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  #21  
Old 08-21-2016, 10:32 AM
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coaltrain Male coaltrain is offline
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I leave the snakes alone also - they are part of my team for keeping the rodents (red squirrels and chipmunks) at bay.

As I said above I grew up with copperheads. Then when we lived up on top of the mountain here we had timber rattlers (big ones!). As you said they are generally passive and will work their way away from you unless cornered.

Since living here (at the bottom of the mountain) we haven't seen a poisonous snake in the 20 years we've been here. Lots of garder, black, and quite a few other varieties. See a lot of them along the creek banks. Nothing wrong with them and they are left alone or relocated if they are too near Mrs. C's burn pit.


As far as shooting on the porch - I did shoot quite a few chipmunks and red squirrels this year on the deck. For some reason this year we were infested with them. I am thinking it was because of the very mild winter of last. I use my .22 rifle with .22 short ammo. Yeah - I make a little ding here and there in the wood but feel there isn't too much danger of it ricocheting back at me. I could actually sit in my chair in our sitting room - there is a big sliding glass door leading to the deck in that room - and shoot from my chair (on those days I couldn't get up). Not the best or safest way I admit but it gave me something to do on those days I was chair bound. I just didn't shoot directly at the deck floor but waited until they were on the railing.

I was actually successful in my attempts. After 6-8 weeks of shooting (I only shot them if on the deck) and a couple rat traps they got the idea. There are still plenty of them off in the trees away from the house but haven't seen one on the deck for over a month now.

For practice I have a little range of sorts setup out in the field to the north of my house (with a steep hill behind of course). I can shoot from my deck which is great as there are a lot of days that is as far as I can walk. Shooting my .22s gives me something to occupy myself on those days and keeps me in practice.
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  #22  
Old 09-03-2016, 06:24 PM
lostone1413 lostone1413 is offline
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Most attacks start at a distance of 5 feet or less. That close you really think you would have a chance to load your gun?? Jeff Cooper founder of Gun Site use to say "A safe gun is a useless gun" Get some good training Handling a loader gun isn't that big a deal after some training
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  #23  
Old 09-05-2016, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lostone1413 View Post
Most attacks start at a distance of 5 feet or less. That close you really think you would have a chance to load your gun?? Jeff Cooper founder of Gun Site use to say "A safe gun is a useless gun" Get some good training Handling a loader gun isn't that big a deal after some training
Oh my, that old internet gun forum myth just ain't ever going to die, now, is it!

MOST GUNFIGHTS THAT YOU RUN A HIGHER RISK OF BEING SHOT IN OCCUR AT AND INSIDE 3 TO 5 YARDS.

'Get some good training Handling a loader gun (sic) isn't that big a deal after some training.'

Famous last words!

Look, a loaded gun around the house is still a loaded gun around the house; and, a potential for misuse continues to be present. For instance, have you ever thought about coming home late one night to suddenly wind up facing your own gun?

(It's something to think about!)

A revolver is a good choice for a first handgun; but, now, you need to learn how to safely and skillfully use it. I'm going to offer to start you off in exactly the same way that I do with all brand new, neophyte, pistol shooters. For the rest of your, 'time with guns' I'd like you to be aware that:

GUN SAFETY CENTERS ON YOUR OWN ACQUIRED GUN SAFETY HABITS - HABITS!

A small gun safe mounted near your bed can be a very useful home safety device. Me? I sleep with a gun under my pillow; and I have slept this way for, at least, the past 30 years; but I'm also in that very small percentile of the American public who has been extensively trained with firearms, and has long excelled at using them.

(Not on the internet - in real life, OK!)

When I carry a revolver - Which, even though I prefer using a revolver over a semiautomatic, is not all that often nowadays - I also carry a brace of speedloaders about six inches in front of the holster. I'm wondering: Can you find, at least, two speedloaders; or, perhaps, a couple of Bianchi, 'Speed Strips' for your new revolver?

While I don't know you, and have no real idea what you are or are not capable of, I have no strong objection to you keeping a loaded revolver around the house. Just remember that it's going to be the potential liability I warned you about; you're going to have to be extra careful whenever visitors are around; and for the rest of your, 'time with guns' I'd recommend that you keep the following very necessary precautions well in mind. In fact, I'd like to see you inculcate these rules into your own personal gun-handling habits:

JEFF COOPER’S FOUR BASIC RULES OF FIREARM SAFETY

1. The gun is ALWAYS loaded!

2. Never allow the muzzle to point at - or, even, so much as sweep across - ANYTHING you are unwilling to see destroyed!

3. Never put your finger inside the trigger guard until AFTER you have made a conscious decision to fire!

4. CLEARLY identify your target, the target's backstop, and what is beyond!

5. The frequently unstated fifth rule is, NEVER play with a gun! (Because people do!)

Don’t embellish these rules. They are what they are for good reasons! In order for any firearm safety rule to become truly effective it must stop being just a rule, and become a PROFOUND PERSONAL HABIT, instead.

OTHER USEFUL FIRING LINE GUN SAFETY RULES INCLUDE:

6. Never point the gun's muzzle anywhere except downrange and at the targets.

7. When you're on a firing line, never turn around with a gun in your hands; and never - for any reason like a jam or misfire - turn the muzzle toward either side of the line. The muzzle should always point only at the targets.

