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  #1  
Old 10-26-2016, 09:13 PM
crackergirl Female crackergirl is offline
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Default This may be happening

We may be about to have our own place, after many years of dreaming. It is only a couple of acres and a house, but...
Meanwhile we are waiting to hear from the appraisers, who seem to be in no hurry. The only pitfalls I see are if the appraisal comes in too low, or if Kingdom comes! In that case, I have a home anyway.
Just wanted to share the excitement. And to shore up those readers who think, like I have for a long time, 'It will never happen for me.'
Keep dreaming. It will happen for you too.
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  #2  
Old 10-27-2016, 01:11 AM
Selena Selena is offline
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One can do a lot with a house and a couple of acres. Good luck. You can also do some legwork of your own re: appraisal. Despite laws to the contrary, some financial institutions haven't read the memo. Sadly not all states require an appraiser to be licensed.
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  #3  
Old 10-27-2016, 08:02 AM
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Congrats! Proves if you keep a dream alive it can happen! Hope all goes well for you..
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  #4  
Old 10-27-2016, 09:23 AM
doc doc is offline
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We've got our fingers crossed for you.

It'll all work out for the better: if the property doesn't appraise high enough, that'll be ammo for you to get the seller to renegotiate at the lower price.

Personally, I prefer living in the DreamWorld. Reality can be a bummer.
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Old 10-27-2016, 10:08 AM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
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good luck with it, my first place was an old house on an acre of land there is a lot you can do with so little.
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  #6  
Old 10-27-2016, 04:31 PM
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Hope everything is smooth sailing with no waves to rock the boat on your purchase.
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  #7  
Old 11-18-2016, 09:57 PM
crackergirl Female crackergirl is offline
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Default Hurrah!

Closed yesterday and walked the property line with a machete today, finding old fences and making a crazy-long list of 'to dos'
Wonder if there is an imoge for 'walking on air' ... with an aching back.
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  #8  
Old 11-19-2016, 12:19 PM
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CountryGuy CountryGuy is offline
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Congrats on new home!!! Guess someone got their Christmas present about a month early.

Make those lists but resist the urge to start building things. Live with your ground a bit to learn it and to determine its pluses and minuses. I'd suggest drawing up a map (screen shot of satellite view from Google Map can be great) of your property and existing buildings, drive ways, well, fences, septic system and other features. Then make up some overlays that you can use to plan from. Also try to determine sun and shade patterns, direction of prevailing winds, paths of water run off and similar natural effects. IS it just a residence with typical lawn or does it already have things like a garden, raised beds, berry patches or orchards or the like?

Again, big congratulations to you and your family.
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  #9  
Old 11-19-2016, 07:35 PM
crackergirl Female crackergirl is offline
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Default Needs some love

The area right around the house and sheds is pretty clear. One shed used to be a barn, but been let go so long we don't know if we can save all of it. Maybe half. There are two other sheds, maybe a potting shed and a tool room.
The ground is really overgrown, we found a grapevine today that easily held DS (150 lb big ole boy) while he played tarzan.
The winter will be spent cutting things back, burning brush and the like. Replacing shed roofs, too. And getting moved. I hate moving.
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  #10  
Old 11-20-2016, 02:47 PM
Nickathome Nickathome is offline
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Time to rent that chipper.......
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  #11  
Old 11-21-2016, 08:34 PM
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Stinger Male Stinger is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selena View Post
One can do a lot with a house and a couple of acres. Good luck. You can also do some legwork of your own re: appraisal. Despite laws to the contrary, some financial institutions haven't read the memo. Sadly not all states require an appraiser to be licensed.
That's mostly true, except a certified appraiser is still a certified appraiser; and I don't know of a single national appraiser's association whose accredited courses are anywhere near easy to pass.

The first time I took a series of college courses in order to become accredited for residential work there were over 300 people in the class. Fewer than 12 passed the final exam; and I wasn't one of them. The second time I took the same series of courses there were about 200 people in the class. Myself and three or four other people were the only ones who passed.

Academically, things were no different than the similar situation with legal bar examinations: When I was in the profession each appraiser candidate was allowed up to three chances in one lifetime in order to pass any one, or all four of the designated credential examinations. If a person were unfortunate enough to flunk all three examination attempts for any one particular designation then, after that, it was, 'Do you want fries with that, Sir?' time at McDonald's

For example: If a candidate were to pass an initial examination and received the first (residential) certification but, afterwards, failed thrice to pass the second (small business and multiple dwelling) examination then that appraiser would be allowed to retain the first earned designation; however, that was as far as that appraiser's professional accreditation was allowed to go. No additional (higher) designations were available! Academically and professionally, appraisal science could be, and often was, a tough profession!

