes just not enough clearance. Now my son has a 1994 GMC Jimmy that has rear drums so I gave him a set of the strap chains to use if he ever needs some extra help. I'd have given them all to him but we found out one of the sets of strap chains ( the older of the two) has straps that are too short for his tire size.
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Old 01-28-2016, 12:00 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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When I first moved onto the road system here and only had one vehicle with front-wheel drive, I used the cable-style to keep moving, but we usually use studded winter tires and 4-wheel drive now if things get really ugly. The wife still only has front wheel drive with studded winter tires on her car, and she is really never stranded (she stays on main roads). We always use the 4-wheel truck for ice fishing and driving on back roads.
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Old 01-28-2016, 12:33 AM
Mad_Professor Mad_Professor is offline
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Make sure you know how to properly install the chains.

A good farm grade bumper type jack should be in your truck too, that lets you get the wheel up and the chains on tight. I've seen a chain jump off and rip out a brake line. No brakes in the snow is not good either.

To go with the jack add a couple of 2 x 10" that you can put under wheels when needed. Also a couple of logging chains. The farm jack can double as a cumalong hooked to the chains.
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Old 01-28-2016, 02:15 AM
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We hardly every get enough snow to need chains and studs are illegal here. Chains have not be outlawed to my knowledge, but in the area where I grew up there were a lot of dirt and gravel roads and mud can be just as difficult to navigate as snow and ice, so dad had a pair of the real chains he kept for use in the winter.

Almost every new vehicle with a different tire size requires a different set of chains or cables. The Chains are so rough, I have never had a set of the old "real chains" myself. I have purchased the newer cable 'chains' and have a number of different sets purchased for past vehicles, some of which were never used. Others were used a few times, but I doubt any will fit the vehicles we own today.

It was always cheaper for me to use a couple of days annual leave than get out where someone might crash into me because they didn't know how to drive, and cost me several hundred to several thousands in damages to vehicle and/or self, so I tried to sit out the few inclement days we have each year and let the others play the game demolition derby!

My truck is a four wheel drive now and I have engaged the four wheel drive on average about once each year of ownership, and none of those times was for use because of snow or ice, but it is there if & when I need it. I believe every time, but one, I have engaged the four wheel drive it was for traction while pulling something or someone who was stuck or in the ditch. The one exception was for use navigating a slick, muddy & rutted out dirt road going to a friends funeral & internment.
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Old 01-28-2016, 03:05 AM
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This is very true, even with trucks to a degree. I still have a couple pairs of the old "strap chains", which are just two chains with a strap that goes through the rim.
>> Yes.... I still have 2-3 pairs of these in the garage somewhere.... Like said, the thing you must remember about them is they most likely won't work on wheels that have disc breaks... Bummer.. But better than nothing on, usually, rear wheels that still have drum breaks.. Even if not powered rear wheels.. They are bound to help in turning and breaking..
---
Back in my oil field days in Wy.. I used chains all times of the year it seemed.. When going across the prairie, winter is a given.. Spring, summer, and fall like said was gumbo mud... At times I used one or both front wheels chained up to aid steering.. Even on a not 4x4 service truck..

Biggest, best safety tool you have is the one under your cap....
KnowwhatImean...

Keep safe..
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Old 01-29-2016, 09:06 PM
Nickathome Nickathome is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad_Professor View Post
Make sure you know how to properly install the chains.

A good farm grade bumper type jack should be in your truck too, that lets you get the wheel up and the chains on tight. I've seen a chain jump off and rip out a brake line. No brakes in the snow is not good either.

To go with the jack add a couple of 2 x 10" that you can put under wheels when needed. Also a couple of logging chains. The farm jack can double as a cumalong hooked to the chains.
No need to jack up the wheels. The chains I have has tensioners built into them. The chains come with a little tool (basically an "L" shaped screw driver-like affair) that you insert into the tensioner and turn in one direction. It really tightens up the chain. There are something like three tensioners on each chain. Plus I bought the rubber tensioners as an add on. Once the chain is on and tight the rubber tensioner is added to the outside of each wheel, and the hooks are attached to the chain in a star fashion. The chain does not get loose, trust me.
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Old 01-30-2016, 03:05 PM
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Our average yearly snowfall is about 1.5", and during this last storm we got a grand total of .125".

I don't think I've even seen a set of chains in over 50 years, when I lived 150 miles further West
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Old 01-31-2016, 12:52 AM
Nickathome Nickathome is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearfootfarm View Post
Our average yearly snowfall is about 1.5", and during this last storm we got a grand total of .125".

I don't think I've even seen a set of chains in over 50 years, when I lived 150 miles further West
Our normal yearly snowfall is around 24". So far this year we got 22" in one day. A few years ago we had a record snowfall for the season with something like 74", however that is extremely rare for this area.
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Old 02-02-2016, 01:58 PM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
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I have a set for our 4wd truck, but since most of our snow fell on a weekend, I didn't need them for snow (at least not yet).

Prior to the summer, our driveway was a mudfest, so I needed the chains several times to get back up the hill. We had it excavated and gravelled so the chains haven't been needed.

The set I have has a sort of cam loop latching/tensioning mechanism. I can usually get one or two on tight the first time, and seem to always have one or two where I have to drive forward a few revolutions and then tighten them one additional link.

Turns out NAPA carries just the latch...

http://www.napaonline.com/Catalog/Ca...063_0006405803

I found the hard way that I could really use a set for the 2wd tractor. Have been contemplating making my own set up out of chain since the tractor sets are big bucks and heavy to ship. Curious if anyone's tried that.
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Old 02-02-2016, 04:04 PM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Default Tractor Chains...

Chrisser... I would suggest making a summer fun project out of road trip searching the tractor dealers in and around your area for chains.. In summer you can find them on sale... That is how I lucked out on my set..

Also, there are more internet suppliers that carry tractor chains now.. Prices many times are good enough that with shipping is still can be a good deal.. Takes a lot of keyboard work to search out...

Good luck...
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Old 02-03-2016, 04:57 PM
grumpa Male grumpa is offline
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Used to plow snow as a sideline and a couple of times had to chain up all 4 wheels it was so deep. Still have chains but it would have to be a dire emergency before we'd attempt to get out if it got that bad. We do carry 2 sets of those strap on chains in both the car and in the 4x4 in case we get caught out some where. Appreciate that comment about clearance and the brake calipers hadn't even thought about that. Stay warm.
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Old 05-19-2016, 06:57 AM
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Now that winter is over I can say I had to chain my Dodge 4x4 twice and all four wheels. I have not had to do that for a long time. I always chain the tractors but I almost forgot how to do the truck.
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Old 07-06-2016, 05:39 PM
Lurch Male Lurch is offline
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My 1984 CUCV stays chained up on all fours, all winter, with studded tire chains. Its the only way to plow snow on steep ground. The truck never sees pavement. I sometimes have to chain up my daily driver when there is an icing situation on the steeper parts of the road, but that is a rare occasion. I do, however use studded tires on the DD.
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