8. When you're finished shooting: Clear the weapon; and always return the gun to the shooting bench with the action or cylinder open, and/or the magazine out. On a semiautomatic pistol the slide should be locked back with the open breech-side showing. (Usually the right side of the pistol, OK!) As always the muzzle should continue to point downrange.

9. Never so much as touch a gun, or handle any ammunition while someone is downrange at the targets.

10. If you are watching someone else shoot remember to stand on his gun hand side. ‘Why’? Because a novice shooter’s muzzle tends to break, or climb towards his support hand or, ‘weak side.’ (Which is exactly where you don’t want to be!)

Read this page. If you call the number at the bottom of the page someone will give you the names of certified firearms instructors in your area whom you can contact for proper firearm training. A local instructor can also point you towards the best gun clubs in your area where you can go to practice.
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  #24  
Old 09-05-2016, 04:53 PM
lostone1413 lostone1413 is offline
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Jeff Cooper use to say You have so many safety rules so if you forget 2 or 3 you will still be alright. He still said a safe gun is a useless gun

As far as what distance most fights start at you will find most if not all trainers will tell you that you measure the distance in feet not yards. Ask trainers that work at places like Gun Site and see what they say Or ask people that work in high risk areas doing personal protection Working in places like South America or South Africa or the Mid East. Everyone I've know and I've known more then a few will tell you the distance is in feet the majority of times
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  #25  
Old 09-06-2016, 10:46 AM
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Doesn't this point to poor situational awareness? Why did the person/ s allow a threat to get within 5 feet of them?
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  #26  
Old 09-06-2016, 02:28 PM
lostone1413 lostone1413 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CountryGuy View Post
Doesn't this point to poor situational awareness? Why did the person/ s allow a threat to get within 5 feet of them?
If you have been in many just street fights alone How many really started at much more then 5 feet away? I bet very few if any If a gun or a blade comes into play almost all the time it will start as just a fight.

Also you hear people say don't bring a knife to a gunfight. At close combat range many times a knife can be more dangerous.

The trouble is most trainers I'd say over 90% teach gun handling. After your confident handling a gun you need to train with a trainer that teaches gunfighting . Their is a big difference. The one who teaches gun fighting you will learn to draw as you move and shoot as you move. No two steps to the right or left then stop and shoot. That isn't the way it will go down. You will learn how important it is to be able to sight shoot or point shoot You need both. You won't go to a class that will tell you that you need a OWB Holster with retention. You will carry and be dressed 100% like you do everyday This is just a couple differences between a gun handler instructor and a gun fighting instructor You have many more But if someone isn't confident in their gun handling ability I'd tell them to stick with the gun handling instructor
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  #27  
Old 09-06-2016, 11:37 PM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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Even if most fights don't start at 5 feet, they may end at 5 feet or closer. An attacker can cover a lot of ground while someone is drawing and setting up.

I would be willing that many of us that Carry, can draw and set up based on muscle memory, but not many of us encounter potential dangerous threats on a regular basis, can identify without confusion or hesitation, when to draw or not to draw, etc.
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  #28  
Old 09-07-2016, 07:15 AM
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Here's some good - and apparently very necessary - reading for some of you guys:

WHAT REALLY HAPPENS IN A GUNFIGHT!

Anyone who thinks he's gunfighting at 3 to 5 feet is NOT gunfighting. He's been caught in a CQB PISTOL AMBUSH, instead!

Worse, if someone doesn't know the difference between a CQB pistol gunfight, and a CQB pistol ambush, AND he's also too, 'dim' to know when or when not to defend himself then - (Ready?) - more than likely that person is NOT going to survive for long enough to get into dumb arguments with even dumber people on anybody's internet gun forum!

Some of you IGF, 'experts' (and I use the term loosely) are so misinformed that, quite honestly, you have no business posting on a gun forum.
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  #29  
Old 09-07-2016, 10:40 AM
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It may come as a surprise to some, that even though Sight Shooting has been taught to the military and Police for over 100 years, there is no hard evidence (pics or videos), of it ever being used effectively in a CQB situation.

Also, and directly related to that, is the recognized PO hit rate of less than 20% in CQB situations, which asks the question: who continues to send and pay for attendees at shooting schools whose graduates hit their target less than 20% of the time in CQB situations?

This state of affairs is reminiscent of the tale about the emperor’s new clothes. And it would be humerous, except it is not a fairy tale. It is reality. And a consequence is the PO death and wounded rate, which has not changed much in over 20 years.

Another related stat per the FBI, is that if you are going to be shot or killed, there is an 80% chance that it will happen at less than 21 feet. That also is the distance at which most all gun fights occur.
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  #30  
Old 09-07-2016, 07:33 PM
lostone1413 lostone1413 is offline
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Short of getting in a real gunfight you only have one way to find out if the training your getting really pays off. Do some hard force on force training. You might be shocked as to what works and what doesn't work
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  #31  
Old 09-08-2016, 09:24 AM
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there is a new tactical video game simulator out that they have been using to train police with. one of the customs agents I see around town was telling me about it. its like a laser tag gun and the officer goes into a room with 3d screen around them. depending on how they respond the simulator reacts to them. automatic fail if they shoot non hostile targets. saw a video o the simulator and it looks impressive. though its extremely expensive and the state only has 1 training unit that they send around to train officers with (the state troops, boarder patrol, customs, and a bunch of other LEOs used it when it came up in the spring).
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