When I sought to advance myself into small business and multiple dwelling appraisals (income properties and apartment houses) there were, something like, 70 or 80 other residential appraisers in the class. All of us had many years of residential appraisal experience. It was a grandfathered, one time only exam. After that one examination only candidates with college degrees in numerical specialties like (but not limited to): appraisal analysis, actuarial science, or mathematics would be allowed to pursue the designation; so for all of the residential appraisers in that room it was, quite literally, time to 'do or die'.

I did not have one of the accepted types of college degrees; so I was every bit as, 'desperate' as everyone else who had signed up for that one time only final exam. How was I feeling? My confidence level was such that, in spite of my considerable skill in residential home appraisal work, I walked out of that examination room convinced — absolutely convinced — that I had failed the one and only chance I would ever have to legitimately evaluate commercial properties! I felt like I'd blown it; and that, 'big cream pie' had smacked me right in the face!

And, why not? I didn't think that things went particularly well for me that afternoon. I was the first person in the room to finish the normally 3 to 4 hour examination; and I did it in only about 90 minutes. Then, worried, I went back and reevaluated all of my previous work. (Which amounted to running a whole lot of numbers again for a second time!) After I reached the same conclusion(s) twice, I thought to myself, 'What the heck!' and I walked up to the front of the room, and handed the test pages into the examination monitor. (He seemed sympathetic!)

I recognized the man. He was a senior, court-approved appraiser who held all of the popularly recognized designations; and (opps!) he was also a personal friend of the man I was working for at the time. So, ....... I gave that fellow a sheepish smile, thanked him for his time, and said, 'Tell Tom that I tried; will ya!' He was cordial and replied, 'Hey, you never know!' 'I've been doing this for a long time; and some people just work faster than others.' I shrugged; and promptly wrote the whole event off, 'to experience'.

Thereafter came a long almost 30 day wait for the examination results. One afternoon I walked into the office to see the boss giving me a huge smile. (Not a raise, not typical behavior for him, but a huge smile!) When he knew he had my attention he quipped, 'Remember that one time only, commercial appraisal exam you took some weeks back?' I answered, 'Yeah, the one I didn't do so well on.' I'll never forget his reply; he snickered and said, 'I just got off the phone with Fred; he's quite impressed with you.' 'You're the only one in the room who passed; and you did it with an almost perfect score of 99!'

Well, ....... 'knock me over with a feather!' That made me the last residential appraiser in the State of New Jersey to receive commercial credentials without having a highly specialized college education!

I'm retired now; but I'll always remember that FULLY ACCREDITED everyday residential appraisal work, is one of the most academically challenging, technically demanding jobs that anyone could ever do. In fact, I've never met an accredited appraiser whom I thought of as being incompetent — unjustifiably prejudice, perhaps, but never incompetent.

Working in analytical appraisal science is a damned tough job; one that requires an extraordinary ability with both mathematics and the coordinated analysis of myriad market details. I very much doubt that, since I left the business, it's become any easier! Personally I liked the work; but not the tedium of repeatedly doing the exact same sort of market analysis over and over again; but, hey, I've always had an unusually busy mind, and an unusually low boredom threshold — Which is, probably, the reason, 'Why' I was always looking to expand my academic and professional horizons!

I'd suggest not being too quick to find fault with an accredited residential appraiser; especially when, a very large number of people could not, and would not be able to do the sort of extensive number and data crunching work that one of these people has to live with every single day.*



* Post submitted by a retired former member of: (1) The Society Of Real Estate Appraisers (Now The Appraisal Institute), and (2) The National Association Of Independent Fee Appraisers. (Neither of which organizations is for the academically challenged!)
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Last edited by Stinger; 11-23-2016 at 02:06 PM.
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  #12  
Old 11-22-2016, 09:23 AM
wildturnip Female wildturnip is offline
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Thanks for sharing your story! It was fascinating!

Congratulations Crackergirl! One suggestion..don't be too quick to cut and burn brush unless you know for sure what each tree or bush is and whether or not you want to keep it. I have seen new landowners clear their property of trees and bushes and then come back and plant just what they cut down because they didn't take time to study what they had.
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  #13  
Old 11-29-2016, 08:20 PM
CountryMom22 Female CountryMom22 is offline
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Congrats Crackergirl! You can do a lot with just a little space. Keep us posted on your journey!
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  #14  
Old 11-29-2016, 09:01 PM
crackergirl Female crackergirl is offline
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Default Mostly thorns

Mostly I have been cutting thorns and grapevine, and some small cedar trees. Haven't had enough time to get into it, although I will be in full time residence by mid-December, with DH to follow about 6 weeks later.
Also plan on putting up a chicken pen attached to one of the sheds and try to find someone to till the garden spot so I will be able to use a hand tiller (troy bilt) on it in the spring.
And painting indoors, the walls are PINK and neither DH or DS are going for that!
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