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Old 11-07-2016, 02:52 AM
ron45 ron45 is offline
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Default Cast Iron Stove Part of a Corner is missing.....

Hello to everyone. Been a while since I posted. I know there is a cast iron stove repair thread but I didn't want to hi jack that one.

I have a corner missing on a Chinese rip off of a Jotul stove. The old kind with the smoke directed thru a chamber above the fire box. It's pretty small but i'd like to get it going this winter.

I feel like welding is not appropriate for this situation. The two edges of the corner are something under two inches and and inch or so down where the sides meet.

Something that would be shape-able would be my first choice. The appearance is not a high priority. There must be some kind of ceramic product what might work. Or......... anyone have an idea?

Ron
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Old 11-08-2016, 04:48 PM
goldengate goldengate is offline
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Could you post a picture?
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Old 11-08-2016, 05:38 PM
ron45 ron45 is offline
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Sure but I'm on my way out the door, I have to dig it out of the clutter in the bunkhouse. I could be a day or too. Winter is tapping me on the shoulder and I have been aloof to her call.

Ron
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Old 11-23-2016, 03:36 AM
ron45 ron45 is offline
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I still haven't extracted the stove from the chaos of our storage room. However I've come to an easier solution. I can probably fit sheet metal [drill and tap] over the opening and seal it with ..... SOMETHING.... High temp. epoxy? or some plastic [ shape-able medium. I also have some material that looks like cotton batting that is used to make fiber Kilns. that would go between the sheet metal and the interior of the stove. I've put the project off temporarily because of higher priority `get ready for winter' tasks. I'd still welcome material suggestions for any part of this project. I know there is something called fire clay used somehow in association with stoves or building kilns. But I'd bet that stuff is pretty brittle.

Rpm

Last edited by ron45; 11-23-2016 at 03:37 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 11-23-2016, 05:14 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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I read some time ago about a method of repairing cast iron stoves. It involved cutting grooves across the area to be repaired, then placing steel pins across the gap and brazing over the pins to seal the opening. I don't remember where I saw that. I do remember them saying that you shouldn't weld across unless you really knew what you were doing, as the cast iron would crack at the heat of conventional welding.
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Old 11-23-2016, 03:43 PM
ron45 ron45 is offline
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Thank you, yes, apparently the cast iron has to be heated properly prior to welding with some special rod which I cant remember. My idea is in the same ball part sorta, with the sheet metal taking place of the welding. I would have to be some non galvanized 1/8 inch or thinner. The fiber kiln material will protect the sheet metal from burnout.... once I figure out how to keep it in place.

ps I always wanted to see Alaska and British Columbia also. But the roots are deep now in New Mexico, Off grid here since 83. Sometimes we still get too much snow here. We live on top of a mesa with a mile of rocky switch backs to get up. Sometimes 4wd is not enough.

But it's still an adventure day in day out and I love it all.

Ron
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Old 12-24-2016, 01:28 AM
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Default Magna 770 Rods for welding Cast Iron

Some information I recently came across when looking for some information on welding cast iron for myself.

The following comments are directly from the article I read: "Welding cast iron is easy with Magna 770 rods. Starting at $130.00/lb the electrodes are not cheap, but they do what other electrodes can't. They provide perfect machinable welds on nearly all types of cast iron without preheating.The welds have a higher tensile strength than most types of cast iron so they won't crack. They even work on dirty and oily cast iron. The rod is popular for repairing any type cast iron that is not easily replaceable. The 770 rods can be used to repair cast iron engine blocks and cylinder heads as they easily handle the high RPM and compression. The 770 can also be used as a transition rod between cast iron and steel. The welder only needs to build up a layer of the more expensive 770 rod and then weld lower cost steel rods on top of it.

The 770's come in three sizes: 3/32, 1/8 & 5/32 and can be used with either AC or DC current and doesn't require high temperatures. The 3/32 & 1/8 inch rods work with any cracker box AC Welder, even the smallest. The 3/32 requires only 40 - 85 amps, while the 1/8 requires 60 - 100 amps and the larger 5/32 rod only requires 90 - 140 amps. Magna also has specialty rods for other welding applications."

For more information see:
Magna Industries co., Limited
magnagroup.com

I have no connection to the company what so ever. My post is purely for informational purposes.

I do have a Lincoln AC/DC stick welder (& Lincoln MIG Welder also) and as soon as I can find some of the Magna 770 rods in January 2017, I do intend to try my hand at welding on a small cast iron wood stove that we have with the Magna rods. If these rods do as informed, making repairs to our wood stove will be much simpler and cheaper than I previously anticipated. Assuming the 770 rods weld the stove without any problems, I then have a couple of other cast iron welding projects to undertake.

I sure hope the information I found and posted here is correct & factual, because my understanding was that welding cast iron was almost as difficult as finding hens teeth.
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Old 12-24-2016, 01:42 AM
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For cast iron stove & heater repairs, QuickSteel has a working temperature of 2,400 degrees F once set or cured.

There is also a stove cement for sealing small cracks or expansion joints on cast iron stoves and heaters. I did not make a note of the cements working temperature, but it was similar to the QuickSteels, best as I can remember.
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