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  #1  
Old 07-18-2016, 10:48 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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Default In spite of heat, my homestead is producing well!

Dinner tonight is a stir fry made from garden vegetables (Bell pepper, onion, bok choi, and green beans) and some leftover chicken. Dessert will be sugar free blackberry pie, made with my berries.

And, I had sugar-free home made blackberry ice cream for breakfast.

DH is not the homesteading type, but he does NOT! complain: he does like to eat well!
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  #2  
Old 07-19-2016, 10:12 AM
SmallFlocksMom Female SmallFlocksMom is offline
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It sure sounds as though you're eating well! I'd love your recipes for sugar-free ice-cream and pie. I'm in a constant uphill struggle trying to reduce the family's sugar intake. It's really hard to kick many years' habits.
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Old 07-19-2016, 02:56 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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My ice cream maker only makes a cup at a time. Which is a serving for one.

I squash some berries, fill the container with milk, add 3-4 drops of vanilla to my 1-cup ice cream maker, and add 2 packages of NutraSweet.

Mix.

As for the pie recipe, I know of 2. One calls for blind baking the pie crust and setting it aside. Cook the berries on top of the stove, and cornstarch while they are cooking and keep stirring, then take it off the heat and stir a bit more.

Then, when it is cool, add NutraSweet and put in the pie shell. I used to keep some berries out to cover the top of the pie, because the cooked filling does not look attractive.

I look up the recipe, note how much sugar is needed, and figure the equivalent of NutraSweet.

What I am using now is a type of artificial sweetener (Nevella) that can be cooked. The finished product is good but still a bit tart. It is a work in progress: I am new to Nevella.

By the way, you can make peach jam with 1/3 of the sugar if you omit the lemon juice. Only, regular pectin will not make it jell. You will have to use pectin that is meant for sugar-free jam, and you will have to stir without stopping or the jam will scorch.

The results are more like peaches than like the intense sweetness of jam, but it is pretty good.
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Old 07-19-2016, 10:42 PM
doc doc is offline
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I eat a lot of ice cream.

A whole pint contains about 16 tsp of sugar (~250 cal). Four slices of Italian bread has about 240 cal of carbs--just to keep things in perspective.

I'd rather eat the ice cream.
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Old 07-20-2016, 12:24 PM
SmallFlocksMom Female SmallFlocksMom is offline
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Terri, thanks for the tips. I don't normally use NutraSweet, but might give it a try. Yesterday I made fig jam without lemon juice; you're right, it does help cut out some sugar from the recipe.
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Old 07-20-2016, 04:49 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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You could substitute stevia for at least some of the sugar if you don't like using chlorinated hydrocarbons to sweeten your stuff, and use the low-methoxyl pectin to gel it, as it uses calcium instead of sugar to thicken the mixture. We almost always use the low-methoxyl pectin made from citrus, as less sugar DOES allow more of the fresh fruit flavor to come through.
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Old 07-21-2016, 08:18 AM
SmallFlocksMom Female SmallFlocksMom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doninalaska View Post
You could substitute stevia for at least some of the sugar if you don't like using chlorinated hydrocarbons to sweeten your stuff,
Don, I'd give this a shot but my husband is very wary of stevia. He has read some stuff about active components in stevia which might be potentially dangerous if overdone. I really should sit down and analyze what data I can find on stevia, so we may decide whether it's safe to use.
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Old 07-21-2016, 03:08 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Everything can have its downsides and side effects, but I am not aware of serious problems with stevia. Maybe just use the low-methoxyl pectin and use less sugar and be content with that. I have more problems with synthetic products that I do with natural ones, although there can be problems with both. We just made raspberry jam yesterday with reduced amounts of sugar; it tastes so much like fresh raspberries that I could simply eat it with a spoon.
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Old 07-22-2016, 09:12 AM
SmallFlocksMom Female SmallFlocksMom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doninalaska View Post
We just made raspberry jam yesterday with reduced amounts of sugar; it tastes so much like fresh raspberries that I could simply eat it with a spoon.
I have heard it's possible to make jam entirely without sugar simply by using very ripe fruit and boiling it down, but this way you get less product. I personally have never tried that yet.
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Old 08-11-2016, 10:27 PM
Leanne Female Leanne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmallFlocksMom View Post
I have heard it's possible to make jam entirely without sugar simply by using very ripe fruit and boiling it down, but this way you get less product. I personally have never tried that yet.
I have a whole book on the subject, actually, and I'd recommend it. Everything I've made from it has tasted terrific. It's called The Joy of Jams, Jellies, and Other Sweet Preserves, by Linda Zeidrich. She also did a pretty terrific book on pickles. I have that one too, and ditto on the recommendation.
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