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Preparedness/Survival Skills/BOBs/Kits/Gear If it will help keep you going when TSHTF, talk about it here.

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Old 08-20-2016, 07:07 AM
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randallhilton Male randallhilton is offline
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Default Navigating with tablet/smart phone

Since our homestead is in the suburbs our plan "A" is to stay put and be part of the solution in the event of most types of disruptions.

But getting out of Dodge is also part of the plan. We have at least 3 sites within a 3 day hike (but of course we'd try to drive!). I started spending some quality time scoping out routes on Google Earth. Getting out of the city would be the biggest challenge, I think, and from there my plan is to stay off road as much as possible.

I mapped water sources along the routes and marked them as way points.

Originally, I was going to print maps of the routes but to get enough detail, we're looking at lots of pages. What I've decided to do is print low resolution "overviews" as a backup to the topo maps on my phone and tablet. I have the maps stored on the device so I don't need cell service. If the cell service fails, and our satellites are knocked out, I can still use the phone maps with a compass. And if none of that stuff works . . . well, it's going to be hard.

I just need power which means carrying a solar charger and a couple of battery packs. That's a lot of weight to carry but I figure it will reduce the hiking miles, which is probably more effective than packing light.

Here's the app I'm using: https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...hamerica&hl=en

It's simple to use and allows me to import .kml files from Google Earth.
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Old 08-20-2016, 01:07 PM
Mad_Professor Mad_Professor is offline
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Do you have a good compass? Quality used military grade ones can be had for ca. $ 20.

You might also want to hike the routes and see if those markers and water sources are like.

Besides water sources which are going to be low points not visible in line of sight navigation, map out peaks/mountains to use as markers for using your compass.

If you are not framiliar with compass navigation, go out some weekend in deep woods with your compass and map, plan a route and hike it.

Download this one for a start:

THE OFFICIAL U.S. MILITARY PRECISION LENSATIC COMPASS INSTRUCTIONAL BOOKLET

CAMMENGA

I have it but can't post it here as it's PDF format.
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Old 08-20-2016, 02:02 PM
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Do you have a good compass? Quality used military grade ones can be had for ca. $ 20.
Excellent point. Oh yes, I have, and know how to use my lensatic military style compass. I spent 5 years in the Texas State Guard and part of our mission included wide area damage assessment which involved quite a bit of land nav.

I giggle a little when you mention mountains. Here in Texas, we use water towers as landmarks.

Excellent point about hiking the routes. There are many sections along the way where we would be cutting across private property. I won't be using those routes for practice but if rule of law starts breaking down, I'm wiling to push the limit a bit.

My youngest son and I are planning a 3 day bug out bag hike in November. We'll be practicing land nav, probably even some night travel, using only our bug out bags. I told him this hike is more about learning than it is about fun. It will be interesting.

Great comments!
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Old 08-20-2016, 02:24 PM
Mad_Professor Mad_Professor is offline
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Glad you are up to speed on using a compass. I don't trust the electric stuff.

Texas is pretty big and has some good mountains (8000'), guess you are not headed/near there.

Want to here a funny one about "flatland" navigation?

Many years ago I visited Basstun Ma. Parked the pickup near the waterfront then proceeded to see the sights until nightime. Well Basstun streets are more tangled up than a fishing reel after a backlash. I had no clue where to walk back to the truck and buildings were too high to see the dipper/northstar. So I pulled out the compass and headed east..........ended up a couple of blocks north of the truck.
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Old 08-20-2016, 04:34 PM
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So I pulled out the compass and headed east..........ended up a couple of blocks north of the truck.
My son and I were visiting the 3,000 acre panhandle spread of a friend. At one part of his place there was a small lake with a cabin next to it. I was eager to teach my son some land nav skills. I showed him the topo map of the area, showed him how to get a bearing etc. Then we marched off to the fishing cabin.

I showed him how to use the compass to line up land marks to stay on course. The area had lots of deep ravines so staying on course required careful navigation.

We hiked and hiked. It's difficult to count paces in rugged terrain like that but I estimated that we should have found the ravine where the lake was. But we missed it. I finally decided we were North of our target and did some bushwhacking to get to a high point. Finally found the target and we were over a kilometer off course.

After resting up at the fishing cabin we followed the jeep trail back to the main house. Then I sat down and recalculated the route. That's when I realized that I had forgotten to calculate the magnetic declination!!!! It was exactly the same distance that we missed by. ARRRGGGHHH! I had to tell my son: "Don't do like I did!"
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Old 08-20-2016, 04:47 PM
Mad_Professor Mad_Professor is offline
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Yes, MN is 14 oW from true north here.

North Star is pretty much dead north.

P.S. ever sit back at night and watch the big dipper spin around the north star? have a few times while watching the Persids meteor showers
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Old 08-25-2016, 11:52 AM
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Your plan to have backup paper is a good one. Especially if it an EMP or Solar Storm that disrupts most electronic media. You are a good example of what it means when you use the rule "two is one and one is none".
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